NEW ZEALAND DISASTERS AND TRAGEDIES
MISCELLANEOUS AIR DEATHS, ACCIDENTS AND OTHER INCIDENTS OF INTEREST

This is by no means and authorative list. Also see the chronological list for other Air Disasters and Tragedies.

A site dedicated to Air Crashes since 1919 is - AVIATION SAFETY NETWORK - the database is searchable by aircraft type, geographical region etc.

Also see - THE WINGS OVER NEW ZEALAND AVIATION FORUM - numerous discussion boards.

02 November 1899 - Captain Charles LORRAINE - [David Charles MAHONEY] balloonist. New Zealand's First Air Death.
Shocking Death of Christchurch Balloonist.
Captain Lorraine made a balloon ascent this afternoon from Lancaster Park in the presence of a large crowd, including his wife. Immediately on the balloon rising a cry of horror went up from the spectators for the parachute had broken free and hung below. For a few moments the Captain clung to it but the strain was too great, however, and the bundle of silk collapsed and fluttered to the earth then the balloon bounded up with a great rush and the wind carried it towards Sumner. The Captain appeared to be climbing up to the silk then it was remembered that he had no knife and had borrowed one to cut some string before ascending. The great globe travelled away for half an hour growing smaller and smaller at last it seemed that the balloon was collapsing and acting as a parachute. By a quarter to five the speck against the sky was no longer visible. The signalman at the Harbour Board's station at the Heads was watching the aeronaut and saw him fall into the water near Port Levy Rocks. A telephone message was sent to Captain Clark, Harbour master, who despatched a tug. The signalman also launched his dinghy. A message was received from the Heads stating that Lorraine that for some time on the balloon which remained buoyant in the water but subsequently it sank and the balloonist was seen swimming towards the Heads from which two boats were proceeding. At half past five Captain Clarke received a message from the Pilot Station stating that Lorraine was seen to disappear in the water. The boat from the station pulled over the spot but discovered no race of the missing man. The tug returned, having seen no sign of him and there is little doubt that Captain Lorraine has been drowned. Bay of Plenty Times, Volume XXIV, Issue 3920, 3 November 1899, Page 2. See also - - The tragedy of Captain Charles Lorraine, 1899

1914 - 1920 - WORLD WAR ONE NEW ZEALAND AIR DEATHS

01 February 1919 - HILL — On February 1st, Cecil Mckenzie HILL, Chief Instructor Flying School, late of Bridgwater, England. Result of an air accident. Press, Volume LV, Issue 16437, 3 February 1919, Page 1. On February 1st the tragic death by accident of the Company's Chief Instructor, Mr Cecil Mackenzie HILL [sic]. The circumstances are too recent and well known to need recapitulation, and the measure of the loss sustained is known to all. Mr Hill came to the company less than two years ago with the highest testimonials both as a flying instructor and as a skilled mechanic, and his record while in charge of the school at Sockburn will cause his memory to be honoured in the story of aviation in New Zealand. Timaru Herald, Volume CVIII, Issue 16824, 20 May 1919, Page 9

11 November 1920 - A terrible aviation fatality, involving three deaths, occurred near the New Plymouth racecourse shortly after 4pm, when Messrs Walsh Bros.' Avro aeroplane, carrying, the pilot and two passengers crashed and the machine was wrecked and the occupants were killed. The dead were:
Captain Richard [Dick] RUSSELL, D.F.C, Croix de Guerre, pilot, 24 years;
Mr James CLARKE, aged 42, Mayor of New Plymouth;
Miss Kathleen Vera WARNOCK, aged 24.
The Avro, which arrived in New Plymouth from Palmerston North, had been engaged daily on passenger flights from the racecourse, and Mr Clarke and Miss Warnock were making a short trip when the disaster occurred.
Mr James Clarke died on the anniversary of his election as Mayor of New Plymouth, and to-night he would have carried out his intention of resigning the Mayoralty. Born at Blenheim forty-two years ago, Mr Clarke entered the Civil Service as a youth, and from the head office of the Land Department, Wellington, was transferred to New Plymouth. About fifteen years ago he resigned from the service, and joined Mr E. Gilmour in the firm of Gilmour and Clarke, land agents. Mr Clarke was a prominent footballer some years ago. From his first election as a councillor till his election as Mayor, he had always taken a prominent part in local affairs. Mrs Clarke is now en route to Blenheim, but their two young children are at home.
Miss Kathleen Vera Warnock was the second daughter of Mr and Mrs Warnock, of Hospital road, New Plymouth, and was 26 years of age. She had been employed in Rotorua for some time and had only been in New Plymouth for a few months. She had passed the qualifying examination as a chemist and was in the employ of a local pharmacy. Mr and Mrs Warnock had resided at Nelson for a time, but returned to New Plymouth about two years ago.
The pilot of the Avro machine, Captain Russell, was one of the New Zealand trained airmen who had seen service in Europe, and he was the holder of the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Croix de Guerre. He did a considerable amount of night flying at the front, and for some time was flight leader of his squadron in France. Captain Russell, who was about 26 years of age, was the son of Mr and Mrs A Russell, of Invercargill, and joined the New Zealand Flying School, at Kohimarama at the beginning of 1917, later proceeding to England with a commission as Second Lieutenant. He joined the Royal Flying Corps ... Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XLVII, Issue 15368, 12 November 1920, Page 5 and New Zealand Herald, Volume LVIII, Issue 17916, 19 October 1921, Page 8

30 December 1921 - Lieutenant Harry Cranston GROUT, 25 years died in the Christchurch Hospital from injuries he received when the Avro aeroplane in which he was flying from Kaikoura to Christchurch crashed at Motonau. Lieut. Grout had been in Blenheim and Seddon giving exhibitions of flying. On the journey back to Christchurch he stopped at Kaikoura, where a few flights were made. Lieut. Grout left Kaikoura at 10 a.m. on Friday to continue the journey to Christchurch. The machine and engine were then in good order. When near Motunau the machine was seen by residents to be travelling slowly but at a good height. When it was above a gully something apparently went wrong with the engine, and the pilot glided down to make as good a landing as possible. It is thought that the pilot in attempting to avoid this gully lost flying speed. As a result the machine stalled and fell probably thirty or forty feet...Press, Volume LVIII, Issue 17343, 3 January 1922, Page 12

16 February 1924 - A "crash" in connection with the refresher flying course at the Sockburn aerodrome [Christchurch] was experienced but was happily without serious results to passenger and pilot, although the machine became a total wreck. Lieutenant [Thomas James] DENTON, of the permanent staff, with Mr R TAYLOR as a passenger, was out for a joyride on an Avro when the engine cut out. The pilot attempted to glide back to the aerodrome, but when he failed to do so he essayed to make a forced landing in a small field. He landed safely but the Avro had too much impetus and ran across the paddock to the fence, over which it turned, and, falling into a gully, broke the fuselage and became a complete wreck. Lieutenant Denton received some slight cuts on his face, but the passenger was not injured; in fact, he signified his intention of returning for the remainder of his "flip," for it is a stipulation in passenger flights that passengers are to receive the full time for which they have paid. Northern Advocate , 18 February 1924, Page 4 and Press, Volume LX, Issue 18000, 18 February 1924, Page 8

17 March 1926 - A shocking aeroplane accident occurred at Papanui [Christchurch] at 5.30pm, resulting in the loss of two lives and serious injuries to the third occupant of the machine. Details of the victims are as follow:
KILLED. - Captain Frederick James HORRELL, 25 years, a Territorial Air Force officer.
Lewis Martin REID, 23 years, an employee of the Sockburn Aerodrome.
INJURED. Lieutenant Purcer Arlington TURNER, a Territorial Air Force officer, broken left arm and facial lacerations; also a broken lower jaw.
The two officers, Captain Horrell and Lieutenant Turner, were two of a group of flying men now undergoing a "refresher" course at the Wigram Aerodrome. Mr Reid, before joining the aerodrome staff, was a jockey, and he was in the machine as a passenger when it crashed to the ground. The aeroplane fell in the rose garden of the Methodist Orphanage. It struck the ground 12yds from a room in which 60 orphanage children were sitting down to their evening meal. It was providential that none of the inmates were out of doors at the time, otherwise the results of the accident would doubtless have been more serious. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXIII, Issue 19279, 18 March 1926, Page 8 and Press, Volume LXII, Issue 18645, 20 March 1926, Page 14 and Evening Post, Volume CXI, Issue 112, 12 May 1926, Page 10

10 May 1927 - Flying-Officer Francis Charles [Frank C] EWEN has succumbed to his injuries. Ewen was twenty-eight years old, and a New Zealander. After graduating at Duntroon Military College he held a commission in the New Zealand Permanent Forces. He joined the Australian Air Force early in 1926. Sympathy with his relatives was expressed by the Duke and Duchess of York, by the Governor-General, the Minister of Defence, and the Air Board, the members of which stated that in Ewen a keen, promising young officer had been lost to the Air Force. Ewen's machine was flying at a height of 500 feet, with four others, in the form of a letter V. Ewen's plane seemed to fall behind the others. He then attempted to spurt to catch up. The plane appeared to make an upward movement and then turned straight down, the nose and point of the left wing striking the ground simultaneously. As the machines were exercising on the opposite side of Parliament House to the review, not many people saw the crash. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXIV, Issue 19633, 11 May 1927, Page 12

17 December 1928 - A well-known air-man, Squadron-Leader Frederick Esk SANDFORD, was killed when his car skidded and somersaulted twice on a sharp bend near Glenrowan, 135 miles north of Melbourne. The car was found badly smashed with its wheels in the air. The driver's body was found some distance away. The death of Squadron-Leader Sandford recalls memories of pioneer flying in Auckland. Australian born, Squadron- Leader Sandford came to the Dominion about 1912, and with Mr W Miller, of Auckland, embarked upon what was considered at that time a doubtful venture. They commenced building aeroplanes at Avondale, and Mr Miller claims that they built the first aeroplane that successfully flew in the Dominion. The partnership produced six machines of the biplane type, which were improved by experimenting as they went along. Indeed, there was always some excitement at Avondale in the years 1912 and 1913. Both Mr Miller and Squadron-Leader Sandford flew them, and accidents were numerous. Squadron-Leader Sandford had a bad crash one day, injuring the back of his neck, and necessitating his removal to hospital, where he remained several weeks. Squadron-Leader Sandford was a very brave and very cautious man, commented Mr Miller. He always used his discretion, and can be regarded as one of the Dominion's pioneer airmen. At the outbroak of the war Squadron-Leader Sandford returned to Australia and joined up with the Australian Air Force and served in New Guinea, Egypt, and France. He had a distinguished war career and at the conclusion of activities was transferred to India, where he remained in an advisory capacity to the Air Force for about three years. Before taking up an appointment with the Federal Government he made a hurried visit to the Dominion and renewed old friendships. I was in Australia three months ago, but I did not see my old partner, Mr Miller stated. I heard, however, that he had purchased a new car, and presumably this is the one in which, he met his death. [Frederick Esk SANDFORD married Gladys HENNING (nee COATES) on the 03 April 1920 in Sydney. In December 1925 despite fierce opposition she became the first woman in New Zealand to gain a pilot's license. She applied for a divorce in December 1928, days before his death.] New Zealand Herald, Volume LXV, Issue 20132, 18 December 1928, Page 11

09 November 1928 - Lieutenant Gwynn Henry Buller MADOCKS, of the 2nd Bn, Coldstream Guards death occurred at Brooklands, near Weybridge in Surrey, at the beginning of the first meeting held by the Household Brigade Flying Club aerodrome. He was flying his own S.E 5A single-seater aeroplane. It was in this machine that later in the afternoon he was to have given a flying display. Lieut. Madocks father was Brigadier-General William Roberts Napier Madocks, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O., better known in New Zealand as Major Madocks, of the Royal Artillery. Major Madocks was in Wellington when the Boer War broke out. He volunteered for service and left with the First Contingent. Major Madocks married a Wellington girl, Laura, the only daughter of the Sir Walter Lawry BULLER. Press, Volume LXIV, Issue 19504, 28 December 1928, Page 3

14 October 1929 - People in the Spreydon district, near Christchurch were horrified at 11am when an aeroplane, having obviously developed engine trouble, landed in a ploughed paddock and turned completely over. Residents of adjacent houses rushed out on hearing the crash, and rescued the pilot, Captain Noel VALE, of the Canterbury Aero Club, from the wreckage. Captain Vale received a cut over the eye, and was treated at the out-patients departmentat the hospital, and discharged. So slightly was he injured that his stay at the hospital did not occupy more than half an hour. The machine, on the other hand, was totally wrecked.
1981/30672 Vale Noel Lancelot St Elmo 24 December 1897

12 December 1929 - A Dornier Libello flying-boat, owned by Aerial Services Limited, dived into the sea several hundred yards off the centre of Milford Beach, Auckland at about 5.30pm. The crew were:
Captain Donald Ernest HARKNESS, aged 34, the pilot and a lecturer in civil engineering at the Auckland University College and principal partner in the company
and Charles Field GOLDSBRO, aged 39, of St Heliers, the mechanic. A verdict that deaths were due to drowning as a result of the flying-boat accidentally crashing was returned.

08 January 1930 - Flying-Officer Charles Edison GALPIN, of Wanganui, was killed on 8 January 1930, in a mid-air collision at the Abu-Dueir Aviation School in Egypt. Flying-Officer Galpin was a native of Wanganui, New Zealand. He came to London in August and became a short service pilot officer in the Royal Air Force. Auckland Star, Volume LXI, Issue 8, 10 January 1930, Page 7.

08 April 1930 - When descending from an aeroplane flight over the southern reaches of Porirua Harbour on the 8 April 1930, a Monocoupe aeroplane piloted by Mr Morris John CAMERON, manager of a motor firm at Lower Hutt crashed on the tidal flat near Titahi Bay Road. Mr. Cameron received severe injuries through being crushed by the engine, which was forced back upon him as he sat strapped in the cockpit. He was taken by the free ambulance to the Wellington Hospital, where he died at 5.30 p.m. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVII, Issue 20534, 8 April 1930, Page 10

22 May 1930 - With a noise which was heard over a mile away a Moth aeroplane crashed to the ground near the Te Awamutu landing ground at the racecourse at 4.25 p.m on the 22 May 1930. Both occupants died. They were:—
Alfred Trench MINCHIN [MINCHIM], aged 24, single, a carpenter by occupation, fractured skull, died in private hospital.
Captain Alfred William SAUNDERS, aged 40, the pilot, of Auckland, fractured pelvis, shock, severe cuts on the forehead and chin, condition very serious; unconscious when extracated from wreckage. He died the next day. Two machines had been making passenger flights during the day and it is understood this was the final flight. At the time of the accident the aeroplane was proceeding back to the landing ground. The accident occurred in the car-parking area at the entrance to the racecourse, 100 yards from the entrance. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVII, Issue 20570, 22 May 1930, Page 10 and Auckland Star, Volume LXI, Issue 142, 18 June 1930, Page 8.

22 December 1930 - On the 22 December 1930 a Moth machine from the Auckland Aero Club crashed from a height of 2500 feet and burst into flame at Mangere East, Auckland. The pilot, Cyril Herbert Aubrey OLSEN, aged 23 of Royal Oak, aged 23 was killed. Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 150, 23 December 1930, Page 13.

13 February 1931 - On the 13 February 1931 in an accident near Cranwell, Lincolnshire, England to an Atlas aircraft of the Royal Air Force College, Flight-Cadet Arthur Moreland ACTON-ADAMS, was killed, and Flying-Officer Antony Frederick Paul ANNING, the pilot, was fatally injured, dying the same night. Acton-Adams belonged to Kaikoura, New Zealand, and arrived in the middle of 1929 to join the R.A.F. A verdict of accidental death was returned at the inquest at Cranwell. This was noted as the twenty-first death in 1931 caused by accidents to Royal Air Force machines. Including the victims of two civil aeroplane accidents, the death-roll in British aviation since 1931 opened is 26. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVIII, Issue 20829, 23 March 1931, Page 6.

02 May 1931 - New Zealand's first parachute death - The first parachute death occurred at Oamaru when a Norwegian expert, Lieutenant Haakon QVILLER [QUILLER], 35 years, fell 5400 ft. when his parachute failed to open. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXV, Issue 23080, 4 July 1938, Page 10

31 May 1931 - On the 31 May 1931 a Spartan Arrow aeroplane from Christchurch en-route to Wellington crash landed at Woodburne, near Blenheim. The passenger, Cyril Wade CORY-WRIGHT, 37 of Auckland died the next day. The pilot was Francis Victor (Frank) LYSONS of Hawera. He suffered a broken ankle and foot as well as other severe injuries but his condition was reported as satisfactory. Auckland Star, Volume LXII, Issue 127, 1 June 1931, Page 9.

30 October 1931 - Two New Zealanders, Flying-Officers F E [Jack Eugene] MARKBY, 25, and Lewis McHARDY, 27, were killed when a Royal Air Force bombing plane crashed into a tree at Bullwell Lakes, Nottingham, England. The aviators were attached to the Nottingham Bomber Squadron, stationed at the training school at Grantham, and were testing a new type of bomber when the tragedy occurred. A party of women golfing near Bullwell Lakes saw the machine fail to recover after a loop and crash into a tree 40 yards from where they were standing. Auckland Star, Volume LXII, Issue 258, 31 October 1931, Page 11

29 July 1932 - A New Zealander, Flying-Officer Peter Walter Johnston PHARAZYN, was killed when a Wapiti day bomber crashed near Canterbury, Kent. Flying-Officer Pharazyn was an experienced flyer and was unlikely to take unnecessary risks. Probably he was struck by a down draught and brought too low to clear the tree. A verdict of accidental death was returned. Flying-Officer Pharazyn comes from a family with branches in Blenheim and Wellington. He was attached to the Royal Air Force as a special reservist, and belonged to No. 501 Bomber Squadron, stationed at Bristol. For this reason he could not be regarded as a permanent officer of the R.A.F. He was made flying officer in the Special Reserve on May 31, 1930. There are about 200 New Zealanders in the Air Force altogether, and as this is the first fatality in which one has been concerned for at least two years, with the R.A.F.'s annual death roll at from 60 to 80, the general record is certainly remarkable. Auckland Star, Volume LXIII, Issue 179, 30 July 1932, Page 10.

12 October 1932 - Two New Zealanders, Flight-Lieutenant Harold Claude MARETT, 28, and Acting-Pilot Officer Adrian Kinross WHITE, 19, pilot and passenger respectively in a tutor air craft at the Royal Air Force Training School at Grantham, were killed instantly when, the aeroplane suddenly got into a spin and nose-dived. The crash was over the village of Great Ponton, near Grantham, Lincolnshire. Evening Post, Volume CXIV, Issue 90, 13 October 1932, Page 12.

25 October 1932 - Two airmen were killed north of Wellington on the 25 October 1932 when a Moth plane owned by the Wellington Aero Club crashed on the hills near Tawa Flat. The men killed were:
Francis GRESSER, 39, of Wellington
George Bourne Stephen [George Bourne Steven] KING, 30, of Wellington.
The plane, ZK-AAZ, failed to arrive at Rongotai yesterday afternoon, and at 5.30am the next day was found wrecked on the top of Colonial Knob, which is a trig station on the hills to the north of Tawa Flat. The plane was badly smashed, the engine being torn from the fuselage. The wreckage lies about a mile and a half from the main north road, and is visible from Tawa Flat. The hills at the time were covered in mist, and rain was falling steadily. Gresser and King were returning from New Plymouth, and had stopped at Wanganui and Palmerston North. They left Palmerston North at 2.15 p.m. after refuelling, and were seen at Johnsonville shortly after 3 p.m. by a police constable. Mr King was married and employed by Charles Begg and Co. He was an enthusiastic member of the Wellington Aero Club but was not a pilot. Mr Gresser had no relatives in New Zealand. His father and mother are in Australia. Auckland Star, Volume LXIII, Issue 254, 26 October 1932, Page 7.

04 January 1933 - On the 4 January 1933 a Royal Air Force pilot, John Laurance ARMSTRONG, flying a Bulldog machine crashed at Blackmore, Essex, England. He was the elder son of Major James Armstrong of Dannevirke and was 27. He had gone to England in December 1930 to join the Air Force and had been educated at Heretaunga and Christ's College.
LONDON, 14 May 1934 - The body of Flying-Officer Armstrong has been exhumed at his parents' request for reburial in New Zealand. Flying-Officer J L Armstrong, a New Zealander who was killed in a crash while looping the loop at Blackmore, was buried at Hornchurch on January 7, 1933, with Royal Air Force honours, in the presence of many fellow officers, representatives of the Air Ministry, and the High Commissioner, Sir Thomas Wilford. Evening Post, Volume CXVII, Issue 113, 15 May 1934, Page 10.

29 January 1933 - On the 29 January 1933 Richard Guy PUTT, 18, was killed in an aeroplane crash at Pihama, near Opunake, Taranaki. The inquest was adjourned sine die until the pilot, Brian Ford DAVIES has sufficiently recovered from his injuries to give evidence. An aeronautical inquiry will probably be held. Mr Forsyth, over whose home the aeroplane was circling before the crash, said he saw the aeroplane flying over his house, and the flyers signalled to him from the aeroplane. Mr Davies had concussion. Other injuries include a deep cut four inches long in the forehead, and a broken nose. There is no sign of internal injuries. Evening Post, Volume CXV, Issue 25, 31 January 1933, Page 8 and New Zealand Herald, Volume LXX, Issue 21434, 7 March 1933, Page 12.

03 April 1933 - A fatal flying accident resulting in the death of Raymond Eric LAND, aged 19, occurred when a dual control Blackburn Bluebird biplane crashed near the Te Rapa aerodrome at 11 o'clock on the 03 April 1933. Mr Land was a flying pupil of Captain R R Money, a Hamilton aviator. The machine was owned by Mr S J Blackmore, of Hamilton. Mr. Land had received instructions from Captain Money for some months and had done a fair amount of solo flying. The injured man was taken to the Waikato Hospital and underwent an operation, but he died at 5 p.m. Mr LAND was the son of Mr E G Land, of Hinemoa Street, Hamilton, and was employed as a machine room assistant at the office of the Waikato Times. He was a pupil of the Hamilton Technical High School for four years, being a prefect and member of the school's first Rugby fifteen. Upon leaving school, where he was a successful engineering student, he became interested in aviation. He had completed 2 1/2 hours of the five hours' solo flying required for qualification for an A flying licence. He intended to apply for a position in the Royal Air Force. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXX, Issue 21457, 3 April 1933, Page 8.

16 April 1933 - Flying-Officer Lieutenant William Athol Wynne JAMESON, aged 20, an officer in the Royal Air Force, was killed in a flying accident at Suez, according to a private cable. He was the son of Mr S W Jameson, of Christchurch. Educated at Christ's College, Lieut. Jameson passed his aviation examinations brilliantly. He was recently transferred from England to Heliopolis. He was trained in Christchurch. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXX, Issue 21469, 18 April 1933, Page 9

25 July 1933 - NELSON COLLEGE OLD BOY - Cabled advice has been received of the death of Flight-Lieutenant Eric Arthur COLLYNS at Aden on 25 July 1933 as a result of an aircraft accident. He obtained the Governor-General's recommendation to enter the Air Force in England from Nelson College. Flight-Lieutenant Collyns was a son of Mr Guy S Collyns, civil engineer, of Nigeria, British West Africa, and an old boy of Nelson College. Evening Post, Volume CXVI, Issue 31, 5 August 1933, Page 10.

24 September 1933 - On the 24 September 1933 a serious aviation fatality occurred at the Blenheim aerodrome just after midday, when the Marlborough Aero Club's three-seater Hermes-Spartan, piloted by Mr Alexander Escourt WILLIS, with two passengers aboard, struck the ground heavily in landing from Wellington, overturned, and bounced several times before being reduced to a mass of wreckage. One of the passengers, Mr Edgar Thomas MAINDONALD, 29, motor proprietor, of Reefton received severe concussion and other injuries, from which he died early the next day. He left a widow and three children, the eldest five years of age and the youngest eleven months. The other passenger, Mr Bert Ian CUMMINGS, motor driver, of Ikamatua, near Reefton [also noted as of Wakefield, Nelson], has a broken nose and other facial injuries, and many cuts and abrasions. His condition is not regarded as serious. Mr Willis escaped miraculously with minor facial injuries and cuts and abrasions on various parts of the legs and body. Messrs Maindonald and Cummings arrived at Blenheim from the West Coast on Friday evening, and chartered an aeroplane for a visit to Wellington. Evening Post, Volume CXVI, Issue 74, 25 September 1933, Page 8.

20 November 1933 - WESTLAND AIR CRASH - FUNERAL OF VICTIMS - HOKITIKA, This Day.
The funeral of the two victims of the Mt Turiwhati aeroplane tragedy of the 20 November 1933, Messrs James Daniel LYNCH, 66 [a former Mayor of Greymouth], and Jack Bertram RENTON, 24, took place this morning. It was the largest gathering of mourners on record in the town. The whole of the West Coast district was fully represented, and expressions of sympathy were received from all parts of the Dominion. Evening Post, Volume CXVI, Issue 125, 23 November 1933, Page 14 and Evening Post, Volume CXVI, Issue 130, 29 November 1933, Page 10

24 December 1933 - A fatal crash occurred at the Napier Aerodrome on Sunday 24 December 1933 morning, when a pilot, Mr Hugh Clawson CURLETT, 36, who was flying the Hawke's Bay Aero Club's Moth ZK-ACY solo, fell from a little over 100 feet. He sustained concussion, an apparent fracture of the skull, and a compound fracture of the left ankle and died in Napier Hospital on Sunday night. Mr Curlett was a member of tho Hawke's Bay Aero Club, and held a B class commercial flying licence. He was an experienced pilot, trained by the local club. Mr Curlett has a brother, Richard, and a sister, Marie, living at Napier. Another brother is at Auckland. The deceased's wife and child also live at Auckland. This is the first accident in which injury or death has been caused to club members since the club was established over four years ago. Evening Post, Volume CXVI, Issue 152, 26 December 1933, Page 5

29 December 1933 - NEW ZEALAND PILOT'S DEATH. Verdict of Misadventure Returned. LONDON, January 1 1934. At the inquest concerning the death of Flying Officer Ronald Rowley MURPHY, 25, [on the 29 December 1933] of Tokomaru Bay, New Zealand, in an aeroplane crash at Shenfield, Essex, England, a verdict of misadventure was returned. An eye-witness, who gave evidence, stated that when the plane hit the ground it rolled over eight times. An expert said that Murphy had no time to use his parachute, which was found open, probably due to the force with which he was catapulted from his seat. The coroner and jury expressed sympathy with the relatives in New Zealand of the victim. Auckland Star, Volume LXV, Issue 1, 2 January 1934, Page 7.
Flying-Officer Ronald Murphy, who is reported to have been killed, was the third son of the late Mr Rowley Murphy. He was 25 years old and was educated at Christ's College, Christchurch. He went to England in 1931 to join the Royal Air Force. Mrs Nelson C. Pierce, of Orakei Road, Remuera, is a sister of Flying Officer Murphy. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXI, Issue 21688, 2 January 1934, Page 7.

17 March 1934 - A fatal flying crash involving one of the Auckland Aero Club's Moth machines occurred on a hill near the eastern slopes of Mount Hawkins, beyond the Happy Valley Road, not far from the entrance to Wellington Harbour, about 8.45 a.m. on the 17 March 1934. There were lowlying clouds and fog shrouding the hillside at the time. The victims were:
Killed Mr Ernest Roberts BOUCHER, aged 43, married, of 2 Gilgit Avenue, Epsom, president of the Auckland Aero Club, pilot of the machine.
Injured - Mr Leonard Wesley SWAN, aged 38, married, of 297 Remuera Road, secretary of the Auckland Aero Club, passenger.
Mr Boucher's spine was fractured, his right shoulder dislocated, and he also received injuries to the face. He died early this morning while being carried in a stretcher over extremely rough country to an ambulance. Mr Swan received injuries to the neck, facial wounds and shock. He set out to walk for help and reached a cottage at the Red Rocks four hours after leaving the wrecked machine. After telling the story of the crash, he collapsed and was taken to hospital.The machine, ZK-AAL, a Government Moth on loan to the Auckland Aero Club, left Rongotai aerodrome at 8.30 a.m. yesterday for Nelson. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXI, Issue 21753, 19 March 1934, Page 8. Also see Auckland Star, Volume LXVI, Issue 159, 8 July 1935, Page 9 for a later accident to SWAN.

01 May 1934 - A tragic flying accident occurred at Cranwell, near Lincoln, England. A Bulldog fighter, piloted by Flight- Lieutenant Joseph Seymour Tanner, with Flight-Cadet John Aickin PLUGGE, of Taupiri, New Zealand, as passenger, collided in mid-air with a Hart day bomber piloted by Flying-Officer Dennis John Douthwaite, with Flight-Cadet John Askoll Rutherford as passenger. All four were killed. The victims were in a training flight at the time. Flight-Cadet John Aickin PLUGGE was the son of Colonel and Mrs. A. Plugge, of Taupiri. Born just before the Great War, he was baptised in the headquarters tent at the mobilisation camp at Epsom by the regimental chaplain. He began his education at the Taupiri District School. Gaining the Rawlings scholarship, he continued his education at King's College, Auckland. He won a junior national scholarship and at the age of 13 passed the matriculation examination. At King's College he was in the first fifteen in 1931. In the following year he entered the Royal Air Force College at Cranwell, where he did brilliantly in all the college work. In the realm of sport he represented his college at Rugby, cricket and boxing. He was sub-editor of the "Cranwellian" and a cadet noncommissioned officer, and was due to "pass out" next month. Two brothers of deceased are also serving in England; the elder, Lieutenant A J P Plugge. R.N., is at present on the Solent for a 10 months flying course. The younger, R Plugge, is at the Royal Naval College at Dartmouth.
The records of the six young New Zealanders who have entered the Cranwell College with the object of_ obtaining permanent commissions in the Air Force is as follows:
Flight-Officer WALL lost an eye on the North-West Frontier and is now stores officer at Cranwell.
Flight-Cadet ACTON-ADAMS was killed at Cranwell in an aeroplane accident.
Pilot-Officer COLLYNS was killed in a crash abroad.
Pilot-Officers BROUGHTON and NELSON are still serving.
The sixth was Flight-Cadet Plugge. The two machines concerned in the crash are both standard equipment of different Royal Air Force Squadrons. The Hawker Hart is a two-seater daybomber, but the Bristol Bulldog, a fighter, is best known as a singleseater. It is understood, however, that at various training aerodromes twoseater models of the Bulldog are in use, and it is thought likely that dual instruction was being given when the collision occurred. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXI, Issue 21790, 3 May 1934, Page 9.

24 May 1934 - DEATHS - WILLIAMS — On 24 May 1934 at Andover, England, Flying-Officer George Elyton SLOAN (killed in air crash), dearly loved youngest son of the late George Albert and Ellen Williams, 173 Tinakori Road. Deeply mourned. Evening Post, Volume CXVII, Issue 123, 26 May 1934, Page 1. He was an old boy of Wellington College and the thirteenth New Zealand death in the Royal Air Force in three and a half years.New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXI, Issue 21810, 26 May 1934, Page 13

31 July 1934 - A serious flying accident involving a New Zealand pilot occurred at Dundee, Scotland on 31 July 1934. Two passengers were killed, but the pilot, Flying-Officer John Annesley HANKINS, escaped with only slight injuries. Mr Hankins, whose home town is Wellington, and who was educated at Wellington College, was formerly a member of the Army Co-operation Squadron, at Palmerston North. He came to London at the end of 1929 and joined the Royal Air Force at the beginning of 1930. In February, 1931, he left from the Training School with a distinguished pass, and was with No. 4 Squadron at Farnborough, Kent, for a time. He was promoted to instructor and then went to the 208 (A.C.) Squadron at Heliopolis. The passengers were Miss Nan Craighead, aged 16, of Dundee, and Mr Stewart Campbell, aged 30, eldest son of Mr. R Campbell, provision merchant, of Perth. Both died of their injuries on the day of the crash. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXI, Issue 21900, 8 September 1934, Page 8.

14 September 1934 - The Western Federated Aero Club's Moth aeroplane ZK-ABS, with two occupants crashed on a shoulder of the Pouakai Ranges or on the northern side of Mount Egmont [near New Plymouth]. The occupants of the machine were:
Mr James Alexander AUSTIN, 37, passenger, of New Plymouth
Mr Stanley William GREEN, single, aged 26 [31], pilot, of New Plymouth
Mr Austin is a son of Mr and Mrs James Austin, of Mangorei Road, New Plymouth. He carried on business as a photographic specialist in New Plymouth, where he is well known. He has made many aerial trips over the mountain in quest of novel subjects. He had arranged with Mr Green to make the trip to-day over the mountain to obtain photographs with new infra red plates used in distance photography. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXI, Issue 21905, 14 September 1934, Page 10

22 October 1934 - A double tragedy marred the Centenary Air Race when Flying-Officer Harold Darwin GILMAN, of Auckland, and his British companion, Mr J K C BAINES, who was known in New Zealand flying circles, crashed in a mountainous region of Southern Italy. The machine suddenly went into a nose-dive at a height of 5000 ft and burst into flames when it struck the ground. INTERMENT OF VICTIMS FUNERAL IN NAPLES - 26 October - The British Consul-General, Mr G A Fisher, Colonel Hetherington, representing the Air Ministry and the Royal Aero Club, and the entire British colony attended the funeral of Flying-Officer H D Gilman, of New Zealand, and Mr J K C Baines, the airmen who were killed when their machine crashed last week. The Anglican Church in Naples was decorated with the Italian and British colours. Masses of flowers covered the coffins, which were carried by Italian Air Force officers, who formed a guard of honour. During the service Miss Edith Wilson, Mr Gilman's fiancee, placed her engagement ring on the coffin and knelt beside it, grief-stricken. After the service the Fascist militia carried the coffins to the Anglican cemetery, where they were interred. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXI, Issue 21943, 29 October 1934, Page 9 and Evening Post, Volume CXVIII, Issue 129, 28 November 1934, Page 15

19 November 1934 - DEATHS - BINLEY - On 19 November 1934, result of an air crash at Bombay, Alan, dearly beloved brother of Mrs T Watson, Onauku and Mary and W Binley, 23 Tiber Street, Island Bay. Evening Post, Volume CXVIII, Issue 122, 20 November 1934, Page 1
Flight-Lieutenant A BINLEY, a New Zealander, instructor to the Bombay Flying Club, was fatally injured to-day in a crash at Juhu aerodrome. Flight-Lieutenant Binley recently conducted an instructional flight of four young Indian members of the Bombay Club to England and back. An Englishman named Ring was piloting the machine which crashed. Deceased was a clever boxer. He played in the Rugby trial for the All Blacks' tour of 1927. His mother at present is in Melbourne, on her way to visit him. The late Flight-Leiutenant Alan Binley was educated at Marlborough College, Blenheim. He joined the staff of the Bank of New South Wales in Blenheim, and later was transferred to Wanganui. He resigned from the bank in 1927 and went to England, with the idea of qualifying for the Royal Air Force. After four years' service with the Air Force, Flight-Lieutenant Binley paid a brief holiday visit to New Zealand, arriving in December, 1931. He was then stationed in Palestine, under Flight-Lieutenant Atcherley, a noted Schneider Trophy pilot. The New Zealander planned to make a flight from England to Australia in four days, to be followed by a flight from Australia to New Zealand, if he could raise the necessary finance while in the Dominion. He proposed to use a Lockheed Vega machine, similar to that chosen by Colonel Charles Lindbergh for his great Japan flight. The scheme, however, did not materialise.New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXI, Issue 21962, 20 November 1934, Page 9

24 November 1934 - The Dunedin aeroplane ZK ACE crashed at St Andrew's, ten miles southwest by train from Timaru, at 9.30am, in a fog. Details of killed and injured are as follow:
Killed - Mr Howard Wentworth BAILEY, aged 49, passenger in the plane, married, employed as chief auctioneer for Stonach and Morris, stock agents, Dunedin. Deceased was well known as an amateur entertainer. He resided with his wife at Anderson's Bay, Dunedin. There are no children.
Injured - Mr Frank Cecil TAYLOR, pilot, employed as accountant in the office of the Perpetual Trustees Company. Mr. Taylor holds an endorsed A certificate. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXI, Issue 21967, 26 November 1934, Page 10 and Evening Post, Volume CXVIII, Issue 142, 13 December 1934, Page 13

29 November 1934 - A Te Aroha aerial pageant was terminated when two aeroplanes collided and as the result of the crash which followed, one pilot was killed and the other injured, although not seriously. Details are:
Killed - Mr Clarence Clifton WAITE, aged 28 years, married, of Te Aroha
Injured - Mr Stanley James BLACKMORE, aged 40, of Hamilton
Mr Waite and Mr Blackmore were piloting a Gipsy Moth biplane and a Desoutter monoplane respectively, and were engaged in a dog-fight when the two machines collided in mid-air and fell to the ground. About 300 people attended the pageant, which was held on Mr. G Goodfellow's farm at Waihou. The weather was fine, and there was a slight southerly breeze. It had been arranged that two Gipsy Moths should take part in a dogfight as one of the spectacular items on the programme, but a second Moth was not available. In order not to disappoint the gathering Mr Blackmore agreed to engage Mr Waite in mimic combat in his Desoutter, which is a much heavier machine than the Moth and not quite suitable for the purpose. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXI, Issue 21970, 29 November 1934, Page 10

19 January 1935 - Canterbury Aero Club's de Havilland Moth machine came down in the sea near Waipara while flying between Wellington and Christchurch. The pilot, Richard Noel ROAKE, 37, of Christchurch was drowned, but the passenger, Mr Cecil HAIGH, swam ashore unhurt. The machine was completely wrecked and its position, about seven miles north of the Waipara River, was so remote and inaccessible that no salvage was considered possible. At low tide the tail projected a few feet above the water. Evening Post , Issue 17, 21 January 1935, Page 10

18 March 1935 - New Zealanders Flying-Officer George Edward Bullen NIXON and acting-Pilot-Officer Colin KIRKLEY, were killed at Digby,near Scopwick, Lincolnshire, England. Mr Kirkley was undergoing instruction at the No. 2 Flying School, Digby, where Flying-Officer Nixon was instructor. The aeroplane was soaring at a height of 2000 ft. and in an inverted position when, according to an eyewitness, a portion broke off. The machine plunged to earth disintegrating as it fell.
Acting Pilot-Officer Colin Kirkley was a son of Mr and Mrs C Kirkley, Duke Street, Hastings, and had been in the Royal Air Force only a few weeks. For some time he was a flying member of the Hawke's Bay and East Coast Aero Club, and took his "A" pilot's licence before going to England. Flight-Lieutenant Gerrand, instructor of the club described him as an able and promising young pilot, and one of the keenest and most popular members of the club. He was also a splendid swimmer, and was a well-known performer at local swimming carnivals. Flying-Officer Nixon had been in the Royal Air Force for some years. Flying-Officer Gordon White, of Hastings, who knew him in England, described him as a pilot of considerable skill and experience. He was also a boxer of distinction, and had previously served with a fighter squadron at Kenley aerodrome, near London.
Flying-Officer Nixon, of Christchurch, was an old boy of the Waitaki High School. He joined the R.A.F. in 1930, and was stationed at Kenley, Surrey, and afterwards at Biggen Hill. From the autumn of 1932 to the spring of 1934 he was at Hinaidi, Irak, returning in the latter year to Wittering, Northamptonshire. He went to the Digby camp when it was reopened in October last year. The two New Zealanders were buried with full military honours at Scopwich Churchyard,, about a mile and a half from Digby. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXII, Issue 22063, 20 March 1935, Page 11 and Evening Post, Volume CXIX, Issue 85, 10 April 1935, Page 12

28 April 1935 - Mr Arthur SEBAG-MONTEFIORE was piloting his own aeroplane with Mr G Steavenson as passenger, when he crashed from 300 ft owing to the engine stalling while attempting to land on Manston aerodrome, near Ramsgate, Kent, England. Mr. Steavenson was killed instantly, and Mr. Sebag- Montefiore died in hospital. He was a nephew of Viscount Bearsted and was 23 years of age. He was married in 1932 to Jacqueline, daughter of Mr and Mrs David NATHAN, of Auckland, and leaves one son. Mr Sebag-Montefiore was a keen airman. He narrowly escaped from a blazing 'plane when flying with his brother last July. Auckland Star, Volume LXVI, Issue 99, 29 April 1935, Page 7

20 June 1935 - Mrs Esther Jane NEWMAN [New Zealand's first female air fatality?] was killed at Waiho, 95 miles south of Hokitika when a Gipsy Moth plane ZK ADO crashed. The pilot, Harold Thomas LAWN of Hokitika was able to jump out almost as soon as the plane came down. Mr Lawn, who is a son of Mr A H Lawn, hairdresser, of Hokitika, is a member of the West Coast Aero Club and holds a B license. Mrs Newman, an elderly woman [58], was the widow of Mr William Newman, of Newman's Motors, Hokitika. Auckland Star, Volume LXVI, Issue 144, 20 June 1935, Page 8

21 July 1935 - Francis (also known as Hamish) ARMSTRONG, 31, of Akitio near Dannevirke died when he apparently lost his way in fog while flying to Hastings, Hawkes Bay. The search concentrated on the area between the Kaimanawas and the Kaiwekas.
A Tragic History - The Armstrong family has had a tragic connection with aviation. In January 1933, a cousin of Mr Hamish Armstrong, Mr John Armstrong, a member of the Royal Air Force, was the victim of a fatal crash in England, while Mrs Kight, widow of Flight-Lieutenant Ivan L Kight, a solicitor, of Dannevirke, who was killed in an aeroplane accident at Wairoa on February 8, 1931, is also a cousin. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXII, Issue 22169, 24 July 1935, Page 10
The Triplex Hut in the Ruahine Ranges originates from the finding of a shirt labelled "XXX" which was the only clue found of a missing pilot (Hamish Armstrong) who crashed into the ranges above Sunrise Hut in 1935. See TRIPLEX HUT

09 October 1935 - Pilot-Officer Haldane GEORGESON, of the Royal Air Force, was killed in a crash at Calshot, Southahmpton Water, Hampshire, England, was 21 years old, and the son of Mr George Georgeson, of Invercargill. He attended the Southland Boys High School from 1927 to 1931, and was a splendid all-round athlete. In 1932 he was awarded a flying scholarship, and in 1933, on the recommendation of the New Zealand Government, he was granted a commission in the Royal Air Force and left for England. There he made quick progress. With two other pilots he broke the bombing record for the squadron to which he belonged. He was a member of the squadron's Rugby fifteen and captain of the cricket eleven, and reached the final at his weight at boxing. In a letter received by his father yesterday, Pilot-Officer Georgeson said he had been promoted to flight-lieutenant in charge of the second squadron. Auckland Star, Volume LXVI, Issue 239, 9 October 1935, Page 20

19 February 1936 - Striking the anemometer mast when gliding down to land at Rongotai aerodrome, the Union Airways Miles Falcon private charter taxi monoplane crashed to ground up-side down, and the pilot, Squadron-leader Malcolm Charles McGREGOR, 39, received injuries from which he died in the Wellington Hospital about two hours later. The only passenger, Mr Charles William Feild HAMILTON, a young sheepfarmer of Irishman's Creek Station, Fairlie, South Canterbury, escaped with slight abrasions to the right wrist and face and a cut above his right eye. Mr Hamilton arrived from the South Island by the inter-island express steamer yesterday morning on a hurried business visit to Hamilton, and for this purpose he engaged the Miles Falcon monoplane, piloted by Mr A V [Allen Victor] JURY. He flew the same day from Rongotai to Hamilton, where he stayed last night. He left Hamilton with Mr Jury on the southward journey at about noon today, but at Palmerston North Squadron-Leader McGregor relieved Mr Jury as pilot for the remaining stage of the journey to Wellington, as in his opinion flying conditions were decidedly risky, and he considered it was his duty as service manager of Union Airways to undertake the flight himself. Palmerston North was left shortly after two o'clock, and making the last stage of the trip via the coastline, Squadron-Leader McGregor was about to bring the monoplane down to land when its right wing caught the anemometer mast. Heavy rain was falling at the time of the accident. The crash was heard by the officials at the aerodrome, and within a few seconds they were on the spot and had extricated Squadron-Leader McGregor and Mr Hamilton from underneath the upturned monoplane, which had crashed several yards from the anemometer mast. This mast stands near the main roadway on the Seatoun side of the aerodrome buildings.
One of the "War Birds" born at Hunterville 40 years ago, Squadron-Leader McGregor, M.C., D.F.C. and bar, learned to fly at Walsh Brothers' school, Kohimarama, and left for England in 1916 to join the Royal Air Force. After becoming a pilot in Major W A Bishop's famous 85th Squadron, the activities of which were described in the well-known book "War Birds," in which he is frequently mentioned. While at the front he won the M.C., D.F.C. and bar, and scored a considerable number of victories over German machines. Returning to the Dominion, Squadron-Leader McGregor took up farming, but when the Gipsy Moth machine was produced in 1928 he returned to aviation, and spent the next two years passenger flying in every part of New Zealand, becoming a most popular figure. Later he conducted a passenger service from Christehurch to Dutiedin. He was selected by the Government to carry out experimental mail flights in 1931 from Auckland to Invercargill, Wellington to Hokitika, and Hawke's Bay to Wellington. He was also associated with the late Sir Charles Kingsford Smith. He joined the Manawatu Aero Club in 1932 as pilot instructor, but at an Aero Club pageant he had the misfortune to crash while giving a balloon bursting exhibition, and was for a lengthy period in hospital. On his recovery he resumed duty as pilot instructor, and later he was selected with Mr H C Walker, the club captain, to pilot the Miles Hawk machine in the Melbourne Centenary Air Race, in which they established a light aeroplane record for the world and secured fifth place. He relinquished his position as instructor on his appointment to the staff of Union Airways as service manager. He leaves a widow and four children, two girls and two boys. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXIII, Issue 22348, 20 February 1936, Page 10

25 February 1936 - Flying-Officer Graham Mackellar OWEN, aged 23, of Owen's Road, Epsom, Auckland, died in Christchurch Hospital after his aeroplane crashed into the sandy shore of Lake Ellesmere [New Zealand Air Force's first death?]. The machine, a Bristol fighter, owned by the New Zealand Air Force, was ruined beyond repair, the engine being the only substantial part salvaged. Flying-Officer Owen was the only occupier of the aeroplane. He was a member of No. 1 A. C. Squadron of the New Zealand Territorial Air Force, which draws its personnel mainly from Auckland. The squadron began a ten days' refresher course at Wigram a week ago. Today the squadron flew in seven aeroplanes to carry out machine-gun practice from the air. On the north side of Lake Ellesmere a bombing target was placed on the shore, and Flying-Officer Owen swooped down from a height of 1000 feet to pump shots into it, but instead of the machine coming out of the dive at 200 feet it failed to straighten out, dived nose first into the sandy mud, and finally came to rest about 45 yards from where it first struck. The undercarriage was ripped off, the aeroplane turned over on its back, and somersaulted again. Flying-Officer Owen had not fired a shot. Evening Post, Issue 48, 26 February 1936, Page 12 and Evening Post, Issue 51, 29 February 1936, Page 13

28 March 1936 - Pilot-Officer James Simpson ("Scotty") FRASER, 40 years, of Palmerston North, met a tragic and terrible death at the Rongotai aerodrome when his parachute failed to open when he was giving an exhibition jump as a feature of the McGregor benefit air pageant. He fell 1400 feet or more and crashed into the sea about 150 yards from the beach line, off the end of Kingsford Smith Street...Evening Post , Issue 76, 30 March 1936, Page 12

24 May 1936 - Walter Martin O'HARA, crashed shortly after taking off at Eumungerie, 315 miles west of Sydney. The aeroplane caught fire. Stalling of the engine is believed to be the cause of the plane's nose-dive. The machine was completely destroyed. Born at Thames in 1899, Mr O'Hara was the eldest son of Mrs Mary O'Hara and the late Mr Patrick O'Hara, of Wharepoa, Thames Valley, who arrived from Ireland in the late 'nineties. After education at Kopti and other Thames Valley schools, Mr O'Hara studied at Sydney University. He was attached to the machine-gun corps, New Zealand Expeditionary Force, during the Great War, enlisting as a private, and being promoted to commissioned rank before the war ended. Since the war Mr O'Hara had been living at Dampit, Java, where he had interests in rubber and coffee plantations. Auckland Star, Volume LXVII, Issue 122, 25 May 1936, Page 7 and Evening Post, Volume CXXI, Issue 131, 4 June 1936, Page 9

30 December 1936 - A Fox Moth aeroplane carrying five persons crashed in the surf while attempting a landing at Big Bay, west coast of the South Island, one passenger being killed and all the other occupants injured. The machine was taking a party to Franz Josef Glacier and was making a halt to drop one passenger at the trampers hut at Big Bay on the west coast, about 30 miles north of Milford Sound. As the aeroplane was landing it apparently stalled, and eye-witnesses saw it nose-dive into the surf from a considerable height. The victims were:
Walter Sutton JONES, aged 21, journalist, employed by the Southland Daily News, killed. He was a son of Mr Walter Jones, editor of the Daily News.
Sister Catherine BUCKINGHAM, of the nursing staff of the Southland Hospital, fractured right thigh, fractured left forearm, fractured pelvis and scalp wounds.
Mr George ROSS, aged 31, of Clyde Street, Invercargill, employed by Carswell and Company, Limited, fractured left thigh.
Mr W E HUNT, of Wallacetown, son of Sir William Hunt, severe bruises.
Mr Arthur John BRADSHAW, of Beatrice Street, Invercargill, pilot of the aeroplane, severely cut head.
Three of the injured were admitted to hospital in Invercargill on Thursday evening, and the fourth, Mr Hunt, entered a private hospital on Friday. Auckland Star, Volume LXVIII, Issue 1, 2 January 1937, Page 11 and Auckland Star, Volume LXVIII, Issue 216, 11 September 1937, Page 23

25 January 1937 - Miss Harriet Jane COLEY who was killed in a crash at Mascot Aerodrome, Sydney came from New Zealand. She was one of the two passengers in Miss May Bradford's Klemm Eagle machine, which struck a de Soutter aeroplane when taking off and burst into flames. Bradford was also killed and the third victim was Miss Ellen Latimer, who recently arrived in Australia from England. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXIV, Issue 22636, 26 January 1937, Page 9
Australia Death Index, 1787-1985, Name: Harriett Jane Coley, Death Date: 1937, Death Place: New South Wales, Mother's name: Elizabeth Jane, Registration Year: 1937, Registration Place: Redfern, New South Wales,Registration Number: 572

21 January 1937 - A former Aucklander, Captain Eric George STEWART lost his life when attempting to fly the Irish Channel in an 80 miles an hour gale. The machine crashed into tho sea 25 miles off the Mersey Bar, striking the forerigging of a collier as it fell. Captain Stewart, who had neglected to use a lifebelt, was drowned, but his mechanic, Mr C Poole, of Cheltenham, was rescued. Captain Stewart had enjoyed an outstanding career. He served during the Great War with the Royal Flying Corps, and gained a Military Cross for his skill and courage as a fighting pilot. In 1925 he was in Ismalia with an R.A.F. Flying School and for three years was flying in Egypt and Irak. In January of 1927 he was one of two pilots of two Victoria machines which flew from Bagdad to India as an escort to Sir Samuel Hoare. Later he joined Imperial Airways, and did pioneer work on the Empire air route to the East, when he opened the Cairo-Basra section of the line to India. He was working for an aircraft advertising firm when he started out on his last flight. Captain Stewart leaves a wife and child. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXIV, Issue 22654, 16 February 1937, Page 12. Eric George STEWART born 12 May 1907 Te Aroha, Waikato - son of George and Elizabeth STEWART. Also http://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/wiki.php?id=34402

08 February 1937 - Without warning of any kind Sister Viva Maud FARMAR, single, aged 51, of the nursing staff of the Wairau Hospital, plunged to her death after forcing open the door of a Marlborough Aero Club aeroplane and stepping out into space 2500 feet above Cook Strait. Sister Farmar, herself a highly qualified air pilot, was the only passenger in the machine, which was flying to Wellington, piloted by Mr. A E Willis...New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXIV, Issue 22648, 9 February 1937, Page 8

23 March 1937 - A De Havilland Moth Plane belonging to the Western Federated Aero Club disappeared over the Cook Strait returning from a pageant at Hokitika. The plane was piloted by Arthur Carrington SMITH, 24, of Pungarehu, near Opunake, Taranaki and James HAMILL, 17, of Pungarehu, who was the passenger. Auckland Star, Volume LXVIII, Issue 225, 22 September 1937, Page 12 [These deaths do not appear to be registered.]

25 March 1937 - Errol Warrington COLVIN, aged 22 years, who resided with his parents at 60 Forth Street, Dunedin, and was a member of the Otago Aero Club died when the Club's de Havilland Gypsy Moth aeroplane crashed in a paddock near Wylie's Crossing, on the Taieri Plain. Colvin was a popular member of the club and an airman of considerable promise. A pupil of the club's pilot instructor, Flying-Officer D. Campbell, he had nine hours' flying experience to his credit, and was the holder of an A licence. Evening Post, Volume CXXIII, Issue 72, 27 March 1937, Page 14

02 June 1937 - A Wellington Aero Club's Miles Hawk monoplane crashed into a hillside near Pembroke Road, Stratford, Taranaki, killing passenger, Philip Joseph NATHAN, 68, and injuring the pilot, Mr C H [Charles Colin] DUNFORD. After the inquest had opened, the body of Mr Nathan was taken to Wellington. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXIV, Issue 22746, 4 June 1937, Page 10 and Auckland Star, Volume LXVIII, Issue 196, 19 August 1937, Page 27 and Evening Post, Volume CXXIV, Issue 72, 22 September 1937, Page 13

20 November 1937 - Flying-Officer Lancelot Frances Jamisson TAYLOR, of the Royal Air Force, was killed on Saturday when his machine crashed outside the airport at Ottawa. Mr Taylor, who was the only son of Mr and Mrs W L Taylor, Invercargill, was a pupil of the Southland Boys' High School from 1923 to 1926. He had a fine record at school, both scholastically and in the sporting field. On leaving school he became an engineering student at Canterbury University College with the intention of taking up civil engineering. He then became interested in flying and in 1927 was selected as a flying cadet for the New Zealand Air Force. Two years later he was commissioned as a second lieutenant. He gained promotion and was appointed to the Royal Air Force. Mr Taylor later saw service in England, and at the Singapore Base. For some time he was instructor of a bombing squadron in England, and onlv recently was ordered to Canada for special duty. Auckland Star, Volume LXVIII, Issue 278, 23 November 1937, Page 21

03 December 1937 - Ridley Lenderyon ELLIOTT, aged 22, of Palmerston North, died at the Wellington Public Hospital on December 3 from multiple injuries sustained through the Manawatu and Middle Districts Aero Club's Moth aeroplane ZK-ABV crashing near the Rongotai aerodrome. The pilot, Mr William SMILLIE was injured. Evening Post, Volume CXXIV, Issue 150, 22 December 1937, Page 15

17 December 1937 - One Royal Air Force pilot was killed, one dangerously injured and two slightly in an accident with a bomber at Honington. One of the pilots slightly injured in the crash at Hornington was Pilot-Officer Laurence McFARLANE, son of Mr H O McFarlane, of Dunedin, says a Press Association message from Dunedin. A cablegram received by Mr. McFarlane from the Air Ministry stated that his son was suffering from bruises and abrasions, and had had a remarkable escape from serious injury. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXIV, Issue 22916, 20 December 1937, Page 11

December 1937 - AIR FIGHTERS - FOREIGN SQUADRON AMERICAN'S CRASH SERVICE WITH CHINESE NEW ZEALAND FLIER - The Hongkong correspondent of the Daily Telegraph says the existence of an international air squadron for service with the Chinese Government is revealed by one of its members, who has arrived at Hongkong to recuperate after crashing in a fight with Japanese aeroplanes near Hankow. He is a native of New York and goes under the name of Robert Wherton. "There are 20 of us, and we fight for a living," he said. "There were 22, but two have gone. We Americans cannot use our right names, or we would lose our citizenship. "There are two Australians in the squadron. Messrs. White and Whitehead, the latter of whom flew the Tasman."
The Mr Whitehead mentioned above is Mr Raymond Galbraith WHITEHEAD, aged 27, a New Zealander who has led an adventurous life in the past few years. He was at one time a Wellington journalist. In November, 1934, he flew the Tasman with Mr Rex Nicol, of Manly. Afterward he became a commercial pilot in Australia, and early this year he flew for a commercial airline in New Guinea. A cablegram published in the Herald on October 13 announced that with Mr W VYNER-WHITE he had accepted service in China. His father, Mr A P Whitehead, of Wellington, said in the course of a telephone conversation last night that he had not heard from his son since he arrived at Hongkong in October, when he said he had a six months' contract to fly in the service of the Chinese Government. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXIV, Issue 22916, 20 December 1937, Page 11

21 January 1938 - Two New Zealanders, flying an instructional aeroplane from the Royal Air Force Reserve School at Hatfield, Hertfordshire came into collision with a Royal Air Force Gloster Gauntlet with three deaths. The victims were:
Mr Theodore Quintin Paviour SMITH, aged 30, formerly of Dannevirke, flying instructor at the school.
Mr Brian William GRIEVES, aged 22, of Carlton Gore Road, Auckland, who had just begun training after coming from New Zealand with a view to securing a short service commission in the Royal Air Force.
Pilot-Officer Leonard Rene HELPS, aged 23, of the 66th Fighter Squadron, Duxford, pilot of the Gloster machine.
Mr Greives funeral was held with Air Force honours at St. Mark's Churchyard, Colney Heath. The casket, draped with a Union Jack, was borne by men of the Royal Air Force. After the committal service three volleys were fired by a firing party and the Last Post and Reveille were sounded. The High Commissioner was represented by Mr E A Broadbridge, and representatives were also present from the Royal Air Force and the Hatfield Flying School. The funeral of Mr Smith took place at the Islington Borough Cemetery, East Finchley. The High Commissioner was represented by Mr S R Skinner and the Royal Air Force by Squadron-Leader Hickey. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXV, Issue 22963, 15 February 1938, Page 14

27 January 1938 - Pilot Officer Alan Norman MACFARLANE of Clydevale, near Balclutha, Otago was killed at Tattershall Thorpe, near Horncastle, Lincolnshire on January 27. He was attached to 44 (B) Squadron, Royal Air Force and was stationed at the Waddington Aerodrome, Lincolnshire. Pilot Officer Macfarlane left New Zealand in November 1935 and he entered the Royal Air Force in February of the following year. He paid a visit to London just a few days before he was killed. Pilot Officer Macfarlane's funeral took place at Waddington Church yesterday afternoon with full Air Force honours. The band from the Royal Air Force College at Cranwell and a firing party were in attendance. The High Commissioner, Mr W J Jordan, was represented by Mr E A Broadbridge. Evening Post, Volume cxxv, Issue 46, 24 February 1938, Page 6

21 February 1938 - An accident occurred a mile and a half from the private airport on the ranch owned by Mr W R Hearst, the newspaper magnate, at San Simeon, California. The coast had been under a blanket of fog all day and the pilot of the machine lost his direction. The machine crashed when he was groping for a landing. The victims were:—
Lord PLUNKET [Terence Conyngham Plunket], son of former Governor of New Zealand.*
Lady PLUNKET [Dorothι Mabel Lewis, was the illegitimate daughter of the actress Fannie Ward and 7th Marquess of Londonderry].
Mr T J Phillips, pilot of the aeroplane.
Injured - Mr James Lawrence, companion of Lord Plunket, severe burns and a compound fracture of one ankle.
Lord and Lady Plunket and Mr Lawrence had arrived at New York on February 22 on the liner Queen Mary, and were flying from Los Angeles to San Simeon, where they were to be the guests of Mr. Hearst. The machine was one of Mr. Hearst's private air fleet and the pilot was in his employ. Lord Plunket, who was the sixth baron, was the eldest son of the 5th Baron Plunket, Governor of New Zealand from 1901 to 1910, and Baroness Plunket, the youngest daughter of the 1st Marquess of Dufferin and Ava. He was born in July 1899, and succeeded to the title in 1920. After passing through Sandhurst he received a commission in the Rifle Brigade. Lady Plunket, a daughter of the late Mr Joseph Lewis, was formerly the widow of Captain Jack Barnato, of the Royal Air Force. She was married to Lord Plunket in 1922. There are three sons. The heir to the title is the Hon. Patrick Terence William Span Plunket, who was born in September, 1923. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXV, Issue 22973, 26 February 1938, Page 13 * William Lee Plunket, 5th Baron Plunket, GCMG, KCVO, KBE (19 December 1864 — 24 January 1920) was a British diplomat and administrator. He was Governor of New Zealand from 1904 to 1910.

27 February 1938 - A Canterbury Aero Club pilot was killed when the aeroplane in which he was performing aerobatics over the Prebbleton district apparently failed to straighten out after a spin and crashed into a paddock. The victim was:
Mr Clifford Albert BURMISTER, single, aged 22, of 244 Gloucester Street, Christchurch.
The machine, a new Miles Magister monoplane, valued at £1900, was almost a total wreck. Mr. Burmister was a surveyor employed in the Christchurch office of the Public Works Department. He was a trainee of the Canterbury Aero Club under the Government civil reserve scheme and had done about 22 hours flying, including some 10 hours solo work. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXV, Issue 22974, 28 February 1938, Page 10

29 March 1938 - The Air Ministry has advised Mr H J Hobbs, of Peterborough Street, Christchurch, that his son, Flight-Lieutenant Reginald Henry HOBBS, is missing and is presumed to have lost his life when the Royal Air Force flying-boat crashed into the sea during manoeuvres off Brest. Flight-Lieutenant Hobbs is the only child of Mr Hobbs, and was born in Christchurch 28 years ago. He was educated at Christ's College, and on leaving school was employed by various Christchurch firms before leaving in December 1930 to take up a commission in the Royal Air Force. He was stationed in England from then until the present time. Flight-Lieutenant Hobbs was married in 1936. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXV, Issue 23001, 31 March 1938, Page 13

18 April 1938 - A Hornet Moth machine belonging to the Hawke's Bay and East Coast Aero Club crashed four miles from Matapiro at 12.20pm. [Crownthorpe Settlement, about 23 miles from Hastings]. The victims were: -
Miss Nellie ARNOTT, aged about 35 years, Plunket nurse, of Pakowhai, pilot of the machine [New Zealand's first female pilot fatality?]
Mr Roy [Robert Bowie Chesterhope] ARNOTT, single, also of Pakowhai.
Miss Arnott received her flying instruction as a member of the club, and some time ago had her ticket endorsed to allow her to make passenger flights. She was considered to be a very cool pilot and had formerly had no mishaps. The parents of the victims, John Bowie and Mary Ann ARNOTT live at Pakowhai. Evening Post, Volume CXXV, Issue 91, 19 April 1938, Page 10

25 April 1938 - Mr Colin Calder BYAR, who was trapped in the cabin of his aeroplane when it crashed near Woodcote, Wallington, Surrey, England, on Tuesday, died three days later [29 April 1938]as a result of the head injuries he received. Mr Byar's home was in Dunedin. He was the son of Mrs Mary Byar, of Belleknowes, and of the late Mr. William Price Byar, of Little River. Deceased was educated at the Otago Boys' High School. He was successful in obtaining his A pilot's licence while still at school, and was one of the youngest and most promising pilots to be trained by the Otago Aero Club. Deceased, who was aged 25 years, went to England shortly after leaving school, and was successful in obtaining a short-term commission in the Royal Air Force. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXV, Issue 23025, 30 April 1938, Page 16. Ernest RATCLIFFE, also of New Zealand was injured in the accident. Evening Post, Volume CXXV, Issue 97, 27 April 1938, Page 11 and Evening Post, Volume CXX, Issue 119, 23 May 1938, Page 8

06 May 1938 - Acting Pilot-Officer Errol Desmond GIMSON, aged 21, of Christchurch, New Zealand was killed at 11.30pm on the 6 May at Sealand, Flintshire, Scotland. Gimson was a pupil and had had a fair amount of experience and had received instruction in night flying and had made satisfactory landings. On Friday he was ordered to carry out two night landings. He made the first one perfectly, but on the second occasion tho machine bounced slightly, rose again and went out of sight. The funeral took place at Sealand on May 10. The High Commissioner for New Zealand, who was in Geneva, was represented by Mr E A Broadbridge. This is recorded to be the 40th fatal Royal Air Force accident this year. Yesterday eight flying deaths were recorded. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXV, Issue 23048, 27 May 1938, Page 16

10 May 1938 - A Union Airways machine Lockheed AFC Kotare crashed one mile west of the Mangere Aerodrome at 12.20pm after taking off for Wellington. The victims were:
Flight-Lieutenant Cyril Mercer DUTHIE - Flight-Lieutenant Duthie was born on January 19, 1908. He was appointed in June 1935, to the position of pilot instructor to the Manawatu Aero Club, previously held by Squadron-Leader M C McGregor. Mr Duthie, who then held a "B" licence, intended to take a short training course at Wigram for his instructor's licence. He took up his duties in Palmerston North at the beginning of July. He was co-pilot, with Mr B A Blythe, of the Lockheed Electra monoplane Kuaka, which flew from Auckland to Wellington and back in June, 1937. Mr. Duthie was appointed to Union Airways in December, 1935, as a co-pilot. He was promoted pilot in March, 1936. Flight-Lieutenant Duthie's flying training was received while he was a member of the Wellington Aero Club. He gained his licence in May, 1930, and an endorsed licence in September of the same year. His "B" licence was issued in May, 1931. He had about 2500 flying hours to his credit. He served for several years as a member of the 15th Battery, and was a first class rifle shot, winning the battery championship belt. Flight-Lieutenant Duthie, who was aged 30, was married a few months ago. His widow is at present spending a holiday at Feilding with his parents. Flight-Lieutenant Duthie was in the Palmerston North-Dunedin service before the service was extended to Auckland about a year ago. One of the company's senior pilots, he had long flying experience.
Second-Officer William John PEEL was born on February 8, 1914. He joined Union Airways at Palmerston North in June, 1937, as a second officer. Mr Peel had about 600 hours' flying experience. He was trained by the Hawke's Bay East Coast Aero Club and his "A" licence was issued in October, 1935, being endorsed for passenger carrying in the following month. A year later he gained his "B" licence. Pilot Peel was aged 22, and was unmarried. Mr. Peel had been with the company about eighteen months.
There were no passengers on board. The manager of Union Airways said that a ground-man at the aerodrome saw the machine being forced down. He motored along the road and ran across a paddock, reaching the scene four minutes after the crash. On reporting to headquarters all he could say was that both pilots were dead. Evening Post, Volume CXXV, Issue 108, 10 May 1938, Page 12

29 May 1938 - An Air Force aeroplane with five occupants crashed at the Greenhills aerodrome, near Liverpool, Sydney, NSW, yesterday afternoon. Two men are dead, and the three others injured, one having both legs broken. The Royal Australian Air Force authorities are reticent and it is difficult to secure details. The two known to be dead are Flight-Lieutenant M Allsopp, of the Vacuum Oil Company, and Corporal W A Lockwood, 22. The injured are Messrs Raymond Merchant LAWSON, a New Zealander, James Mackey and John Gordon. All are in a critical condition, with broken limbs and severe internal injuries. All the occupants were members of the Citizens' Air Force. The machine was an Avro Anson bombing plane.
Mr Raymond Lawson is a brother of Mr L W Lawson, of 15 Lake Road, Devonport, and Mrs E S Holmes, of Buchanan Street, Devonport. He is 33 years of age, married, and has one son. He was born in New Zealand and was educated at the Te Awamutu Public School and Hamilton High School. After leaving the latter school he joined the firm of Turnbull and Jones. He went to Australia in 1925, and travelled as a radio engineer. He was president of the Tamworth Gliding Club. Two years ago he joined the Australian Air Force, and became a member of the City of Sydney bombing squadron. Another brother, Mr Eric Lawson, while flying at the launching of the liner Queen Mary, had a narrow escape, as his machine went into a tail spin. The latter has now returned to Sydney, where he has taken a prominent part in aviation. Auckland Star, Volume LXIX, Issue 125, 30 May 1938, Page 7. Raymond LAWSON, one of those injured when a bombing plane crashed at Greenhills Aerodrome, near Liverpool died on the 31 May 1938. This makes the third death. James Gordon [sic] and John Mackey [sic] have slightly improved. Evening Post, Volume CXXV, Issue 127, 1 June 1938, Page 11

13 May 1938 - Flight-Lieutenant Alan Charles [also known as Charles Alan] WASHER, of Clifton, employed by the Bristol Aeroplane Company as a test pilot, escaped by parachute when a Royal Air Force five-ton Wellesley Bomber monoplane, on a test flight over the Severn Valley, crashed in a field beside the main Bristol-Gloucester road, at Rudgeway. His companion, Peter Warren, an observer employed by the company, was killed. The bomber nose-dived from a great height and crashed in flames. The pilot landed safely by parachute at Thornbury, two miles away.
Flight-Lieutenant Washer belongs to New Plymouth. After completing his short-service commission with the Royal Air Force ho was sent to Malta as instructor to Naval pilots for two years. On his return to England he was appointed instructor of instructors before he was 25. For the past four years he has been associated with the Bristol Aeroplane Company as second test pilot. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXV, Issue 23051, 31 May 1938, Page 13 - also see 12 June 1940.

15 June 1938 - G A M [George] BAIRD, a pupil pilot at the Air Force flying school at Brough, was drowned when his aeroplane fell into the River Humber, Yorkshire owing to the engine stalling through loss of flying speed. Mr Baird, who was 25 years of age, had only been in England about a month when the accident occurred, having left to join the Royal Air Force in April. The son of Mr and Mrs A M [Alexander McLeod] Baird, of 5 Selwyn Road, Epsom, he was born in 1913 and was educated at the Seddon Memorial Technical College. After leaving school, Mr Baird worked on a farm in the Wairarapa district for about five years while he was studying to gain his flying licence. He was intensely enthusiastic and gained both his pilot's and passenger licence at Palmerston North shortly before being admitted to the Air Force. A keen sportsman, Mr Baird was particularly prominent in tennis and Rugby football. In addition to playing at school he was a member of the Taihape representative football team several years ago. He is survived by his parents, a twin brother and two sisters. A cablegram was received yesterday by Mr. and Mrs. Baird from the Secretary of State for Air, Sir Kingsley Wood, expressing sincere sympathy in their bereavement both on his behalf and on that of the Air Council. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXV, Issue 23066, 17 June 1938, Page 13. The deceased was buried in the Elloughton cemetery, near Brough, with full military honours. The Royal Air Force detachment in support was drawn from the Leaconfield Royal Air Force Station near by. The cortege was formed at the training school at Brough and marched to St. Mary's Church, Elloughton. The coffin was mounted on a Royal Air Force motor trailer, covered with a Union Jack and numerous wreaths from friends, brother officers and local authorities, and one from the High Commissioner. The service was taken by the Rev. A K. Chignell. After the interment a firing, party fired three volleys over the grave, and the "Last Post was sounded. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXV, Issue 23093, 19 July 1938, Page 12

26 June 1938 - Pilot David Lewis DUSTIN died when then plane he was flying from the Scilly Isles crashed when landing in fog at Land's End, Cornwall, England. Four of the six passengers injured. William Henry Dustin, of Wellington, as the twin brother of the deceased. "Dave Dustin was, with his twin brother "Bill," well known and prominent in sport in Wellington; in fact, the brothers had a unique record in the progress they made from the time they were at the Lyall Bay school. They continued their education at Wellington College, and both gained places there in the cricket first eleven. Later they played for the Wellington College Old Boys' senior eleven. Both were prominent, too, in football, "Dave" winning his way to the representatives in 1929, and "Bill" taking honours in representative cricket. Becoming air-minded, "Dave" Dustin joined the Royal Air Force, and served for six years, two of which were in Irak and, except for some six months, the rest of the time in England. He played Rugby for Air Force teams and for United Services. Later he joined an airways' company operating from Egypt, and after some seven months of experience in commercial flying there he returned to New Zealand, having accepted an appointment here, and brought his young wife with him. He was a pilot with Cook Strait Airways, and proved very popular and efficient in that service. It was for family reasons that he decided to return to England last year, and his loss to the service in New Zealand was regretted. Back in England he was attached again to the R.A.F., and for a time was an instructor at Hendon. Then he took a principal part in operating an air service between England and the Scilly Isles, and reports from time to time indicated that he was doing well. The late Flying-Officer Dustin was a son of the late David Ernest DUSTIN, of Wanganui (and formerly of Wellington), whose death occurred a few months ago. He leaves a widow and a young child, and in addition to his mother there are two brothers and a sister. Evening Post, Volume CXXV, Issue 149, 27 June 1938, Page 12

29 June 1938 - Flight-Lieutenant William Forster PHARAZYN [of the 72nd (Fighter) Squadron of the Royal Air Force] was killed while formation flying near Selby, Yorkshire, was 35 years of age. He was the eldest son of Mr Godfrey Norris Pharazyn, the well-known sheep farmer of Waewaepa, Dannevirke. He was the second son of the family to join the R.A.F. and be killed when flying in England, the younger brother of the deceased, Peter Pharazyn, being killed in a crash in. 1932 near Canterbury, Kent, on his sister's wedding day.
Flight-Lieutenant W F Pharazyn was born in Feilding and when fourteen years of age went to Eton College. He did well there and for two years was in the shooting eight and played for his house in practically all games. In 1920 he went to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he captained the University golf team in 1924 and also took second-class honours in the physics tripos. After leaving Cambridge, he came to New Zealand and joined the staff of Johnston and Co., Wellington, but mercantile life did not appeal to him and he returned to England,, where in 1928 he joined up with the R.A.F. with temporary commission. After three years he was invited to sit for an examination for a permanent commission, in which he came out top. He was then sent for a specialised engineering course, also gaining first place, receiving one of two engineering stars given each year. Two years ago he went to the Staff College at Andover, but while waiting to take up this position he was given highly-confidential work in the Air Ministry, specialising in aerial tactics. He then spent a year at the Staff College. Recently, Flight-Lieutenant Pharazyn was appointed to the Hawker fighting squadron stationed at Church Fenton, Yorkshire. A short time ago he won a memorial prize for an Air Force essay dealing with tactics, which was regarded as a brilliant piece of work. The deceased leaves a widow, daughter of Sir Byron and Lady Peters, and a young son and daughter, aged five and three respectively. Evening Post, Volume CXXVI, Issue 1, 1 July 1938, Page 7. July 8. The wife of the New Zealand airman, Flight-Lieutenant W F Pharazyn, who was killed in an air crash in Yorkshire on June 29, has given birth to a daughter. Auckland Star, Volume LXIX, Issue 160, 9 July 1938, Page 9. The funeral of Flight-Lieutenant William Foster Pharazyn, was held at the Roman Catholic Church at Godalming, Surrey, on July 2. The interment was at Hascombe Parish Church, three miles away. The Royal Air Force Central Band and a firing party from the Royal Air Force depot at Uxbridge were in attendance. Squadron-Loader S Wallingford, New Zealand Air Force Liaison Officer, represented the High Commissioner. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXV, Issue 23096, 22 July 1938, Page 8

02 July 1938 - The second person to qualify as a parachute jumper in New Zealand, parachutist George William SELLARD, 28 years was killed on North Beach, Westport when making a descent. Eight days ago at Mangere he made his 200th descent, and he held the Dominion record of over 7000 ft. for a parachute drop, established last November at Mangere... New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXV, Issue 23080, 4 July 1938, Page 10

10 August 1938 - Acting Pilot-Officer Reginald Alexander ROBERTSON, 25, son of Mrs A G Robertson, of Okaiawa [near Hawera], New Zealand, was killed when a Royal Air Force machine in which he was participating in torpedo-dropping exercises, crashed into the Solent. Pilot Oflicer Robertson was about 20 years of age. He received his early training in aviation at New Plymouth and went to England two years ago to join the R.A.F. He was educated at Okaiawa primary school and Hawera Technical High School. He took a keen interest in sport and was a member of Te Ngutu Golf Club and Okaiawa Tennis Club. Evening Post, Volume CXXVI, Issue 6, 11 August 1938, Page 9 and Auckland Star, Volume LXIX, Issue 188, 11 August 1938, Page 11

FORCED LANDING - NEW ZEALANDER IN CRASH - LONDON, 26 January 1939
When flying an R.A.F. aeroplane near Salisbury, Wiltshire last week, Mr M B FAWCETT (Feilding), who arrived in England last June, had to make a forced landing with engine trouble. The aircraft struck a heifer and turned over. Mr Fawcett was taken to hospital, badly shaken and with a cut head. The heifer was killed. Evening Post, Volume CXXVII, Issue 37, 14 February 1939, Page 9

01 February 1939 - Mr and Mrs G Poynton, of 62 Queen's Avenue, Frankton, Hamilton heard that their only son, Acting Pilot Officer John POYNTON, of the Royal Air Force, had been killed in an aeroplane crash that occurred in Palestine. Mr Poynton was 22 years of age. He left New Zealand two years ago to join a firm of aeroplane designers in England and later he joined the Royal Air Force. For some weeks he had been attached to a unit in Egypt and had been piloting single-seater bombers. Mr Poynton was a resident of Otorohanga before going to Frankton. He was a member of the Waikato Society of Model Engineers. Evening Post, Volume CXXVII, Issue 28, 3 February 1939, Page 11 and New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVI, Issue 23293, 11 March 1939, Page 14

28 February 1939 - Two pilots who were injured in the air crash at Mangere were reported by the Auckland Hospital authorities this afternoon. Mr Robert H HESKETH, of 28, Abbott's Road, Remuera, was admitted suffering from injuries to the back and one ankle, and Mr G K LARNEY, of Christchurch, from lacerations and bruises. Auckland Star, Volume LXX, Issue 50, 1 March 1939, Page 8

17 March 1939 - A passenger was killed and the pilot seriously injured when a Miles Magister low-wing monoplane belonging to the Auckland Aero Club crashed into the tussocky marshland about 200 yards from the aerodrome boundary at Great Barrier Island. The machine, which was acquired by the club about a year ago at a cost of £1850, was wrecked. The occupants were:
Killed - Mr William Holman CLARIS, 33, single, a Public Works engineer, engaged in the construction of an aerodrome at Great Barrier. He is believed to have relatives in Wellington.
Injured - Mr E M WALKER, pilot, of Auckland, aged 33. He suffered a compound fracture of the right ankle, a fracture of the upper portion of the right leg, injuries to the face. His condition last night was fairly serious. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVI, Issue 23299, 18 March 1939, Page 14. Memorial to Engineer In honour of the memory of Mr W H Claris, a Public Works Department engineer who was killed in the recent air crash at Great Barrier Island, the aerodrome at Okupu is to be called Claris Aerodrome. Such a request was made by the Great Barrier Island County Council, which has received advice from the Public Works Department that the Minister, the Hon. R Semple, has agreed to this name being given the aerodrome. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVI, Issue 23349, 18 May 1939, Page 10

21 March 1939 - Private advice had been received in Napier from London of the death in an Air Force crash of Mr Hugh Lynn McPHEE, a New Zealander. He has been an aircraftsman attached to the Royal Air Force for the last four years. Mr McPhee, who was 25 years old, was an outstanding all-round athlete. He was a notably good footballer and cricketer, and also won success at athletics and tennis. As an amateur boxer he won many bouts and also received award for the most scientific boxer in his college and other tournaments. Auckland Star, Volume LXX, Issue 67, 21 March 1939, Page 11. News has been received privately in Napier of the death in an air crash somewhere in Britain of Mr. Hugh Lynn McPhee, formerly of Napier, and son of the late Mr and Mrs Dugald McPhee. He left New Zealand four years ago to join the Royal Air Force and, according to letters, he was stationed in Scotland, where it is assumed the fatal crash took place. Mr McPhee, who was to have visited New Zealand in October, was 25 years of age. He was born at Ongaonga, and later lived with his parents at Puketitiri and Napier. He was educated at the Hastings Street School and the Napier Boys' High School, where he excelled at football, cricket, athletics, boxing and tennis. On leaving school he joined the staff of Broad and Abraham, Marton, leaving there to join the Royal Air Force. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVI, Issue 23302, 22 March 1939, Page 15

12 May 1939 - One officer of the Royal New Zealand Air Force was killed and another two died in hospital as a result of a Vickers Vildebeest aeroplane crashing into a tree on the boundary of the Wigram aerodrome. The machine, which was about to land after night flying exercises, fell to the ground and burst into flames. The victims of the accident were:
Acting Pilot-Officer Reginald James McCRORIE; 22, killed instantly. Acting Pilot-Officer McCrorie came from Wanganui and was educated at the Wanganui Collegiate School. He was a son of Lieutenant-Colonel W S McCrorie. He had been at Wigram more than six months. Lieut.-Colonel McCrorie was formerly commanding officer of the Wellington (West Coast) Regiment.
Pilot-Officer William Frederick DAWSON, 20, died from burns. He is from Balclutha.
Leading Aircraftman George Henry WEST, 25, died in hospital, seriously burned. He was from Bluff.
The official account of the accident is that the men were engaged on night flying training. The Vickers Vildebeest, in which they were flying, hit a tree on the south boundary of the aerodrome, as the aeroplane was coming in to land at 8.15 p.m. Evening Post, Volume CXXVII, Issue 110, 12 May 1939, Page 10

02 June 1939 - Pilot-Officer Antonio S DINI (Christchurch) is in hospital suffering from shock, slight concussion, and other minor injuries following the crash of a Walrus type of amphibian into the sea off Littlehampton, Sussex, when one man was killed and another disappeared. At the inquest at Littlehampton on Saturday, on Midshipman Hugh Lawley CHARTERIS, aged 20, who was an observer under training in the machine, it was stated that the pilot would probably never recover his memory of the accident. Evening Post, Volume CXXVIII, Issue 24, 28 July 1939, Page 6

25 June 1939 - A parachuting tragedy occurred at Mangere Aerodrome, Auckland when making a descent from 2000 feet a Hamilton parachutist, Leo Edgar Anzac HAYWARD, aged 24, came down in the Manukau Harbour and was drowned. Speedy rescue efforts resulted in Mr Hayward being brought ashore. Resuscitation was applied immediately and continued for over an hour without avail. The tragedy occurred in the presence of several hundred onlookers. Evening Post, Volume CXXVII, Issue 148, 26 June 1939, Page 7

18 July 1939 - A bomber of the 44th Squadron, a Hampden bomber, which was making a cross-country flight with other machines from Waddington, Lincolnshire, to Tangmere, Sussex, crashed on the boundary of the villages of Irnham and Corby, between Bourne and Grantham, Lincolnshire, killing the four occupants. Included was Flying-Officer David Ian JOBSON of New Zealand. The machine apparently lost its bearings and dived at full speed into the edge of a wood. An explosion took place and the plane took fire. Flying-Officer Jobson came from Hawera, and went direct to England to present himself for enrolment in the Royal Air Force there. Evening Post, Volume CXXVIII, Issue 16, 19 July 1939, Page 11. Flying-Officer D I Jobson, who was killed in an air crash at Corby, England, was the youngest of three sons of Mr and Mrs W Jobson, Hawera. He was educated at Wanganui preparatory and collegiate schools and for some time was on the staff of the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Company at Hawera. He took a prominent part in provincial swimming championships and surf lifesaving. After a course of training under Flying-Officer Ian Keith, he was nominated for the Royal Air Force and about three years ago went to England, earning rapid promotion. [Flying Officer Jobson joined the R.A.F in February 1936, on short service commission. After attending a Flying Training School he was posted to the 44 (B) Squadron at Waddington, near Lincoln.] Evening Post, Volume CXXVIII, Issue 16, 19 July 1939, Page 12

04 September 1939 - The New Zealander Pilot-Officer L H EDWARDS, who was captured on September 4 when his machine was shot down in the Royal Air Force raid on Wilhelmshaven, Germany. His parents, Mr and Mrs C Edwards, of Patea, were advised last week by the Air Ministry that their son was reported as missing while undertaking patrol duties. Pilot- Officer Edwards was stated to be unhurt except for minor burns' to the face. [First NZ RAF Prisoner of War ?] New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVI, Issue 23453, 16 September 1939, Page 10

09 September 1939 - Official advice has been received by Mr and Mrs P. Drummond, from the British Air Ministry, stating that their only son, Pilot-Officer John DRUMMOND who was Hawke's Bay first casualty in the present war, was killed in action on the night of September 9 while carrying out an extensive patrol of the English Channel in bad weather, when visibility was extremely poor because of thick fog. His aeroplane crashed at Cape Griz-Nez, on the coast of France. Three other aeroplanes in the same flight also came down. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVI, Issue 23501, 11 November 1939, Page 13

08 November 1939 - Advice of the death of Pilot-Officer Augustus Harold Jervis RYAN on active service with the Royal Air Force was received today. He was the son of Mr and Mrs T J Ryan, of New Plymouth, and had a prominent athletic career at the New Plymouth High School. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVI, Issue 23501, 11 November 1939, Page 13

19 November 1939 - Pilot Officer Hubert John KELLER, of Maungaturoto, aged 20 and son of Peter and Mary Gertrude D'Oyly Keller is among those missing and believed to have been killed on active service. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVI, Issue 23517, 30 November 1939, Page 10

05 February 1940 - An Air Force officer and two aircraftmen were killed when a Baffin bomber, from the Wigram air station, crashed into the sea off the coast between North Beach and Waimairi, about six miles from Christchurch City. They were:—
Flight-Lieutenant Arthur Darval POULTON, 41, of West Eyreton
Aircraftman (First Class) Douglas Haig BIRBECK, 23, of Barbadoes Street, Christchurch
Air Gunner William James Reynold STRACHAN, 33, of Roxburgh
These men were the bomber's only occupants. An hour after the crash the machine was still afloat, but watchers from the beaches could see no sign of life aboard it.Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 30, 5 February 1940, Page 10

12 March 1940 - Squadron Leader David Malyon ALLAN, 44 years, was killed when he fell from an Air Force Tiger Moth in which he was acting as instructor, at Mangere, Auckland. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVII, Issue 23658, 17 May 1940, Page 10

13 March 1940 - Arthur James SKIDMORE, Royal Air Force pilot, Christchurch, lost his life in an aeroplane crash while on active service in England. A son of Mr and Mrs W H Skidmore, Papanui, Christchurch, Pilot-Officer Skidmore was one of a party of 18 men who left New-Zealand on April 6, 1938, to take up a short service commission with the R.A.F. in England. Educated at Belfast School and at Christchurch College, Pilot-Officer Skidmore, who was 25, had some flying experience in Canterbury before he left New Zealand. It is understood he had been, engaged in night flying. Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 65, 16 March 1940, Page 8

11 May 1940 - When the propeller flew off in mid-air an Air Force Tiger Moth machine crashed into a gully on a farm on the outskirts of New Plymouth. Leading-Aircraftman Dean Frederick BULLEN, aged 23, the sole occupant, had his spine fractured. Last night the hospital reported that his condition was not critical. Bullen is the second son of Mr F R S Bullen, headmaster of the West End School, and the second of the family to enter the Air Force, his brother Richard being stationed in the South Island. He had had 33 to 35 hours' solo flying since coming to New Plymouth from the Weraroa Training School. [1981/37584 Bullen Dean Frederick 7 December 1916] - Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 111, 11 May 1940, Page 10

07 June 1940 - It is learned that Flying Officer "Cobber" Edgar James KAIN crashed and was killed instantly when a wing-tip of his Hurricane fighter touched the ground while he was flying over an aerodrome [at Ιchemines, France]. His death occurred only a few hours after he had been informed that he was being posted to England for special duties as an instructor. He wanted to stay in France, but the authorities judged that his brilliant service had earned him a spell of home duty. The aviation writer of "The Times," paying a tribute to Kain, says: "This tall, big-boned New Zealander was known affectionately to his associates as the "mad devil." It was undoubtedly this streak of recklessness, controlled by cool thinking, which gave him so many victories in such a short time. The name of Kain is permanently inscribed among the great air fighters." Edgar James Kain was born on 27 June 1918 at Hastings, the son of Nellie Maria Keen and her husband, George William Reginald Kain. Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 138, 12 June 1940, Page 8

15 June 1940 - Two shops in the main street of Akaroa were burned when a New Zealand Air Force Oxford 279 bomber crashed on them and burnt into flames. The victims were: -
Leading Aircraftsman John Lindsay McFADGEN of Blackball, West Coast
Leading Aircraftsman Francis Morris McFARLANE of Nelson, married. Auckland Star, Volume LXXI, Issue 141, 15 June 1940, Page 8
Leading Aircraftman F M McFarlane one of the victims of the aeroplane crash at Akaroa, was a former resident of Dunedin. The elder brother, Lawrence, has been in the Royal Air Force in England since 1936, another brother, Donald, is a sergeant in Egypt, and the youngest brother, John, has volunteered for service in the New Zealand Air Force and is waiting to be called up. Leading Aircraftman McFarlane was born at Napier and educated at the Otago Boys' High School. Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 144, 19 June 1940, Page 5

21 June 1940 - An Airspeed Oxford bomber from Christchurch, crashed at the Taieri aerodrome. It immediately burst into flames, and one man lost his life. The two other members of the crew suffered injuries. Details are:
KILLED - Squadron-Leader John Hugh KITSON, 28.
INJURED - Pilot-Officer P R McNAB, navigator, of Reumuera, Auckland, slightly injured. He is married.
Aircraftsman R E KILPATRICK, of Oamaru, severe burns to hands and face. He is single.
The bomber was taking off at the time of the accident. Squadron-Leader Kitson was promoted only yesterday from the rank of Flight-lieutenant. He joined the R.A.F. in 1934, and arrived in New Zealand on loan to the R.N.Z.A.F. in March of this year. He was a married man. His wife and two children live in England. Auckland Star, Volume LXXI, Issue 146, 21 June 1940, Page 3. GEORGE MEDAL - TWO NEW ZEALANDERS HONOURED - RESCUE OF INJURED OFFICER - CRASH AT TAIERI - The George Medal is to be awarded to Leading Aircraftman Dennis Trevelyan HERRICK and Corporal Ernest Alfred STRATTON, both of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, for bravery in extricating an injured officer from the blazing wreckage of an Oxford aircraft which crashed at Taieri Aerodrome, Dunedin. Herrick was since promoted to the rank of Pilot Officer and has been transferred for overseas service. He is the son of Mr. E. J. Herrick, Lindisfarne, Hastings, where he was born 28 years ago. He was educated at Wanganui College, and at Canterbury Agricultural College, Lincoln, and later was engaged in sheep farming. He was accepted for enlistment in the Civil Reserve of Pilots in August, 1939, and later, after war broke out, commenced training as a pilot, R.N.Z.A.F. Sergeant Stratton is the son of Mrs. Mary Stratton, 43 Thomson Street, Palmerston North, and is 34 years of age. For a period he served in the Royal Navy and later became a fire brigadesman with the Palmerston North Fire Board. He applied for enlistment in the Royal New Zealand Air Force shortly after war broke out and was appointed as firemaster with the rank of corporal. Evening Post, Volume CXXXI, Issue 22, 27 January 1941, Page 9

02 July 1940 - Flying Officer Laurence Herbert McFARLANE, who has been reported missing on active service, is the eldest son of Mr and Mrs H O McFarlane, of English Avenue, Mornington, Dunedin. He was educated at the Otago Boys' High School, and took up the study of electrical engineering and wireless on leaving school. He joined the Air Force in 1936. His brother, Leading Aircraftman Francis Morris McFarlane, was one of the victims of the fatal air crash at Akaroa on June 15. Evening Post, Volume CXXX, Issue 10, 11 July 1940, Page 13

03 July 1940 - The Minister of Defence, announced with regret that as the result of a fall from a Vincent aircraft a member of the Royal New Zealand Air Force was killed at Ohakea at 10 a.m. The victim was:
Leading-Aircraftsman David Hanforth HAWKES, aged 24, formerly of Whangarei.
The aircraft was engaged in bombing practice at a height of 3000 ft. There is no information as yet as to the cause or circumstances of the accident, but an official committee of inquiry is to investigate. Aircraftsman Hawkes was undergoing training as an observer. There were two other occupants of the aeroplane, who landed the machine safely. The deceased was the son of Mr and Mrs G A Hawkes, of Onerahi, North Auckland. Before his entry into the Royal Air Force he was on the staff of the Whangarei Harbour Board. Educated at the Whangarei High School, he was well known in cricket and football circles. Auckland Star, Volume LXXI, Issue 157, 4 July 1940, Page 12

22 July 1940 - Four members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force were killed when an aeroplane crashed into a hillside at Ataahua, near Kaituna, 26 miles from Christchurch, in heavy fog.The machine is slated to have been on its way to the Birdling's Flat range for air firing practice. The victims were:—
Pilot Officer William Oscar George KROGH, aged 28, Hastings, staff pilot, Wigram.
Airman Pilot Leading Aircraftman Archibald John HULL, aged 24, Napier.
Airman Pilot Leading Aircraftman Herbert John VON TUNZELMANN, aged 22, Invercargill.
Aircraftman First Class (Flight Mechanic) Albert Bartholomew DUFFELL, aged 25, married, Christchurch.
Pilot Officer Krogh was trained at Wigram Flying Training School, No. 9 course, and on passing out was selected for retention with the Air Force in New Zealand because of his outstanding ability. Since then he had continued to serve at Wigram. Aircraftmen Hull and von Tunzelmann were both on the senior course at the school and would have completed this training at the end of this week. Aircraftman Duffell was serving with an advanced training squadron. Evening Post, Volume CXX, Issue 20, 23 July 1940, Page 9. Leading Aircraftman Archibald John Hull, who was one of the four victims of the air crash near Lake Ellesmere, was the only son of Mr and Mrs H T Hull, Napier and brother of Miss Helena Hull, Wellington. He was educated at the Napier Boys' High School and at Waitaki Boys' High School. After spending two years at Canterbury College, he was for three years employed at the Shell Oil Company's laboratory in Wellington. During this time he attended classes at Victoria College, and last year graduated with the degree of M.Sc. He took a full part in the college sporting activities, and was a prominent oarsman. Immediately after the November examinations last year, he enlisted with the Air Force and began training at Levin in January, later going to Taieri. He was to have "passed out" from Wigram this week. Evening Post, Volume CXXX, Issue 21, 24 July 1940, Page 11

12 June 1940 - A decision to head his aeroplane for open country rather than crash in a residential district cost Flight-Lieutenant Alan Charles [also known as Charles Alan] WASHER, formerly of New Plymouth, his life. When the aircraft got into difficulties, the New Zealander told his crew to jump by parachute. By the time open country was reached it was too late for him to follow. Many tributes have been paid to him at Southampton, where he was well known. A memorial service was held at Almondsbury, South Gloucestershire, England. Flight-Lieutenant Washer, who was 29 years old, joined the Royal Air Force about 10 years ago and served in England and Malta for about four years, retiring with the rank of flight lieutenant. He then joined the Bristol Aeroplane Company, Limited, and for three years was an instructor at the Bristol Flying School, later becoming one of the company's test pilots. The Western Daily Press said: "As an exponent of flying technique, he was a brilliant pilot, and his work had attracted attention among expert fliers in Britain and abroad." New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVII, Issue 23722, 31 July 1940, Page 8 [WASHER does not appear to have a CWGC headstone.]

07 August 1940 - Leading Aircraftman Thomas Edwin DENBEE, R.N.Z.A.F., was killed at Woodbourne Aerodrome, Blenheim, as a result of an accident during night-flying operations. He was a pilot under training, and was the sole occupant of an Oxford twin-engined trainer. Extensive night-flying exercises were being carried out at the time and the weather and- flying conditions are reported to have been excellent. The machine was completely wrecked and the pilot was killed instantly. Leading Aircraftman Denbee took off at 11 p.m. It is the first fatality at Woodbourne. Leading Aircraftman Denbee was a son of Mr T T Denbee, Town Clerk, Masterton, and was born in Masterton 22 years ago. He was educated at the Wairarapa High School and later was employed in the office of Borthwick and Sons, Masterton. He was prominent in sporting activities, representing Wairarapa in provincial Rugby, and was a member of the Wairarapa and Ruahine Aero Club, gaining his A licence in December, 1938. He joined the civil reserve of pilots in 1938, and shortly after the outbreak of war applied for service with the R.N.Z.A.F. In February he was posted to the ground training school at Levin, later going to New Plymouth and Blenheim. Evening Post, Volume CXXX, Issue 34, 8 August 1940, Page 12

13 August 1940 - Sergeant Observer Douglas Oswald REWA, aged 19, died as a result of a crash during a training flight in England. He was the son of Waaka Simon and Frances Alice Lillian Rewa, Mount Eden, Auckland. Sergeant Observer Rewa was an old boy of the Auckland Grammar School. He joined the Royal New Zealand Air Force last December and was trained at Weraroa and Ohakea. He left for England in May. Evening Post, Volume CXXX, Issue 42, 17 August 1940, Page 15 and Auckland Star, Volume LXXI, Issue 195, 17 August 1940, Page 11

21 August 1940 - An acting-pilot under the training of the Royal New Zealand Air Force was killed instantly at Blenheim when the aircraft of which he was the sole occupant crashed into a farm shed at 12.20 p.m. The victim was:
Leading-Aircraftsman Raymond Edward George MASON, aged 22.
His father is Mr J H Mason, Te Maropai, Reid's Line, Feilding. Leading-Aircraftsman Mason was engaged in solo flying practice when the accident occurred. The aircraft, which was a Vincent trainer, burst into flames when it struck the shed, being completely wrecked. An aircraft ambulance was quickly on the scene of the accident, which was about eight miles from the aerodrome. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVII, Issue 23741, 22 August 1940, Page 8

31 August 1940 - An officer of the Royal New Zealand Air Force was drowned and another was seriously injured when a De Havilland Tiger Moth training machine in which they were flying dived from 200 ft into the sea about half a mile off the northern end of Narrow Neck Beach shortly after 10 o'clock on the 31 August. The rescued man owed his life to the prompt action of the master and crew of the port examination vessel, which went to his assistance. The man drowned was
Pilot Officer Robert Michael GOLDSTONE, aged 21, son of Mr J Goldstone, of 21 College Street, Wanganui.
Pilot Officer Boyd Victor LE PINE, aged 24, son of Mrs V Le Pine, 161 Barnard Street, Highland Park, Wellington, suffered severe concussion, shock, and lacerations to the face, knees, and arms. The two officers left the Hobsonville air base at 9.15 in the Tiger Moth, which was equipped for dual control flying. About an hour afterward North Shore residents saw the machine passing overhead towards the Rangitoto Channel at an altitude of about 300 ft. Both Pilot Officer Goldstone and Pilot Officer Le Pine were members of the Instructors' School at Hobsonville. Pilot Officer Goldstone was educated at the Wanganui Marist Brothers' School and the Wanganui Technical College. Before joining the Royal New Zealand Air Force he was an employee of Kempthorne, Prosser, and Company. A member of the Wanganui Aero Club, he received his training under the civil reserve scheme, having about 18 months' experience when war broke out. Then he had four months'training at Blenheim, later going to Ohakea for a short period. He had been in Auckland about three weeks. Evening Post, Volume CXXX, Issue 55, 2 September 1940, Page 9

06 September 1940 - Leading-Aircraftsman George William DE VERE, pupil pilot, aged 23, died as a result of injuries received in an accident at the New Plymouth Air Force training school. Evidence was given at the inquest by Flying-Officer B L Haybittle, that as de Vere's machine was coming to a standstill the other aeroplane approached it at a considerable rate. De Vere's machine was hit in the centre of the fuselage. Just before the collision de Vere opened the throttle fully, but there was insufficient time to avoid a collision. Flying-Officer F J McDonald said de Vere was justified in making a right turn across the ground, which was according to the regulations. Auckland Star, Volume LXXI, Issue 234, 2 October 1940, Page 6

11 September 1940 - A tragic accident occurred at Ohakea aerodrome at 6 p.m resulting in the death of Aircraftman Arthur Lawrence JESSOP, aged 22. His father is Mr A L Jessop, Rongotea. Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 64, 12 September 1940, Page 9

30 September 1940 - An Air Force Airspeed Oxford monoplane disappeared while on a flight from Hobsonville to Ohakea. The search was continued both on land and in the air in the Mount Messenger district. The machine was last seen about 1 p.m. on Monday on the northern Taranaki coast. The pilot was
Flying-Officer Harry Nalder MAJOR, 29, who was accompanied by
Flight-Sergeant Sheldon Benton SMITH, 25 and
Corporal Raymond Bernard SMITH, 22
A Mrs Quinn, who lived near the Okau Tunnel at the mouth of the Mangaonga Valley stated that she saw an aeroplane at about 2 p.m. on Monday circling over her home. It later made off in the direction of Mount Messenger. Mr H Rowe, a farmer who lives at the head of the valley, heard a crash about the same time, and the search then concentrated in the heavily wooded country between the Okau Tunnel and the mountain. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVII, Issue 23779, 5 October 1940, Page 10 and New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23905, 4 March 1941, Page 6 and Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 55, 6 March 1941, Page 8. See also NEW ZEALAND ROLL OF HONOUR. IN MEMORIAM. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVI, Issue 74, 24 September 1943, Page 1

14 November 1940 - An Oxford aircraft and its pilot from the Royal New Zealand Air Force station, Ohakea, were reported missing during a crosscountry training flight on a course from Levin to Palmerston North and Ohakea. The sole occupant of the aircraft was
Pilot Officer Thomas Everton KIRK, 26, son of Mrs M M Kirk, 13 Inkerman Street, Onehunga, Auckland. The aircraft was reported to have been heard in the ranges near Tokomaru at approximately 10.45 o'clock that night. Settlers in the vicinity heard the sound of the engines and later the noise of a crash. Reports indicate that there was mist or cloud on the ranges. An aerial search was commenced at dawn this morning and was being continued by aircraft from the R.N.Z.A.F. station, Ohakea. Auckland Star, Volume LXXI, Issue 272, 15 November 1940, Page 8

05 December 1940 - Sergeant Pilot Jack Burall COURTIS, son of Arthur Henry and Ruth Violet Courtis, of Invercargill, died in an aircraft accident in Angus, Scotland. It was stated that Sergeant Pilot Courtis was flying a plane which crashed on the hills during bad weather. Sergeant Pilot Courtis received his preliminary flying training with the Southland Aero Club, and transferred from the reserve of pilots to the Royal New Zealand Air Force shortly after the outbreak of war. He passed through the Levin and the Taieri training schools and gained his wings at Wigram. Evening Post, Volume CXXX, Issue 140, 10 December 1940, Page 8

11 September 1940 - An Air Force trainee, Leading- Aircraftman Maurice Sydney BEST, was killed through being struck by an aeroplane at the Royal New Zealand Air Force station at New Plymouth. He was the third son of Mr and Mrs A Best, of Portsmouth Road, Bombay [Auckland]. He was aged 27 and was well known in the Franklin district. He was born at Bombay and educated at the primary school there and the Pukekohe Technical High School. Later he worked on his father's farm at Bombay. He took a very active interest in sport. In Rugby football he gained a place in the South Auckland Union's representative team. A brother is serving in Fngland with the Royal Air Force. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVII, Issue 23834, 9 December 1940, Page 9

11 December 1940 - Two airmen pilots under training were killed instantly near Leithfield Beach, Canterbury (about 30 miles north of Christchurch) when a Royal New Zealand Air Force aircraft crashed and caught fire at 10am. The occupants were:
Leading Aircraftman Basil Rawdon Hastings SHARP, 22, next of kin (father), Mr F G Sharp, 87 Lytton Road, Gisborne.
Leading Aircraftman Leslie WRIGHT, 22, next-of-kin (mother), Mrs L Wright, 44 Weka Street, Frankton Junction.
The aircraft, which was piloted by Leading Aircraftman Sharp, with Leading Aircraftman Wright as passenger, was engaged in an instrument-flying triangular cross-country flight from Wigram. It crashed at the junction of the Leithfield Beach Road and the Main North Road. Evening Post, Volume CXXX, Issue 141, 11 December 1940, Page 11

09 December 1940 - Pilot-Officer William Ross WATSON, son of Mrs J Watson, now of Martinborough and formerly of Masterton was killed in Norfolk, England as the result of an air accident. Pilot-Officer Watson, who was 24 years of age, joined the Royal Air Force in England three years ago and had been engaged in instructional duties. Auckland Star, Volume LXXI, Issue 298, 16 December 1940, Page 10

18 December 1940 - Cabled advice has been received by Mr H H A Renai, of Khandallah, of the death of his son, Sergeant-Observer Paul Victor RENAI, of the Royal Air Force, who was killed instantly, together with the rest of the crew, when his plane crashed. Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 12, 15 January 1941, Page 12

24 December 1940 - Pilot-Officer John Warren HAMILL, only son of Mr and Mrs John Edward and Ruth Myrtle Hamill, formerly of Taihape was killed in action while serving with the Royal Air Force in Britain. He was a pilot and usually flew a Spitfire. He lost an eye in a crash some months ago. Pilot-Officer Hamill was educated at the Wanganui Collegiate School, and was engaged in journalism for a short time after leaving school. Later be became manager of a cinema, but was engaged in this occupation for a short time only before going to England in 1937 to join the Royal Air Force. One of his vacations was spent in Scotland where he and his younger sister Elaine stayed with friends. At football and boxing Pilot-Officer Hamill made a name for himself while a member of the Royal Air Force. He was reeognised as a capable pilot. Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 3, 4 January 1941, Page 12

31 December 1940 - Two airmen were killed and six adults and four children in a house had a miraculous escape from death when an Airspeed Oxford aeroplane on a cross-country training flight ploughed through the upper storey of Mr Cecil Mark Aidan KEBBELL's homestead at Ashurst, about 10 miles from Palmerston North. Those killed were:
Sergeant Rex BROOKE-TAYLOR, aged 25, instructor at Ohakea, whose wife lives in Madras Street, Christchurch.
Leading Aircraftman Thomas Arthur Hughes ALEXANDER, aged 26, trainee at Ohakea, son of Mr W A Alexander, of Kohukohu, North Auckland. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVII, Issue 23852, 31 December 1940, Page 6

06 January 1941 - A Royal New Zealand Air Force machine from the Hobsonville Air Base crashed into the harbour a short distance off the mouth of the Whau Creek. The two officers managed to scramble on top of the wreckage and were rescued by a private launch before being transferred to a Tasman Empire Airways tender and sent to the Auckland Hospital. The officers were:
Pilot Officer Peter Southey WORSP, aged 24, Whangarei, who suffered shock and abrasions. His condition is not serious.
Pilot Officer Arthur Clendon LONG, aged 27, Kelburn, Wellington, who suffered injuries to his back and head and concussion. His condition is serious [see 22 Sep 1942]. It was officially stated that the aeroplane, a Tiger Moth training machine, fitted for dual control, was returning to Hobsonville from a short training flight. Both officers have been attending the instructors' course at Hobsonville and had been away from the base for from 40 to 50 minutes. Evening Post, Volume CXXXI, Issue 5, 7 January 1941, Page 8
The death occurred in the Wellington Hospital on the 27 September 1942 after a long illness of Pilot-Officer Arthur C Long, aged 29. Pilot-Officer Long received serious injuries to the head and back when a dual control training plane in which he and another officer had been on a training flight crashed in the Auckland Harbour on 6 January 1941. Both officers were rescued. After three months in the Auckland Hospital Pilot-Officer Long was flown to Wellington, and had been in hospital here ever since. He was a son of the Rev. F C Long, general secretary to the New Zealand Anglican Board of Missions in Wellington, and Mrs Long. New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24391, 29 September 1942, Page 5

09 January 1941 - When flying at a low altitude along the Manawatu River in an easterly direction at 2.15pm, a Vincent biplane from the Blenheim Air Force Station struck high tension power lines across the river about 300 yards west of the Whirokino bridge, near Foxton, tipped up and nose-dived into the river. One of the occupants was drowned, but the other, believed to have been in the rear cockpit, was saved by the prompt action of a carpenter, Mr Maurice Parsons, who was working on a new building on the riverbank nearby. The victims were
Leading Aircraftman Kennard James HAASE, 22, drowned. Next-of-kin, Mrs H Haase, 103 Kowai Road, Nelson.
Leading Aircraftman Cecil William HOLMES, cuts to face, abrasions, and possible internal injuries. Father, Captain A. Holmes, Defence Department, Hawera. Evening Post, Volume CXXXI, Issue 8, 10 January 1941, Page 8

21 January 1941 - Two machines from the Royal New Zealand Air Force Station at Woodbourne were caught by fog and low cloud and crashed into the tops of hills near Seddon. The crews of both machines, four airmen training at Woodbourne, were killed instantly, and both machines were destroyed. The victims of the tragedies were:
Leading Aircraftman Angus Victor MacLeod GILMOUR - Next-of-kin: Dr W Gilmour, 101 Mountain Road, Epsom, Auckland (father).
Leading Aircraftman Guy Wilfrid SUISTED - Next-of-kin: Mr C H Suisted, 46 Hobson Street, Wellington (father).
Leading Aircraftman William Frederick READER - Next-of-kin: Mr W T Reader, 32 Volga Street, Island Bay, Wellington (father).
Leading Aircraftman Rodney Albert LLEWELLYN - Next-of-kin: Mrs J W Llewellyn, Ruawai, North Auckland (mother).
Both the aircraft involved were Vincents, states an official report. They left Woodbourne aerodrome at 8.30 a.m. and 10 a.m. respectively, to undertake a training flight, the first aircraft being piloted by Leading Aircraftman Suisted with Leading Aircraftman Gilmour as navigator, and the second piloted by Leading Aircraftman Reader with Leading Aircraftman Llewellyn as navigator. Weather conditions at Blenheim when the aircraft took off were satisfactory. Later in the morning a report was received that an aircraft had crashed near Seddon in the vicinity of the Redwood Pass road. Evening Post, Volume CXXXI, Issue 18, 22 January 1941, Page 9

31 January 1941 - An airman-pilot under training, the sole occupant of an aircraft engaged in night flying exercises at the R.N.Z.A.F. station at Wigram, was killed at 3.10am when the aircraft crashed two miles from the aerodrome. The victim was:
Leading Aircraftsman Allan Henry McIVER, a son of Mr R J McIver, of Palmenston North. It is believed the pilot overshot the flarepath, and during his recovery flew into the ground. Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 26, 31 January 1941, Page 8

08 February 1941 - An airman-pilot under training was killed and two others were injured when two trainer aircraft collided in the landing approach at the Royal New Zealand Air Force station at Taieri at 7.30 a.m. They were:
Killed - Leading-Aircraftman Desmond Thomas Francis HANRAHAN. His next nextof-kin is his mother, Mrs H Hanrahan, of 128 East Street, Ashburton.
Injured Flying-Officer Leonard Frederick POORE, broken left arm, bruises and shock. He was admitted to the Dunedin Hospital. His next-of-kin is his wife, Mrs E M Poore, of Green Street, Mosgiel.
Leading-Aircraftman Philip Walter Darcy STEWART, slightly injured, bruises and shock. He was admitted to the Station Hospital. His next-of-kin is his father, Mr W T Stewart, 1 Moana Flats, Victoria Avenue, Wanganui.
The aircraft, of which Leading-Aircraftman Hanrahan was the sole occupant, had been engaged in flying exercises and was coming in to land when it collided at approximately 100 ft with the other aircraft, piloted by Flying-Officer Poore. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23885, 8 February 1941, Page 10

11 February 1941 - The following official war casualties were announced to-day:
Sergeant Walter Lionel GOSDEN, R.N.Z.A.F., killed in a flying accident on 04 February 1941. His next-of-kin is his mother, Mrs I Gosden, of Ngaio, Wellington.
Sergeant Ronald Edward ASHBY-PECKHAM, R.N.Z.A.F., transferred from the dangerously ill list to the seriously ill list, on January 31. His next-of-kin is his father, Mr W G ASHBY-PECKHAM, Dargaville. Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 35, 11 February 1941, Page 8

20 February 1941 - One member of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost his life and another was injured when two aircraft of which they were the occupants collided while on training flights near R.N.Z.A.F. station, Harewood. They were:—
Killed - Leading Aircraftman William Gordon STEPHENS. Next-of-kin, Mrs Margaret Stephens (wife), 9 Nursery Road, Linwood, Christchurch; mother, Mrs. A. M. Stephens, Mount Hutt R.D., Rakaia.
Slightly Injured - Leading Aircraftman Walter John WILLIS. Next-of-kin, Mr. Stanley Collard Willis (father), 94 Karaka Road, Thames.
Both were airman pilots under training and were engaged in solo flying practice. The accident occurred at 9.27 am approximately one mile east of Harewood. The two aircraft collided in mid-air, both crashing. Evening Post, Volume CXXXI, Issue 43, 20 February 1941, Page 10

04 March 1941 - A P.H. 82 Tiger Moth aircraft crashed from a height of 50ft. on Muriwai Beach Auckland. The sole occupant, Leading-Aircraftman Warwick Ashling HOUSTON, aged 20, an airman pilot under training at the Royal New Zealand Air Force station at Whenuapai, suffered injuries, including concussion, facial abrasions and a fractured nose. Leading-Aircraftman Clouston, who was brought into Auckland by ambulance, was admitted to the Auckland Hospital at 9..30 last night. He is a son of Mrs K A Clouston, of 10 Ocean View Road, Milford. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23906, 5 March 1941, Page 8

05 March 1941 - An airman pilot under training was killed when two Hawker Hind aircraft from the Royal New Zealand Air Force station at Ohakea engaged in formation flying half-way between Shannon and Levin collided in the air and made forced landings. The victim was:
Leading-Aircraftman Evan Roy ARCHER, son of Mr K Archer, Bank of New Zealand, Te Kuiti. He was the sole occupant of the machine.
The pilot of the other machine was Leading-Aircraftman Gordon Griffiths THOMAS, son of Mrs M K Thomas, Golf Road, Epsom. He was the sole occupant of his machine and was not injured. Leading-Aircraftman Archer was born in Wellington and educated at the Te Kuiti District High School. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23906, 5 March 1941, Page 8

05 March 1941 - Acting-Flying-Officer John Austin STRONG died as the result of an aircraft accident in England was a young New Zealand scientist, who was appointed in October, 1933, as the Travis radiological physicist under the New Zealand branch of the New Zealand Empire Cancer Campaign Society. In 1939 he entered the scientific department of the War Office, later joining the Royal Air Force, where he was engaged in scientific work. He was the son of Mr T B Strong, of Lower Hutt, formerly Director of Education. Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 60, 12 March 1941, Page 11

06 March 1941 - After losing a wing while flying over Otahuhu about 4pm, a Tiger Moth elementary trainer aeroplane from the Royal New Zealand Air Force station at Whenuapai crashed in an open space between two houses near the Otahuhu railway workshops and was burned. The pilot, who was flying solo, was killed. The victim was:
Leading Aircraftman Frank Robert TRAYNOR, aged 19, an airman pilot under training. He was a son of Mr F J Traynor, of Birdwood Avenue, Papatoetoe. Born in India, Leading-Aircraftman Traynor was educated at Wangnnui Collegiate School and Cornwall Park primary school. He enlisted in the Air Force in July last year, and was posted to Levin on December 1. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23908, 7 March 1941, Page 6

10 March 1941 -According to advice received at Air Headquarters this morning, another New Zealander serving with the Royal Air Force has been decorated for gallantry. He is Pilot Officer John Tregonwell DAVISON, of Christchurch, who has been awarded the George Medal. This is the third George Medal to be awarded to a New Zealander, and the first to be awarded for gallantry overseas. The previous awards were to Pilot Officer D T Herrick and Sergeant E A Stratton for their gallantry at the time of an aircraft accident at Taieri. Pilot Officer Davison was born at Ashburton 27 years ago. His next-of-kin is his mother, Mrs N A Davison, of Wairarapa Terrace, Christchurch. Pilot Officer Davison was the pilot of an aircraft which took part in a bombing attack on two heavily-armed merchant vessels. During the action he was wounded in the foot and thigh, but succeeded in flying his aircraft back to its base. Owing to severe damage sustained by the hydraulic gear, it was necessary to make a crash landing. The pilot did not know that a bomb remained on the rack, and it exploded when the plane landed, severely wounding the rear gunner, and setting fire to the aircraft. Pilot Officer Davison and his observer jumped clear, but they then discovered that the rear gunner was still in the aircraft. Regardless of the fire and the likelihood that the petrol tanks might explode, they succeeded in extricating the wounded gunner and dragging him to safety. By their courage and gallantry, the pilot and the observer undoubtedly saved the life of the gunner. Educated at the Christehurch Boys' High School, Pilot Officer Davison was selected for a ehort service commission just before the outbreak of war, and after training at Taieri and Wigram, left New Zealand in the middle of last year. Auckland Star , 10 March 1941, Page 8

13 March 1941 - Flying-Officer William Henry HODGSON, D.F.C., son of Mr and Mrs H Hodgson, Macandrew Road, South Dunedin was killed. Flying-Officer Hodgson had a distinguished record with the Air Force. While on service in Flanders he attracted much attention by his defiance of the demons of bad luck by painting their symbols on his machine. In Belgium he was on patrol with two other fighters when they were all attacked by 50 enemy machines. He was shot down in flames behind the German lines, but managed to obtain civilian clothes and after hiding for eight days joined a refugee column. At the end of 12 days Flying-Officer Hodgson reached the coast and returned to his station. With his squadron he reached Britain, and was kept constantly engaged in helping to beat off the attacking Germans. When official confirmation of the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross to Flying-Officer Hodgson was received at the end of December, it was disclosed that he was the previously unnamed hero of a very gallant episode. In charge of a Hurricane that had caught fire, he refrained from baling out of his blazing machine because he realised that it would crash in a thickly populated London suburb. He stuck to his machine and by skilful manoeuvring managed to keep the flames away from the fuselage until he had landed it in open country. It was thought probable that it was for this act that ho was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. Subsequently he had been taking part in engagements in which his squadron of 12 had been called on to break up enemy formations of as many as 300 raiders. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23916, 17 March 1941, Page 6

13 March 1941 - Flight-Lieutenant Hugh Frank LONG, D.F.C., was reported missing on air operations on March 13. Son of Mr and Mrs W H Long of Masterton, Flight-Lieuteiiant Long left New Zealand in 1939 and joined the Royal Air Force before the outbreak of hostilities. Since the war began he has taken part in many major raids carried out by the Royal Air Force, including flights over Germany, Italy, Poland, Czecho-Slovakia and Norway. He and Pilot-Officer K N Gray were the first New Zealanders to be decorated for gallantry, their feat being the bringing home of an aeroplane with a badly damaged wing after a raid on Germany. After almost 12 months service with the Bomber Command he was posted to instructional training, and rejoined the Bomber Command at the beginning of this month. He was married in October, 1940, to Miss Margaret Rainey, daughter of Dr and Mrs Rainey, Suffolk. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23916, 17 March 1941, Page 6

24 March 1941 - The three occupants of an Airspeed Oxford machine attached to the Royal New Zealand Air Force station at Wigram received injuries when the plane crashed in the old Waimakariri riverbed near Yaldhurst about 11.30am. Two of the men were only slightly injured and, after receiving treatment at Christchurch Hospital for cuts and abrasions to the face, were sent back to the Wigram station hospital. The third was more seriously hurt and is a patient in Christchurch Hospital, where his condition is reported to be satisfactory. The occupants of the machine were:
Leading Aircraftman William Papillion KEMP, aged 26, injuries to upper parts of body. Father, Mr A J W Kemp, Totara, Opotiki.
Pilot Officer Montague James ROWLAND, aged 20, slightly injured. Father, Mr M F Rowland, Miramar, Wellington.
Leading Aircraftman Brian Trevor SHANNON, aged 28, slightly injured. Next-of-kin, sister, Miss E L D Shannon, Cunningham's, Rural Delivery, Oroua. The aeroplane, which was piloted by Pilot Officer Rowland, was very badly damaged. Evening Post, Volume CXXXI, Issue 70, 24 March 1941, Page 6

28 March 1941 - One of two Royal New Zealand Air Force machines flying over a mechanised territorial unit at Reweti, near Helensville, crashed into a paddock about 200 yards from the main north road and the pilot was killed. The aeroplane, a Tiger Moth from the Whenuapai Air Base, caught fire immediately after it struck the ground and was destroyed. The victim was:
Leading-Aircraftman Edwin Chaytor MOORE, single, aged 23, whose mother is Mrs M A MOORE, of 119 Mount Eden Road, Auckland. Leading-Aircraftman Moore was educated at the Grafton School and the Auckland Grammar School, where he played both cricket and Rugby football. He played football for the Grafton club in various grades and was in a senior team in the 1939 season. He was also a prominent member of the Auckland Rowing Club. He left Auckland and went to Whakatane, and joined the Air Force in December of last year. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23927, 29 March 1941, Page 8

02 April 1941 - Pilot-Officer Vernon Wellington RAYMOND and Aircraftman James Edward MURPHY, both of Nelson, were killed when a Royal New Zealand Air Force aeroplane crashed in the Herangi Valley, Pelorus. Corporal Eric WHITLEY, of Auckland, suffered from head injuries and a fractured thigh. Corporal John George WATT, of Dunedin, suffered concussion and abrasions. His condition was satisfactory. A message carried by the aeroplane which returned from Nelson after the crash was dropped at Mr G ACTON's residence and contained an appeal for a local rescue party, which was quickly organised. The party included the Rai Valley district nurse, Mrs L G THOMPSON, who reached the sccne of tho accident over particularly rough country and rendered first aid. Mrs Thompson put Corporal Whitley's broken leg in splints and made it possible for the men to lift him from tho wrecked machine and carry him up a very steep bank to a bridle track, along which he was carried a mile to Mr Acton's house. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23932, 4 April 1941, Page 6 and New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23954, 2 May 1941, Page 8

06 April 1941 - An instructor and a pupil were killed when two Royal Australian Air Force Tiger Moth training aircraft collided in mid-air yesterday over The Lakes golf course [Sydney, N.S.W] during instrument flying practice. Victims who were in the same aeroplane were Flight-Sergeant Jack Holt, aged 24, married, formerly of Victoria, and Leading-Aircraftman Thomas Elliott Mays Hodge, aged 25, single, formerly of England. Occupants of the other aircraft were Pilot-Officer John Robert CHERRY, aged 26, married, formerly of New Zealand who suffered lacerations to the forebead, and John Henry Stephen Pettett, aged 23, married, of Sydney, who was uninjured. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23934, 7 April 1941, Page 6

09 April 1941 - A Royal New Zealand Air Force plane crashed coming in to land at Tahunanui, Nelson with three deaths. The crew were:
Corporal Ernest Ivan JOHNSON, 25, Corporal Johnson was born at Wanganui in 1916 and was educated at Feilding College. At the time of his enlistment at the outbreak of war he was employed by a commercial firm in Wellington. His father is Mr E Johnson, Greatford, Rangitikei,
Flight-Lieutenant Lionel Mountjoy SQUIRE, 33, Flight-Lieutenant Squire was wellknown in Auckland and Hamilton, being a keen club pilot before he joined the Royal New Zealand Air Force. Educated in Japan, he came to New Zealand about 1927, and opened a garage business at Hamilton. He was one of the original pupils of the Auckland Aero Club, being trained by Major G A C Cowper in 1929. and he later served with the old No. 1 (Army Cooperation) Squadron of the Territorial Air Force. Flight-Lieutenant Squire, who took a prominent part in Auckland Aero Club flying, was attached to Air Headquarters, Wellington, at the outbreak of war. He was later transferred to the No. 1 (General Reconnaissance) Squadron at Whenuapai, and, went to the No. 2 Squadron at Nelson only about two months ago. His wife is Mrs D C Squire, of Stevenson Street, Blenheim.
Aircraftsman Lindo James THOMSON, 20. His mother is Mrs C F Thomson, of MacMaster Street, Invercargill. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23937, 10 April 1941, Page 8

09 April 1941 - Leading-Aircraftsman R L W ORCHARD, 21, of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, was badly bruised and cut on the upper part of his body when the aircraft in which he was flying crashed near Caughnawaga, Indian reservation, 20 miles from Montreal, killing the pilot, Flight-Sergeant John Harris, 28, of Sarnia, Ontario. The accident was the first to a Royal Canadian Air Force plane in the Montreal district. The cause of the crash has not been announced by the Air Force authorities. Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 108, 9 May 1941, Page 6

16 April 1941 - With a record of four German aeroplanes shot down during his 12 months service with the Royal Air Force in England, Sergeant-Gunner Noel OWENS, of Wellington Street, Hamilton, has been invalided home. Sergeant Owens crashed during an encounter with enemy machines, suffering a broken leg and arm and injuries to the lip which required the insertion of 22 stitches. Arriving in England shortly after the evacuation from Dunkirk, Sergeant Owens was posted to a squadron of Deliants, with which he carried out all his operations. All his flights were made with a Canadian pilot, find the two airmen always used one of two similar machines. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23941, 16 April 1941, Page 8

19 April 1941 - One officer lost his life and another escaped with minor injuries when a Tiger Moth aeroplane from the Royal New Zealand Air Force base at Hobsonville crashed into Rangitoto Channel near Castor Bay. The survivor was brought ashore by a party of men of the Royal New Zealand Artillery who saw the crash and swam nearly half a mile in all to the airmen's assistance. The victims were:
Killed - Pilot Officer Bertrand William BUTLER, aged 25, single, son of Mr J P Butler, Invercargill. A brother is Brother Patrick, of the, Sacred Heart College, Auckland. Pilot Officer Butler was born in Invercargill and educated at the Marist Brothers' School there and at Sacred Heart College, Auckland. He joined the Air Force last year and was trained in Levin, Dunedin, and Blenheim, being transferred to Hobsonville less than a fortnight ago.
Injured - Pilot Officer Maurice Harry HOY, aged 21, single, son of Mr H Hoy, 35 Grafton Road, Roseneath, Wellington. He received shock and abrasions, and, after being attended by a doctor, was admitted to hospital. He has, a brother serving with the Air Force at Whenuapai. Both had recently been transferred to Hobsonville, where they were to begin the instructors' course, on Monday. Evening Post, Volume CXXXI, Issue 92, 19 April 1941, Page 7

27 April 1941 - Pilot-Officer Richard Hope CRUSH, of the Royal Air Force, who has been reported missing on air operations, was educated at the New Plymouth Boys' High School. He decided to take up sheep fanning and was later on the Dome station, Whatatutu, Gisborne. He took an opportunity to enter the Royal Air Force when applications for short-term commissions in this branch of the service were invited shortly before the outbreak of war, and arrived in England a week before hostilities commenced. Pilot-Officer Crash was married at Cannock, Staffordshire, on February 20, his bride being Miss Kathleen Fletcher, a member of an Aberdeen family. His parents, Mr and Mrs E H Crush, and a sister, Mrs T A Klipsch, reside at Patumahoe. There is also an older brother. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23962, 12 May 1941, Page 6

30 April 1941 - Severe damage was caused to an Airspeed Oxford training aircraft when it crashed at Rongotai, Wellington, but the pilot, Leading-Aircraftman J J FOX, who was the only occupant, was not injured. The pilot was on a routine flight from Ohakea to Blenheim, when he was compelled to land at Rongotai because the weather made it unsafe to cross to the South Island. In doing so he overshot the aerodrome. He crashed through the boundary fence and the machine overturned. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23952, 30 April 1941, Page 10

04 May 1941 - Sergeant-Pilot Roderick Barker TAYLOR, of Auckland, was missing and believed killed in a flying accident in Scotland on May 4. The message stated that the aircraft crashed in the Solway Firth. Sergeant-Pilot Taylor was the second son of Mrs E Taylor, of 10 Halifax Avenue, Epsom, and the late Mr Albert Taylor. He was born in Auckland 22 years ago and attended the Auckland Grammar School. He completed his apprenticeship as a fitter turner at the Otahuhu railway workshops early last year and joined the Royal New Zealand Air Force in March. He received his training at Levin, New Plymouth and Woodburn and qualified as a pilot, leaving for England last October.
Other Air Force and Naval Casualties were:
CONGREVE, Robert Lance (Leading- Aircraftman)— Killed in enemy air raid. - Mrs J K Congreve, Wellington (mother). JONES, Bernard Stanley Maurice (Flying-Officer) Killed in action - Mrs J C Jones, Wanganui(mother). MISKELL, Augustus Michael (Able-Seaman) - Died of injury sustained in air raid. Mr. R. A. Miskel1, 33 Matai Road, Green Lane, Auckland (father). Born at Auckland 22 years ago Able-Seaman Miskell was educated at the Marist Brothers School, and was later employed in a motor trading firm. He was a member of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, and left New Zealand in January. 1940 as a gunner on a merchant ship. He served on several merchant vessels belore he was transferred to the Royal Navy early this year. While in Auckland he was keenly interested in cycling. BRODIE, Andrew Moore (Sgt.) - Previously reported missing; now re- classified missing, believed killed in action - Mrs M Brodie, Gisborne (mother). GREAGER, Cristen Stewart (Sgt.) - Previously reported missing; now reported by International Red Cross prisoner of war - Mr P C Greager, Wanganui (father). HANNAH, Anthony James (Sgt.).— Missing on air operations - Mr F H Johnson, Wellington (uncle). JONES, David Leslie. (Sgt.) — Previously reported missing; now reported by Red Cross prisoner of war - Mr F D Jones, Sockburn (father). SUTHERLAND, Andrew George (Sgt.) - Previously reported missing; now reported prisoner of war - Mrs D Sutherland, Hamilton (mother). DUNLEY, Leonard Stewart (Pilot- Officer) - Previously missing; now prisoner of war - Mrs A J Janson, Wellington (mother). SPENCE, Douglas James (Pilot Officer). — Missing on air operations - Mr A W Spence, Christchurch (father). New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23957, 6 May 1941, Page 6

05 May 1941 - Sergeant-Pilot Basil Alexander WALKER, son of Mrs K Walker, of Napier, died in Egypt. Born at Christchurch in 1919, Sergeant-Pilot Walker was educated at the Napier Boys' High School and began his training before the war with the Hawke's Bay Aero Club. On the outbreak of war he enlisted with the Royal New Zealand Air Force, finishing his training at Blenheim. He left New Zealand in October, 1940, and was posted to a squadron in Scotland. He was transferred recently to Egypt. His only brother is at present serving with New Zealand forces in the Middle East. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23962, 12 May 1941, Page 6

12 May 1941 - The following Royal New Zealand Air Force casualties are announced: HEWITT, Leonard Rodney (Pilot-Officer), cynovitis of the right knee as a result of an aircraft accident - Mrs F O Hewitt, Christchurch (mother). EVISON, Ivor Wilders Port (Sgt.), injured in a flying accident; superficial burns to the face and hands - Mrs O Evison, Hastings (mother). TONG, Douglas William (Sgt.), injured in a flying accident; superficial burns to the face and hands - Mrs D R Tong, Auckland (mother).New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 23962, 12 May 1941, Page 6

07 May 1941 - Sergeant-Pilot David Leo NOLA, eldest son of Mr and Mrs I J Nola, of Tatuanui, Morrinsville, who is reported missing, believed killed was involved in a crash into a river while engaged in air operations on May 7. Sergeant-Pilot Nola, who was 26 years of age was born at Tatuanui and received his early education at the Tatuanui school and the Marist Brothers' school, Hamilton. He later spent four years at Sacred Heart College Auckland, and continued his higher education at Auckland University College and Victoria College Wellington. He took his. B.Com degree at Auckland in 1938, and subsequently joined the staff of the Public Trust at Te Aroha, later being transferred to Auckland. A transfer to the audit department at Wellington followed. In October. 1939 Sergeant-Pilot Nola, who was at that time a member of the Civil Air Reserve, commenced training in the Royal New Zealand Air Force and he passed out of Wigram in May 1940. Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 112, 14 May 1941, Page 9

15 May 1941 - A collision occurred about 3 p.m. between two aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force station at Blenheim while practising formation flying. The collision occurred a little distance out to sea between White Bluff and the Awatere River mouth, north-west of Cape Campbell. One aeroplane, piloted by Leading-Aircraftsman Alec HAIGH, son of Mr A Haigh, of Greytown, fell into the sea and no trace could be found of the pilot, who must be presumed dead. Floating wreckage was found shortly afterward by a Royal New Zealand Air Force launch which happened to be proceeding through Cook Strait. The other machine, piloted by Leading-Aircraftsman John Joseph FOX, whose wife is Mrs P Fox of Wellington, made a forced landing on the beach. The pilot was admitted to the Wairau Hospital suffering from slight injuries and abrasions. His condition was not serious. Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 114, 16 May 1941, Page 5

29 May 1941 - A Royal New Zealand Air Force aircraft and its occupant, L.A.C. Selwyn Allan SINCLAIR, were reported missing by Air Headquarters. L.A.C. Sinclair was on a crosscountry flight from Blenheim to Stephens Island, and Otaki, and back to Blenheim. He was due back at Blenheim at 11.15 a.m. yesterday, but failed to arrive. A number of aircraft went out to search, and returned at dusk without result. [Later declared deceased] Evening Post, Volume CXXXI, Issue 126, 30 May 1941, Page 9

21 June 1941 - Leading Aircraftman Albert MAHER, 23 years, was killed in an aircraft accident on the boundary of Wigram Aerodrome at 10.40 am. He was a son of Mr M Maher, 34 France Street, North East Valley, Dunedin. Evening Post, Volume CXXXI, Issue 145, 21 June 1941, Page 9

21 July 1941 - During a training flight from Whenuapai Air Base an aeroplane crashed on the beach at Piha. The occupants, Pilot Officer John Desmond BEW and Leading Aircraftman D GALE, received very slight injuries. The aeroplane was damaged fairly extensively. Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 18, 21 July 1941, Page 5

29 July 1941 - An airman pilot under training was killed instantly near Blenheim when he attempted to leave the trainer aircraft, of which he was the sole occupant, by parachute. He was:
Leading-Aircraftman Morris Desmond JURGENS, 22 years, son of Mr H W P Jurgens, 46 Crofton Road, Marton.
Leading-Aircraftman Jurgens took off on a flight from the Royal New Zealand Air Force station at Woodbourne to carry out training exercises, and in the course of the flight he apparently attempted to leave the aircraft by parachute. The accident occurred near Omaka River, approximately six miles west of Woodbourne. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 24030, 30 July 1941, Page 6

30 July 1941 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force at Whenuapai were killed instantly near Riverhead when the aircraft of which they were the occupants crashed. They were:
Pilot Officer Athol FOSTER — Mrs H P R Foster, 5 Westbourne Road, Remuera, Auckland (mother).
Leading Aircraftsman Keith Millen McCULLOCH - Mrs D E McCulloch, Mount Wellington Highway, Otahuhu, Auckland (mother). The aircraft, which was of the trainer type, was engaged in an instructional flight. The occupants were wearing parachutes but did not use them. The aircraft was completely wrecked but did not catch fire. Pilot-Officer Foster was appointed a flying instructor at Whenuapai in 1940. A single man, he was born in 1916 and was educated at King's College. Previous to joining the Air Force he worked for some time on the literary staff of the New Zealand Herald, both in Auckland and in Hamilton. Leading Aircraftsman McCulloch, who was 18 years of age, arrived at Whenuapai on Sunday last on transfer from Levin Training School. He was unmarried. Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 178, 30 July 1941, Page 8

19 August 1941 - While engaged in night-flying training at Woodbourne an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force crashed. The sole occupant, Leading Aircraftman Arthur Ormond HATHAWAY, was killed. The cause of the accident is obscure. A court of inquiry, will be held. Leading Aircraftman Hathaway was born in Masterton in 1913. His next of-kin is his father, Mr A D Hathaway, of Martinborough. Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 44, 20 August 1941, Page 8

28 August 1941 - Two airmen being trained at the Royal New Zealand Air Force station at Wigram lost their lives in a flying accident, when an Airspeed Oxford aeroplane crashed at Lake Ellesmore. They were:
Leading Aircraftman Ronald James BROWN, aged 26, of Wellington.
Leading Aircraftman Norman Joseph Graham MARSHALL, aged 21, of Springston, Canterbury. The aeroplane crashed at 2.40 p.m. while comming in to land. The pilot, Leading Aircraftman Brown, was seriously injured and died after being taken to the Christchurch Public Hospital. Leading Aircraftman Brown's nextof-kin is Mrs C M Gilmour, of Wellington. The next-of-kin of Leading Aircraftman Marshall is his father, Mr J W Marshall, of Springston. New Zealand Herald, Volume 78, Issue 24056, 29 August 1941, Page 6

05 September 1941 - An airman pilot in training, Leading-Aircraftman Arthur Louis SKINNER, 26, was killed at Paekakariki when an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force flew into a target towing wire and spun into the sea during training. Leading-Aircraftman Skinner was born at Dunedin in 1914 and was educated at the Woodville District High School and St. Patrick's College, Silverstream. His next-of-kin is his wife, Mrs Mary Skinner, of Grant Road, Dannevirke. New Zealand Herald, Volume 78, Issue 24062, 5 September 1941, Page 6

11 September 1941 - An airman pilot under training, Leading Aircraftman Bryan Walter [Brian Walter] LAMBOURNE, 19 years, was killed at Kaiapoi when an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force crashed during dual training instruction. The other occupant of the machine, Pilot Officer Kenneth Sinclair BLAIR, was not injured. Leading Aircraftman Lambourne's next-of-kin is Mrs M Lambourne (mother), Mount Albert, Auckland. Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 63, 11 September 1941, Page 11. Leading-Aircraftman Lambourne was the only son of Mrs M Lambourne and the late Mr Lambourne of 4 Oakfield Avenue, Mount Albert, and was within a month of his l9th birthday. He received his education at the Mount Albert Grammar School. After leaving school he joined the New Zealand Shipping Company as a junior clerk. Leading Aircraftman Lambourne took a great interest in sport. He was a member of the rowing crew at the Grammar School. So keen was he to learn to fly that he paid for several hours' training at Rotorua before being accepted for the Royal New Zealand Air Force. He had six weeks training at Levin, and had been only three weeks at Harewood. He had several hours solo flying to his credit. New Zealand Herald, Volume 78, Issue 24068, 12 September 1941, Page 6

12 September 1941 - A wireless operator was killed when he fell from an aircraft during bumpy weather near Havelock. He was:
Aircraftman George Herbert William TAYLOR. Aircraftman Taylor was born at Temuka in 1921 and was a son of Mr George Taylor, of Temuka. New Zealand Herald, Volume 78, Issue 24068, 12 September 1941, Page 6

12 October 1941 - An instructor was killed and a pupil slightly injured when a training aeroplane crashed near Stratford at about 3.45 p.m. The instructor was:
Flying Officer Jack Rua COATH, 31 years, whose wife is Mrs F S Coath, 77 Wallace Place, New Plymouth.
Leading Aircraftman Gordon Farquhar FORBES, son of Mr Alec Forbes, Manawahe, Matata, was taken to Stratford Hospital. Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 90, 13 October 1941, Page 6

12 October 1941 - Leading Aircraftman Ronald Thomas BRANSGROVE, aged 22, received, fatal injuries at Kawaroa Park, New Plymouth, when a swing on which he was riding broke, and he fell head-first on the concrete, fracturing the base of his skull. The accident occurred at 3.45 p.m., and without regaining consciousness he died in the New Plymouth Hospital at 6.30. He was in training as a pilot at No. 2 Elementary Flying Training School. His father is Mr T H Bransgrove, 211 Devon Street, New Plymouth. Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 90, 13 October 1941, Page 9

15 October 1941 - Two members of the R.N.Z.A.F., both from Auckland, were killed when their aircraft on night training crashed near Waitara at 9.45pm. They were:—
Flight Lieutenant Harold Cuthbert WILES, aged 32, married, eldest son of Mr H O Wiles, Lucerne Road, Auckland.
Leading Aircraftman Norman William WILSON, aged 25, single, son of Mr. W. Wilson, Kiwi Road, Devonport. Flight Lieutenant Wiles was an old boy of Auckland Grammar School and was a keen club flyer and a member of the Territorial Air Force before the war. He was stationed at Ohakea till recently. Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 93, 16 October 1941, Page 10 and New Zealand Herald, Volume 78, Issue 24099, 18 October 1941, Page 12

22 October 1941 - As the result of an aircraft accident during training at Blenheim, two airmen lost their lives. Their names are:—
SMITH, Barry Alfred, Leading Aircraftman. Mr A V Smith, Konini Road, Hataitai; Wellington (f.).
HOGG, Wylie Macdonald, Leading Aircraftman. Miss Mary A Hogg; Auckland Hospital, Auckland (s.) Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 99, 23 October 1941, Page 7

28 and 29 October 1941 - Three members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force had remarkable escapes from injury when two training aeroplanes crashed on Mount Grey, North Canterbury, one about 11 o'clock on the 28 October and the other soon after 9 a.m. on the 29 October. The first aeroplane, which crashed into the hillside in fog, was flown by Leading Aircraftman Arthur Frederick TUCKER, and the second, which came down in the same vicinity, was piloted by Pilot Officer Henry Arthur Saye TELFORD with Leading Aircraftman George WILSON as pupil. Both machines were fairly badly damaged and the nature of the country in which they crashed will make salvage work difficult. Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 105, 30 October 1941, Page 7

03 November 1941 - A member of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, Pilot Officer Darcy Bertram CHRISTOPHER, was injured when an aircraft of the R.N.Z.A.F. crashed into the sea off St. Clair, Dunedin, during exercises. The pilot was rescued and admitted to Dunedin Hospital with a lacerated face and bruises. The machine sank. The pilot was rescued by a boat which put off from the shore immediately the accident occurred. Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 108, 3 November 1941, Page 8

20 November 1941 - Leading-Aircraftman Felix Patrick ULENBERG, 26 years, who was flying solo during night flying training, was killed when his machine crashed. He was based at the R.N.Z.A.F. station at Blenheim. Leading Aircraftman Ulenbeig was born at Stratford in 1915, and educated at the New Plymouth Boys' High School, and his next-of kin was Mrs A T Ulenberg, of New Plymouth.
In another accident Pilot-Officer Clive Dudley Alfred HIGHET, whose next-of-kin is his father, Mr G C Highet, of Wellington, was severely injured. The other occupant of the machine, Leading Aircraftman Thomas Leslie COWIN, was not injured. This accident occurred during a landing following night flying training at the R.N.Z.A.F. station at Blenheim. Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 275, 20 November 1941, Page 9

20 November 1941 - An aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force crashed into the bush behind Waikanae during cross-country training, but the sole occupant escaped without injury. Two airmen of the Royal New Zealand Air Force were reported overdue on a cross-country flight from the R.N.Z.A.F. Station, Ohakea. They were occupants of an aircraft engaged in a flight from Ohakea to Opunake and return. The airmen are Leading Aircraftman Charles William BAKER (next-of-kin, father, Mr W P Baker, Box 1, Russell)and Leading Aircraftman Winston Stanley CANNELL (next-of-kin, father, Mr Percy Cannell, Peria, R.D., Matamata).Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 124, 21 November 1941, Page 6

12 December 1941 - Sgt Vincent Herbert GRIFFITHS, 29, from Parnell, Auckland and Sgt Jack Edward WALL, 19, from Harihari, South Westland were killed when on a training flight. They were members of the 14 OTU based at RAF Cottesmore, Rutland, England. Both are buried at the Cottesmore (St. Nicholas) Churchyard Extension. RSA Review - Spring 2014 p12.

15 December 1941 - An aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force was reported missing while engaged in operational exercises from Nelson. The occupants of the machine were:
Pilot-Officer Alexander John MACFARLANE, 26 years, (mother Mrs W Macfarlane, 97 Nile Street, Nelson)
Pilot-Officer Louis George VOLZKE, 27 years, (mother Mrs M M Volzke, C/o Mrs W Arthur, Ngaere, Taranaki)
Aircraftman Philip David [Phillip David] HARRISON, 20 years, (father Mr E Harrison, 87 Victoria Street, Lower Hutt)
Aircraftman Keith Robertson JACK, 20 years, (mother Mrs W R Jack, Mako Mako, R.D, Levin). The plane was found on the 23 December 1941 near Cape Farewell. Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 151, 23 December 1941, Page 7

17 December 1941 - An Air Force aircraft, returning from a training flight to Wigram station crashed into a hillside at Motukarara, south of Christchurch. It was believed that the pilot, who was flying in heavy rain and low cloud, lost his bearings. The crew were:
Leading Aircraftman Ronald Stephen BROOKER, 26 - Mr S C Brooker, 16 Tererika Street, Rotorua (father)
Leading Aircraftman Brian Patrick FITZGERALD, 19 - Mrs Nora Eileen Fitzgerald, 121 Elizabeth Street, Riccarton (mother)
Leading Aircraftman William Ian LINDSAY, 29 - Mrs Jessie Lindsay, 112 Hutt Road, Petone, Wellington (mother)
Pilot Officer Allan Leslie [Alan Leslie] MARSHALL, 21 - Mrs Edna Sophie Marshall, 37 Marama Terrace, Birkenhead, Auckland (mother). Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 146, 17 December 1941, Page 8

17 December 1941 - At 7.50am an Air Force plane crashed at Nomona, nine miles south of Taieri. The sole occupant — an airman training — was seriously injured and was admitted to the Dunedin Public Hospital. The cause of the accident is obscure. The occupant of the plane was Leading Aircraftman Lionel Oscar EDWARDS, whose father is Mr L E B Edwards, 45 Weka Street, Fendalton, Christchurch. Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 146, 17 December 1941, Page 8

20 December 1941 - A Royal New Zealand Air Force aircraft on a practice flight crashed at Yaldhurst, in the vicinity of Christchurch, and an airman pilot under training was killed. The airman pilot, who was the sole occupant, was: Leading-Aircraftman Clifford Henry John MILLER [MILLAR] 21 years, — Next-of-kin, Mr P T Millar, 31 Matlock Street, Woolston, Christchurch (father). New Zealand Herald, Volume 78, Issue 24153, 20 December 1941, Page 10

21 December 1941 - Three airmen were killed when a machine from the Royal New Zealand Air Force station at Whenuapai crashed about five miles west of Helensville. The aircraft was engaged on training exercises. The victims were:
Flying-Officer Eric Trancis HOLDAWAY, aged 34, single. Next-of-kin: Mrs. V Holdaway, Turua (mother).
Sergeant-Pilot Eric ELDERSHAW, aged 21, single. Next-of-kin: Mr M P Eldershaw, 446 Queen Street, Auckland (father).
Sergeant-Pilot George Bevan EATHORNE, aged 27, married. Next-of-kin: Mrs G J Eathorne, 466 Hagley Avenue, Christchurch (wife). Sergeant-Pilot Eldershaw was the only son of Mr and Mrs P Eldershaw, of 446 Queen Street, Auckland He attended the Auckland Grammar School for several years, taking a prominent part in the ambulance section of the school cadets. He also played tennis and football at the school. Sergeant-Pilot Eldershaw joined the Air Force in June and completed his training three weeks ago. Sergeant-Pilot Eathorne was a well known athlete, having been a Canterbury Rugby representative. He was educated at the Christ-Church Boys High School, and later played Rugby for the Old Boys' Club. New Zealand Herald, Volume 78, Issue 24154, 22 December 1941, Page 4

26 December 1941 - The following Air Force casualties are announced:
FERGUSON, Maxwell Stewart (Flying-Officer). R.A.F., previously reported missing, death now officially presumed by the Air Ministry to have occurred in April — Mrs M Ferguson, Auckland (mother).
ANDERSON, Alexander Cairns (Pilot-Officer). R.N.Z.A.F., previously reported missing, death now officially presumed by the Air Ministry to have occurred in April — Miss J M Anderson, New South Wales (sister).
HASELDEN, Howard Clive McLeish (Sgt.) R.N.Z.A.F., previously reported missing, death now officially presumed by the Air Ministry to have occurred in May — Mr H T Haselden, Te Awamutu (father).
KING, Frederick John (Pilot-Officer), R.N.Z.A.F. previously reported injured in an aircraft accident, has now returned to his unit fit for full flying duties — Mr F H King, Palmerston North (father). Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 305, 26 December 1941, Page 4

31 December 1941 - Four members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force were killed when two aircraft collided in mid-air one mile north-west of Woodbourne at 10.15 am. Those killed were:—
COXON, Matthew William, Sergeant. Mrs. Margaret Cqxon, 18 Weld Street, Blenheim (w.).
HEWETT, James Duff, Leading Aircraftman. Mrs. Joan Hewett, 132 Onepu Road, Kilbirnie, Wellington (w.).
HILDRETH, Charles William, Leading Aircraftman. Mrs. Audrey Hildreth, 36 The Parade, Island Bay, Wellington(w:).
CLARIS, Gordon Keith, Leading Aircraftman. Mrs. Zona Claris, 152 Hataitai Road, Wellington (w.).
L.A.C. Hewett was the son of Squadron Leader J D Hewett, R.N.Z.A.F. One aircraft, occupied by Sergeant Coxon and L.A.C. Hewett, had been engaged in camera-gun practice and was returning to the aerodrome when it became involved in a collision with the second aircraft in which L.A.C. Hildreth and L.A.C. Claris were practising instrument take-offs. Both machines crashed near Renwicktown, being completely wrecked. Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 157, 31 December 1941, Page 6. Leading Aircraftsman Gordon Keith CLARIS, who was killed in an air crash neat Blenheim, was a nephew of Mr M W C Claris, commander of the Awakeri Home Guard. A sad coincidence is that deceased's elder brother was killed when an aeroplane in which he was a passenger crashed at Great Barrier Island three years ago. Thus his parents, Mr and Mrs W H Claris, of Wellington, have lost their two sons in air crashes in New Zealand. Bay of Plenty Beacon, Volume 4, Issue 200, 7 January 1942, Page 4

14 January 1942 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force were reported missing when the aircraft of which they were the occupants failed to return from a training flight. The aircraft left the aerodrome shortly before 3 p.m., in a northerly direction, and nothing has been-seen of it since. The occupants were: -
Leading Aircraftman Ronald Alfred Walter ABRAHAMS. Flight Sergeant W A Abrahams, R.N.Z.A.F. (f.).
Leading Aircraftman James Edgar Norman CORIN. Mrs H W Corin, 2 Nolan Road, Greenlane, Auckland (w.).
The aircraft is believed to be in the northern Wellington or southern Taranaki districts, but it may possibly have gone in some other direction on account of weather conditions. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIII, Issue 12, 15 January 1942, Page 8

22 January 1942 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force were reported missing when an aircraft of the R.N.Z.A.F. became overdue during a training flight. The missing airmen were:-
Leading Aircraftman Donald Hugh McKENZIE. Mr J R McKenzie, 483 Yaldhurst Road, Christchurch (f.).
Leading Aircraftman Jack Trevor VILLERS. Mr. W. J. Villers, care Newton King, Ltd., Stratford (t). Evening Post, Volume CXXXIII, Issue 18, 22 January 1942, Page 9. Later declared deceased.

23 January 1942 - As the result of two aircraft colliding on the ground at Lake Grassmere shortly after 3 o'clock, a trainee, Leading Aircraftman John William Thomas NELSON, was killed. His mother, Mrs H Nelson, resides at 111 Chaucer Road, Napier. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIII, Issue 20, 24 January 1942, Page 8

12 February 1942 - Aircraftman David Joseph SUTTON died as the result of injuries received when a Royal New Zealand Air Force plane, piloted by Sergeant-Pilot John Mortimer WARDEN, crashed when taking off at an aerodrome was the finding of the district coroner, Mr. L. A. Mcintosh, at the inquest completed at Kaitaia. Evidence was given by two commissioned members of the air force. When Sutton was admitted to the Mangonui County Hospital he was given the standard treatment for severe shock, said the medical superintendent, Mr. McKechnie. He was treated for burns to the face, and body. All afternoon his condition was satisfactory, but at 5 p.m. it suddenly deteriorated and he died an hour later. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIII, Issue 107, 8 May 1942, Page 6

16 February 1942 - An officer of the Royal New Zealand Air Force was killed and an airman pilot under training was seriously injured when an aircraft of the R.N.Z.A.F. crashed during a training flight. Pilot Officer Hugh Maxwell McGILL, 23 years, R.N.Z.A.F., whose next-of-kin is his father, Mr Hugh McGill, Rona Street, Eastbourne, was killed. Leading Aircraftman Geoffrey ROGERS, R.N.Z.A.F., whose next-of-kin is his father, Mr A G Rogers, 115 Tomahawk Road, Dunedin, was seriously injured and admitted to hospital. Evening Post, Volume C, Issue 40, 17 February 1942, Page 4

17 February 1942 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force were killed in an air accident when, during dual flying instruction, an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force crashed. The personnel concerned were:—
FERGUSON, Flying Officer John Angus, R.N.Z.A.F. Mrs. J. P. Ferguson, 4 Victoria Street, Dannevirke (w.).
HANSEN, L/Ac. Allan Russell, R.N.Z.A.F. Mrs. W. E. Hansen, 183 No. 3 Line. Wanganui (m.).Evening Post, Volume CXXXIII, Issue 41, 18 February 1942, Page 6

25 February 1942 - Two airmen of the Royal New Zealand Air Force were killed and a third injured when an aircraft crashed during training operations Personnel involved were:
Killed - Sergeant Alfred William TODMAN, 22 years — Mrs H M M Todman, Taneatua (wife).
Aircraftman Edward James MANNELL, 20 years — Mrs K Mannell, Masterton (mother).
Injured Aircraftman Geoffrey Hewson TATE — Mrs M Tate, Hastings (mother).
Sergeant Todman was aged 22 and his mother resides at 35 Domain Road, Whakatane. Aircraftman Mannell was aged 20 years, while Aircraftman Tate is aged 22. New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24209, 26 February 1942, Page 6.
Prior to his entering the Royal New Zealand Air Force twelve months ago Sergeant Todman was a member of the staff of the New Zealand Railways and was stationed at Taneatua where he had been for about two years. He was aged twenty-two years and rapidly became an efficient pilot — in fact so efficient that he was retained in New Zealand to act as instructor. He was a popular member of the Taneatua community being a prominent cricketer and member of the tennis club. His birth place was Aramoho, Wanganui, where he commenced his civilian career in the Railway Workshops. It was from that centre that he came to Taneatua. The late Sergeant Tollman's parents recently came to live at Whakatane and are resident in Domain Road and his widow Mrs H M M Todman resides at Taneatua. Bay of Plenty Beacon, Volume 5, Issue 22, 27 February 1942, Page 5

14 February 1942 - Pilot Officer John Reginald REENBERG, 26 years, was reported as killed in an air accident in England. He was a well known and popular resident of Whakatane before he left for England. While in this town he was employed by the Herd Council and had spent about two years with the local branch of the organisation before undergoing his training at Whenuapai and Hobsonville. He was English by birth and received his education at Taunton College, Somerset. His mother is resident in England. The late Pilot was a well travelled man having visited many countries, and while in the Bay he made many friends being a keen golfer and follower of other sports. His brother is with the N.Z.E.F. in the Middle East and was wounded in the Libyan campaign. Bay of Plenty Beacon, Volume 5, Issue 22, 27 February 1942, Page 5

03 March 1942 - A pilot with two black eyes and nose and chin injuries sat up in bed and chatted cheerily to the High Commissioner, Mr W J Jordan, who was visiting a Fleet Air Arm training station in Scotland. The pilot, Sub-Lieutenant E A Pope, of Auckland, suffered the injuries, as well as a twisted thigh, when he crashed into the sea on a training flight. But for a tobacco tin, full of tobacco, the gift of the National Patriotic Fund, Sub-Lieutenant Pope might have been drowned. The tin, which was bent in half, was in a trouser pocket. It prevented a thigh from being broken, acting as a cushion. He proudly showed it, full of sodden tobacco, to the High Commissioner. New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24272, 13 May 1942, Page 6

07 March 1942 - It was reported from Tokirama, near Ohura [Taranaki], that an aeroplane crashed near Blanchard's farm at 11.30 this morning. The plane burst into flames, and the only occupant, Ronald Frederick Charles JONES, of Palmerston North, was killed. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIII, Issue 56, 7 March 1942, Page 8

09 March 1942 - The following New Zealand air casualites Overseas were reported today.
STANFORD, Albert Desmond, Leading Aircraftman. R.N.Z.A.F., killed in action, Ohura.
O'HALLORAN, Leton Fergus, Leading Aircraftman, R.N.Z.A.F., Injured in enemy air raid. Te Awamutu.
COLVILLE, Robert Arthur, Sergeant. ij dangerously injured in air accident, Methven.
HIBELL, Bert Gordon, Sergeant, R.N.Z.A.F.. missing on air operations, Palmerston North.
KENNEDY Garnet Allen. Pilot Officer, R.N.Z.A.F., missing on air operations, Normanby.
MCCARTHY, Morris Donald Darwin. Pilot Officer, R.N.Z.A.F. missing on air operations.
VINCENT, John Noel, Sergeant, R.N.Z A F missing, Manurewa.
WOODHAM, Henry William, Sergeant R.N.Z.A.F. died of injuries received in air accident, Christchurch.
YEOMAN, Dallas Harley. Pilot officer. R.N.Z.A.F., missing on air operations. Herne Bay.
RECLASSIFICATIONS.
MINNIS, Richard John, Pilot Officer, R.N.Z.A.F. previously reported missing believed killed death now officially presumed as in September. Wellington.
NATION, John Ross, Sergeant, R.N.Z.A F previously reported missing, death now officially presumed as in July, Waipawa
KEA, William Samuel, Flight Lieutenant D.F.C. R.A.F. previously reported missing believed killed, death now officially presumed as in December, Auckland
REID, Ian Laurie, Sergeant. R.N Z.A.F previously reported missing, death now officially presumed as in July, Auckland. Evening Post, Volume CXXVIII, Issue 57, 9 March 1942, Page 7

22 March 1942 - The two aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force reported missing on March 22 have been discovered in a wrecked condition. One airman, Leading Aircraftman Jack Clarence VOSS, is safe and uninjured, but the other, Leading Aircraftman Brian Cecil HEAPS, was killed. The aircraft were discovered in mountainous country, and a ground party experienced great difficulty in reaching the scene of the crash. The next-of-kin of Leading Aircraftman B C Heaps was his father, Mr A Heaps, 189 Papanui Road, Christchurch.

26 March 1942 - Three members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force have been reported missing on a training flight. They are:—
COOK, Leading Aircraftman Cecil Harold. Mrs. W. B. Cook, 10 Duthie Street, Karori, Wellington (m.).
GODFREY, Leading Aircraftman Verdun Arthur. Mr. A. L. Godfrey, 1007 Waipuna Street, Hastings (f.).
PATERSON, Leading Aircraftman Donald Alexander. Mr. W: Paterson, 20 Tahora Avenue, Remuera, Auckland (f.) Evening Post, Volume CXXXIII, Issue 73, 27 March 1942, Page 6

26 March 1942 - Official advice has been received by Air Headquarters, Wellington, that the following New Zealand air personnel serving overseas have received awards:—
DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS. Flight Lieutenant Kenwyn Roland SUTTON, R.A.F - Flight Lieutenant Sutton was born in Wellington and was educated at the Palmerston North Boys' High School, and was prominent in sporting activities. He was a member of the Civil Reserve of Pilots, having trained at the Middle Districts Aero Club, Palmerston North. After appointment to the Royal New Zealand Air Force and further training at Wigram, he relinquished his appointment to take up a short service commission in the Royal Air Force in June, 1939. At the time of enlistment his next-of kin was his father, Mr A V Sutton, c/o Labour Department, Palmerston North.
Acting Flight Lieutenant Alec Edward BERRY, R.A.F - Acting Flight Lieutenant Berry has no official papers at Air Headquarters, Wellington.
DISTINGUISHED FLYING MEDAL, Sergeant Bert Sam WIPITI, R.N.Z.A.F - Sergeant Wipiti was born in New Plymouth in 1922 and was educated at the New Plymouth Boys' High School. His next-of-kin at time of enlistment was his father, Mr M T Wipiti, Lower Mangorei Road, New Plymouth. The citation accompanying this award states: "Sergeant Bert Sam Wipiti has carried out a large number of operational flights against the enemy, and he has displayed outstanding courage and determination while engaging large formations of enemy air craft. He has set a fine example to all."
Pilot Officer (formerly Sergeant) Charles Benedict WAREHAM, R.N.Z.A.F. - Pilot Officer Wareham was born in Kaikoura in March, 1916, and was educated at St. Bedes College, Christchurch. His next-of-kin is his mother, Mrs C Wareham, Kaikoura. The citation accompanying the award states: "Sergeant Charles Benedict Wareham "(now pilot officer) has carried out many long-distance photographic reconnaissance sorties, often in bad weather. He has obtained much valuable information of enemy targets and has displayed great skill, keenness and courage."
MEDAL OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE (MILITARY DIVISION). Sergeant James IRVINE, R.N.Z.A.F. - Sergeant Irvine was born in Wellington in January 1922, and was educated at Nelson College. His next-of-kin is his father, Mr J H Irvine, 115 Fowlds Avenue, Auckland. The citation accompanying the award states: "One night in November, 1941, Sergeant Irvine was wireless operator-air gunner of an aircraft which crashed on an aerodrome and burst into flames. He was catapulted through the roof and fell some distance away. On recovering from the shock and realising that he was comparatively uninjured, he dashed to the burning aircraft, entered the cockpit, and extricated the pilot, who was unconscious. Sergeant Irvine's prompt and gallant action in the face of considerable risk and regardless of the shock he had sustained in the crash, undoubtedly saved the life of the pilot. In carrying out the rescue, Sergeant Irvine sustained burns on his hands and face."

02 April 1942 - Three members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force were officially reported missing, believed killed, when an aircraft dived into the sea from a height of 1000 ft. The occupants were:—
Flying-Officer Patrick Howard McCAWE, 25 years - Mr P J McCawe, Wellington (father).
Pilot-Officer Nigel Bracken Hirst NEWTON, 32 years - Mrs A M Newton, Rangiora (wife).
Aircraftman (First-class) Cyril Vincent WILLIAMS, 22 years - Mr W W Williams, Auckland (father). Aircraftman Williams, a single man, aged 22, was the only son of Mr and Mrs W W Williams, of 33 The Parade, St. Helier's. Educated at St. Helier's school, a member of the clerical staff of the National Electrical Company, Limited, before enlisting in February, 1941, and had served at several air force stations in different parts of New Zealand. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIII, Issue 79, 4 April 1942, Page 5

26 May 1942 - A mid-air collision between two aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force resulted in the occupants of one machine, an instructor and a pupil pilot, losing their lives. They were:—
Flying Officer Robert William Douglas COWPER (next-of-kin, mother, Mrs A E Cowper, 5 Bell Street, Wanganui), who was the instructor.
Leading Aircraftman Derek Thomas LIPPITT (next-of-kin, father, Mr C.F Lippitt, Murray Street, Wallaceville). Evening Post, Volume CXXXIII, Issue 123, 27 May 1942, Page 6

06 June 1942 - The following air casualties are reported, all being members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force and of the rank of sergeant unless otherwise stated:
CALLAGHAN, Douglas, killed in an aircraft accident — Mrs M H Callaghan. Dunedin (mother).
HERBERT, Ronald Ernest, killed in an aircraft accident — Mr H H Herbert, Morrinsville (father).
WARE, Leicester Bond (Pilot-Officer), killed in action — Mr B G Ware, Christchurch (father).
WILKINSON, Mervyn, killed in an aircraft accident — Mr F Wilkinson, Huntly (father).
WILLIAMS, John Syddall, killed in an aircraft accident — Mr T S Williams, Greymouth (father)
DRAKE, Francis Ernest, R.A.F., of Auckland, previously reported missing, believed killed, death now officially presumed.
MANEY, Jack, of Auckland, previously reported missing, death now officially presumed.
SCRAGG, Reuben Acton, of Hastings, previously reported missing, believed killed, death now officially presumed.
STEWART, Charles (Pilot-Officer), R.A.F., of Wellington, previously reported missing, death now officially presumed.
WALKER, Graeme Stuart, of Te Kuiti, previously reported missing, death now officially presumed.
ANSFORD, Edward Drake, missing on air operations— Miss J C Ansford, New Plymouth (sister).
BARNETT, Matthew Garry (Flight-Lieutenant), missing on air operations — Mr M O Barnett. Wellington (father).
BLAKE, Harold Roger, D.F.C. (Flying-Officer), missing on operations — Mr H R Blake, Christchurch (father).
BOX, Denis Grant (Pilot-Officer), missing: on operations - Mr A E Box, Otahuhu (father).
FOX, John Joseph (Pilot-Officer), missing on air operations — Mrs M P Fox, Wellington (wife).
GANE, Geoffrey Arnold, missing on operations — Mr L W Gane. Blenheim (father).
McLEAN, Andrew Fraser, missing on operation - Mr A McLean, Whakatane (father).
McLEARY, Graeme John, of Napier, previously reported dangerously injured; now off seriously ill list.
MORTIMORE, Stanley Harold, missing on operation — Mr W H Mortimore, Whangarei
RYAN, John Patrick (Pilot-Officer), R.C.A.F., missing on air operations — Mrs M Ryan, Timaru (wife).
USHER, Benson (Pilot-Officer), missing on operations — Mrs B Usher, Patea (wife).
WOODROW, Frederick Edward, missing on operations — Mr Woodrow. Auckland (father).
YOUNG, Allen Norman, missing on operations — Mr T Young, Manurewa (father).

06 June 1942 - Admitted to hospital on Saturday morning after an accident during solo flying training, an airman-pilot under training, Leading Aircraftman Douglas MOIR, R.N.Z.A.F., died early yesterday morning. His mother is Mrs G Moir, 449 Victoria Street, Hamilton. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIII, Issue 133, 8 June 1942, Page 6

11 June 1942 - An Air Force plane which crashed in the main street at Gore at 10.40am resulted in the pilot being killed and several civilians injured. The machine was taking part in an Emergency Precautions Service exercise. Four persons standing on the road were hit by the wings as the plane swept along the street. It is officially announced that the sole occupant of the plane was Pilot Officer Geoffrey Thomas COLDHAM, 20 years, R.N.Z.A.F. He was fatally injured. Next-of-kin, father, Mr George Stewart Coldham, 4 Tawera Road, Green Lane, Auckland. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIII, Issue 136, 11 June 1942, Page 6

23 June 1942 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force were injured when an aircraft crashed while a pupil was undergoing instructional firing training. The personnel involved were: Pilot-Officer Peter Anders JACOBSEN, seriously injured — Mrs P A Jacobsen, New Plymouth (wife).
Leading-Aircraftman Gordon Vincent BUICK, seriously injured — Mr W V Buick, Masterton (father). New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24310, 26 June 1942, Page 2

27 June 1942 - The Distinguished Service Order has been awarded to acting-Group Captain Andrew McKEE, R.A.F., of Oxford, Canterbury. The citation states: Acting-Group Captain McKee has made 15 sorties since February, 1940, and the excellent performance of the squadrons at his station can largely be attributed to his personal example. He retains the absolute confidence of his captains and has played a large part in maintaining the high war effort of his group.
Distinguished Flying Cross - Pilot-officer James Kenneth CLIMIE, R.N.Z.A.F., of Wellington. The citation to Pilot-Officer Climie's award states that he has participated in 33 sorties, the majority of which were against heavilydefended targets. He assisted in maintaining the morale of his squadron during a period of heavy losses.
Distinguished Flying Cross - Acting-Flight-Lieutenants Stephen Delancy WATTS, R.N.Z.A.F., of Morrinsville. Acting Flight Lieutenant Watts, says the citation, has displayed courage and leadership to a nign degree. Twice he has brought back planes after serious damage. He participated in attacks against Kiel, Wilhelmshaven, Brest, Frankfurt and Hamburg.
Distinguished Flying Cross - Denis MILLER, R.N.Z.A.F., of Kohimarama. The citation to the award to acting- Flight Lieutenant Miller says he has carried out numerous operations throughout the winter. He has completed seven successful mine-laying missions and participated in combined operations at Vaagso, where he laid a smokescreen from 70 feet. He also took part in the low-level raid against the Renault works in Paris.
The following members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force have been awarded Distinguished Flying Medals:
Flight-Sergeant Jack Menzies SMITH, of Te Awamutu - Flight Sergeant Smith, says the citation, was the rear-gunner of a Stirling bomber in a daylight attack against Brest on December 18, 1941. He shot down one of two fighters which approached. During a later sortie he probably shot down another attacking fighter. He has maintained a high stand of gunnery.
Flight- Sergeant Walter Jack RUNCIMAN, of Mount Roskill. Flight Sergeant Runciman's citation says: He has consistently pressed home attacks in a Stirling. Two enemy fighters damaged his plane over Denmark on April 23, 1942. The crew prepared for a crash landing, but in spite of the long sea crossing, Flight Sergeant Runciman landed successfully, after instructing his crew to bale out first.
Flight-Sergeant Colin John STIRLING, of Invercargill - Flight Sergeant Stirling, says the citation, has completed many successful sorties, including attacks against Le Havre, Brest, Saint Nazaire, Mannheim, and the daylight attack against German battleships on February 12, 1942. He has twice returned to his base with a damaged plane, and has shown fearlessness and skill which are an inspiration to his squadron.
Auckland Star, Volume LXXIII, Issue 150, 27 June 1942, Page 5

29 June 1942 - FLEET AIR ARM PILOTS - SEVERAL NEW ZEALANDERS - The following New Zealanders of the Fleet Air Arm are serving in the aircraft-carrier Victorious: Lieutenant-Commander A P NAPPER (Christchurch), Surgeon-Lieutenant N W PRYDE (Otago), Sub-Lieutenants (pilots) A J HUGILL and N MUNRO (Auckland), H MORRISON (Masterton), and A LAWRENCE (Carterton). In the aircraft-carrier Furious are Sub-Lieutenants R SPACKMAN (Wellington) and G HARRIS (Wellington), S T WOODROFFE (Auckland) and T W BASSETT (Christchurch). A 22-year-old airman from Waipawa, E H HARDY, D.F.C., has been promoted to wing-commander. He is one of the youngest New Zealanders of this rank. He directed Beaufighters from the deck of a warship in the Vaagso raid and participated in the recent attack against the Prinz Eugen. New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24312, 29 June 1942, Page 4

25 July 1942 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force were killed in an aircraft collision in the South Island. They were:
Leading Aircraftman James Hylton MEAD. Next-of-kin, Mr W J Mead, 307 Happy Valley Road. Wellington (father).
Leading Aircraftman Frank Hayman GOLDSMITH. Next-of-kin, Mrs A McCormick, Berry Street, Westport (mother).
The airmen were pupil pilots undergoing training. The machines collided during solo flights. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 22, 25 July 1942, Page 6

25 July 1942 - Two New Zealand Army Officers and four members of the R.N.Z.A.F. were reported missing during the course of an aircraft flight over a sea route. Intensive searches are being carried out in the area where the aircraft was last seen, but unfortunately were without result. The personnel involved were:—
Flying-Officer Donald Arthur ANDERSON, R.N.Z.A.F., - Son of Thomas Donald Anderson and of Helen May Anderson (nee Laurie); husband of Bobbie Rose Anderson, of Orakei, Auckland, New Zealand [wife, Mrs Anderson, 106, Paritai Drive, Orakei, Auckland.]
Leading-Aircraft man Arthur Norman CLAYTON, R.N.Z.A.F., - Son of Mr. and Mrs J Clayton, of Cambridge, Auckland, New Zealand; husband of Dorothy Ivy Clayton, of St. Albans, Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand. [wife, Mrs Clayton, 65 Hamilton Road, Cambridge.]
Pilot-Officer Clive Gaby IBBOTSON, R.N.Z.A.F. -Son of Cyril Arthur and Doris Aplin Ibbotson, of Auckland City, New Zealand. [mother, Mrs D A Ibbotson, Heaton Terrace, Brooklyn, Wellington.
Lieutenant John Christie LESLIE, N.Z.M.F., - wife, Mrs Leslie, c/o Mr. T J Coulter, Kaitaia. [Husband of Clarice Dinah Leslie, of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.]
Major-General Owen Herbert MEAD, C.B.E., D.S.0. - Son of Edward and Flora Mead; husband of Barbara Mead (nee Loughman) [Otane, Hawkes' Bay].
Sergeant Roland Harvey Winch WYBOURNE, R.N.Z.A.F., - Son of Roland David and Evelyn Kate Wybourne, of Waverley, Wellington, New Zealand. [mother, Mrs E K Wybourne, Gloag Street, Waverley.]
Major-General Owen Mead, D.S.0., who is N.Z.E.F. Pacific Commander, has had a distinguished military career. He served with the New Zealand Territorial Force before the Great War and went overseas as a lieutenant with the Canterbury Regiment in the Main Body. He served with the New Zealand Division throughout the war and attained the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He was in command in turn of the First and Second Battalions Canterbury Regiment. He was wounded on two occasions, mentioned in dispatches twice and was awarded the D.S.O. Returning to New Zealand in 1919. he was appointed to the New Zealand Staff Corps with the rank of captain. Later he was for two years at the Staff College, Camberley, England, graduating from there in 1928. In the following year he was attached to the War Office in London. Later he was appointed Adjutant and Quartermaster-General of the New Zealand Military Forces and continued in that position, with a break of a year, 1937-38, as Officer Commanding the Northern Military District with the temporary rank of colonel, until after the outbreak of the present war. He also held the post of second member of the Army Board. Following the outbreak of the present war he was appointed Officer Commanding the Southern Military District with the rank of brigadier and continued in that office until February of this year when ne was promoted to the temporary rank of major-general and took up the post of General Officer Commanding N.Z.E.F. Pacific Section. He followed Major-General W. H. Cunningham in that appointment. He is married and has two daughters. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 24, 28 July 1942, Page 3

27 July 1942 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force were killed and a third received serious injuries in an aircraft collision in the South Island. The personnel concerned were:—
Killed - Flying Officer Kenneth Sinclair BLAIR, R.N.Z.A.F. next-of-kin, wife, Mrs C M Blair, 11 Roscoe Terrace, Wadestown, Wellington.
L/Ac Leonard Matthew KEAT, next-of-kin, wife, Mrs I J Keat, Old Taupo Road. Rotorua.
Seriously Injured - L/Ac. Robert Baines KNIGHT, nextof-kin, father, Mr H Knight, R.M.D., Waiuku.
Flying Officer Blair was well known in Wellington. He was a nephew of Mr Justice Blair, for whom he acted as associate at one time. His wife was formerly Miss Geraldine Litchfield. daughter of Dr and Mrs Murray Litchfield, of Wellington. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 24, 28 July 1942, Page 4

05 August 1942 - A sergeant pilot of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, Alfred Reginald Philip SAUL, was killed in an aircraft accident while carrying out combat exercises. His mother, Mrs R W Saul, lives at 3 Aurora Street, Petone. Sergeant Pilot Saul was a son of Mrs and the late Mr R W Saul, of Aurora Street, Petone. He took part in the campaign in Malaya ahd was among the last to be evacuated. During the campaign he had to abandon his plane three times owing to engine trouble, and on one occasion he came down in the sea. Another time he received a shrapnel wound in the arm while on the ground. He was one of the youngest New Zealanders in Singapore. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 32, 6 August 1942, Page 3

18 August 1942 - An aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force in which Leading Aircraftman John Ronald Scott ORBELL was undergoing solo acrobatic training is missing from a South Island flying training school. Leading Aircraftman Orbell's nextof-kin is his father, Major R G S Orbell, of Oamaru, at present in Dunedin. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 43, 19 August 1942, Page 3

23 August 1942 - An aircraft of the R.N.Z.A.F. engaged in co-operation with a Home Guard unit has been reported missing. The pilot was
Pilot Officer Mason Irvine ELLIOTT, and with him as a passenger was
Lieutenant Harold Francis BOLLARD. The wives of the missing men — Mrs K Elliott and Mrs H E Bollard — reside in Wellington. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIII, Issue 199, 24 August 1942, Page 4

04 September 1942 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force received injuries at a South Island station when an aircraft crashed on landing. The personnel concerned were:—
Flying Officer John Hugh Mehaffey CARSWELL, who was slightly injured.
Aircraftman Carrell William MOOAR, who was severely injured. The mother of Flying Officer Carswell is Mrs K E Carswell, 346 High Street, Dunedin, and the wife of Aircraftman Mooar is Mrs. A. E. Mooar, 10 Sutherland Street, Hillmorton, Christchurch. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 58, 5 September 1942, Page 8

24 September 1942 - NEW ZEALAND ROLL OF HONOUR. IN MEMORIAM - SMITH — In proud and loving memory of our brothers, Flying Officer Harry Francis Burton SMITH, who lost his life through enemy action over Germany, September 24, 1942, aged 25, and Corporal Raymond Bernard SMITH, accidentally killed, in aircraft crash September 30, 1940,aged 22. [see above] Evening Post, Volume CXXXVI, Issue 74, 24 September 1943, Page 1

24 September 1942 - NEW ZEALAND ROLL OF HONOUR. IN MEMORIAM - HENRY - Sergeant John Wallace HENRY, R.N.Z.A.F. In loving memory of my dear husband, killed on air operations September 24, 1942. Laid to rest in Denmark. Sadly missed by his loving wife Aileen and wee daughter Berwyn. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVI, Issue 74, 24 September 1943, Page 1

26 September 1942 - Reported missing on operations Flying-Officer Donald Arthur ADAMS is the youngest son of Mrs F M Adams, of Dedwood Terrace, Ponsonby, and the late Mr C W Adams. Flying-Officer Adams, who is 24, was educated at the Auckland Grammar School and Auckland University College, where he graduated Bachelor of Commerce. He was on the staff of the Bank of New Zealand at Hamilton when he enlisted in the Royal New Zealand Air Force. He was trained in New Zealand and gained his wings and commission before leaving for England in August 1941. Flying-Officer Adams took part in one of the 1000 bomber raids over Germany before he transferred to the Middle East. Recently a plane in which he was flying with Squadron-Leader F J Steel, D.F.C., of Napier, had to make a crash landing in Qattara Depression. Squadron-Leader Steel and Flying-officer Adams set off across the depression and had covered about 50 miles, travelling by night, before being picked up on the third day. Flying-Officer Adams, who was reported injured on active service in August, was promoted to his present rank from that of pilot officer in September. A brother, Flying-Officer J W Adams, is on the instructional staff of the Air Force. New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24427, 10 November 1942, Page 5

27 September 1942 - LONG — On September 27, 1942, at Wellington Hospital, Pilot Officer Arthur Clendon LONG, son of the Rev F C Long and Mrs Long, 22 Kelburn Pde, Wellington; aged 29. After a long illness, arising out of an aeroplane accident on January 6, 1941, Pilot Officer Arthur C Long died last night at the Wellington Hospital. He was 29 years of age. His death was somewhat unexpected, because a few days ago he was cheerful and well and was getting about occasionally in a wheeled chair. Pilot Officer Long, who was well known in University circles in Wellington, crashed in Waitemata Harbour with another officer while in a dual-control training plane. Pilot Officer Long received severe injuries to his back and was badly injured in the face and leg. The last two injuries cleared up, and he was brought to Wellington after three months in the Auckland- Hospital. After passing his examinations with top marks, he was transferred to a northern station as instructor only two or three weeks before the accident occurred. He was educated at Wellington College and Victoria University College, where he gained his B.Com. degree. He was a keen hockey and tennis player and took a great interest in the affairs of the University. Prior to joining the Air Force he was employed in a State Department. in Wellington. Pilot Officer Long was the son of the Rev. F. C. Long, general secretary to the New Zealand Anglican Board of Missions in Wellington, and Mrs. Long. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 77, 28 September 1942, Page 3

29 September 1942 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost their lives, four others are reported missing, believed drowned, and a seventh was admitted to hospital with shock and bruises as the result of an aircraft accident at a South Island air station. The personnel concerned were:—
Died of Injuries
Pilot-Officer Dean Rainsford HORROCKS, aged 20 — Mrs L R B Horrocks, Takapuna (mother).
Sergeant Vincent Charles HILL, aged 23 - Mr C V Hill, Christchurch (father).
Missing, Believed Drowned
Sergeant Gordon Francis STEVENS - Mrs G Stevens, New Plymouth (wife).
Sergeant Victor Newell CHAPPIE - Mr C. G Chappie, Hawera (father).
Sergeant Jack Gilbert BRYSON - Mrs P Bryson, Christchurch (mother).
Aircraftman (First-Class) John Gordon DAVIS - Mrs E G Davis, Wanganui (mother).
Shock and Bruises, Admitted to Hospital
Warrant-Officer James Alexander COLWAY - Mrs F A Colway, Masterton (mother). Auckland Star, Volume LXXIII, Issue 231, 30 September 1942, Page 4 and New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24412, 23 October 1942, Page 2

30 September 1942 - A member of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, Leading Aircraftman Denis Charles Joseph MOONEY, lost his life in an aircraft accident at a South Island Station, when the aircraft of which he was the sole occupant crashed. His next-of kin is his father, Mr James Mooney, 93 London Street, Dunedin. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 80, 1 October 1942, Page 3

06 October 1942 - A member of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost his life when the aircraft in which he was engaged on solo flying training crashed at a North Island air station. He was Leading-Aircraftman Chester Wynter PROBERT, aged 28 years. His mother is Mrs G E T Probert, of Timaru. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIII, Issue 236, 6 October 1942, Page 4

23 October 1942 - An aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, engaged in a coastal training flight failed to return to the base [New Plymouth]. A search was immeliately instituted without success. The occupants of the plane were:
Pilot-Officer Rodney George DANDY, 33 years - Mrs R G Dandy, Wellington (wife).
Sergeant Douglas Gordon MARTYN, 23 years - Mrs E M Martyn, Waihi (mother).
Sergeant Graham MacLeod MARTIN, 27 years - Mrs G M Martin, Christchurch (wife).
Sergeant Edward Reid DODSON, 27 years - Mrs V L Dodson, Nelson (wife). New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24414, 26 October 1942, Page 2

24 October 1942 - An aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force at a South Island station was reported overdue. A report from a resident of the district [near Ward] stated that he had heard an aircraft labouring overhead, following an explosion. Later the aircraft was found and both the occupants were dead. They were:
Sergeant Graham Ballantyne STEELE, 21 — Mr B Steele, Walton, Waikato (father).
Leading Aircraftman Charles Arthur RICKEY, 23 - Mrs F P Rickey, Waipukurau (mother). Auckland Star, Volume LXXIII, Issue 253, 26 October 1942, Page 2

26 October 1942 - Flight Lieutenant Keith Stuart Strode PENNY, 24 years, R.N.Z.A.F., was killed in an air accident at a North Island [Tauranga] station when the aircraft in which he was flying solo crashed. His wife, Mrs D R Penny, lives at Mount Maunganui. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 102, 27 October 1942, Page 3

28 October 1942 - In Memoriam - BOMFORD - Pilot Officer John Hamilton BOMFORD killed in an air crash over England. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25339, 22 October 1945, Page 1

28 October 1942 - When a trainer type of aircraft dived into the sea off the east coast of the South Island, the pilot, Flying Officer James Finlay CRUICKSHANK received shock and slight abrasions, and the passenger, Sergeant Neill Ernest KING, 27 years, was reported missing, believed drowned. Flying Officer Cruickshank's father is Mr J R Cruickshank, New Plymouth, and Sergeant King's father is Mr F E King, 98 Bristol Street, St. Albans, Christchurch. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 104, 29 October 1942, Page 3

29 October 1942 - Pilot-Officer Richmond Lovett MEREDITH, reported missing on active service, is a son of Mr and Mrs R D Meredith, of Otorohanga. Pilot-Officer Meredith was born at Otorohanga 22 years ago and was educated at St. Joseph's Convent School, Te Awamutu. He took a keen interest in football and athletic sports, and was a member of the Otorohanga fire brigade. Pilot-Officer Meredith was trained in New Zealand and Canada, where he was granted a commission. He later served in the Ferry Command for three months, and after that was posted to a bomber squadron in Britain. New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24463, 22 December 1942, Page 5

30 October 1942 - A Royal New Zealand Air Force plane engaged in a flight over the sea from a North Island air station was reported overdue. The occupants were:-
Pilot Officer Stanley Gordon BROMLEY, 28 years (father, Mr W Bromley, 78 Rongotai Terrace, Wellington).
Pilot Officer Robert DENT, 28 years (mother, Mrs E Dent, 208 Devon Street West, New Plymouth).
Pilot Officer Charles Henry GUNN, 22 years (father, Mr. W. Gunn, Wataroa, South Westland). Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 107, 2 November 1942, Page 3

07 November 1942 - When aircraft in which they were engaged in solo flying practice collided in mid-air in the South Island at 2.30 p.m, Leading-Aircraftman John Oughton MITCHELL, 19 years, whose father is Mr F C Mitchell, of Tuturau, Southland, was killed instantly. Leading-Aircraftman R J [Raoul John] WISKER, the other pilot, escaped by parachute. New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24426, 9 November 1942, Page 2

15 November 1942 - A member of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, Sergeant Arthur Francis LAW, 20 years, lost his life in an air accident near a North Island station [Greytown] when the plane in which he was engaged in flying training crashed. His mother is Mrs A Law, of Picton. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIII, Issue 271, 16 November 1942, Page 4

16 November 1942 - A member of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, Sergeant John Edwin DORNBUSCH, 23 years, lost his life when the aircraft in which he was flying solo crashed. His father is Mr W A Dornbusch, of Upper Hutt. Leading-Aircraftman George Maitland Doig FINDLAY received slight injuries and was admitted to a station hospital when the aircraft in which he was undergoing solo flying training spun into the ground early yesterday morning. His father is Mr G Findlay, 0 f Auckland. Severe injuries to a leg were received by Leading-Aircraftman Norman Deans PORRITT while undergoing small arms training at a North Island air station yesterday afternoon. His father is Mr H E Porritt, of Cambridge. New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24434, 18 November 1942, Page 2

18 November 1942 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force undergoing training at a South Island station lost their lives when an aircraft crashed. They were:
Pilot-Officer Walter Keith WEBB, 32 years - Mrs W B Webb, Blenheim (mother).
Leading-Aircraftman Ian Caldwell McINTYRE, 23 years — Mr J E McIntyre, Otara, Southland (father). New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24435, 19 November 1942, Page 2 and New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24527, 9 March 1943, Page 2

05 December 1942 - Lieutenant Thomas Noel BUSH, 27, Fleet Air Arm, [Royal New Zealand Naval Volunteer Reserve] was killed in an air crash. He was the eldest son of the late Mr C Bush and Mrs M R Bush, Maurice Terrace, Wellington, and was a brother of Flight Lieutenant Roy Bush, D.F.C. CWGC and Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 141, 11 December 1942, Page 3

06 December 1942 - Reported killed on operations, Sergeant-Pilot Wilford John (Jack) COLLINS was the husband of Mrs Z F Collins, of Auckland, and twin son of Mr and Mrs E S. Collins, of 70 Green Lane Remuera. He was a former pupil of the Seddon Memorial Technical College and entered the Royal New Zealand Air Force in November, 1941, after being employed in a city firm. He qualified as a pilot before leaving New Zealand, and in Britain was posted to operations with a bomber squadron. New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24463, 22 December 1942, Page 5. He is buried in the Cottesmore (St. Nicholas) Churchyard Extension. RSA Review - Spring 2014 p12. From Melissa Pilbeam in Cottesmore - I have posted messages on so many websites in the last few months and had pretty much given up hope of finding any more information other than the pieces I’d found on Papers Past and the RAF Museum! I knew that Zena Florrie Collins had remarried as the author, Errol Martyn, referred to the surname of "Somerville" in his book about the RNZAF but I couldn’t find any more details at all. I have tried to try and find any other family members but have drawn a blank really despite putting enquiries in local papers where I thought family might be ( there was a reference to Eunice and Bob and Ronnie from Otorohanga in one newspaper memorial notice ). It seems that Sgt Collins died in a training accident on the Wellington bomber very close to RAF Cottesmore airfield at just after midnight on 6th December according to RAF records at the time — it seemed that the pilot raised the flaps instead of the undercarriage and the plane crashed almost immediately after take-off. Most of the crew died ( including a Canadian and two British aircrew) but there was one survivor.

07 December 1942 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force are reported missing in an aircraft which was engaged in gunnery exercises from a North Island station [New Plymouth]. They are; -
Sergeant Peter Albert MOREY, 23 years son of Mr A Morey, of 12 Watson Street, Wellington,
and Leading Aircraftman Thomas Patrick DAVIES, 29 years, whose mother is Mrs M K Davies, 8 Cleveland Street, Brooklyn. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 138, 8 December 1942, Page 3

08 December 1942 - Three members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force have been reported missing in an aircraft overdue from a reconnaissance flight from a North Island station. The personnel concerned are
Flying Officer Harry KINDER, 27 years (Mrs G M Kinder, c/o Mrs. H. Stone, 51 Richmond Street, Petone, wife)
Flying Officer Charles Neville TURNBULL, 29 years (Mr C L M Turnbull 138 Fitzherbert Avenue, Palmerston North, father)
and Sergeant Nepia STEWART, 41 years (Mrs M Stewart, 156 Rutene Road, Gisborne, wife). Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 139, 9 December 1942, Page 3

11 December 1942 - DOUGLAS, John MacKenzie, Temporary Sub-Lieut. (A), R.N.Z.N.V.R., died as result of injuries sustained in air crash. NOK - Mr H M Douglas, 110 Pownall Street, Masterton (f.) ROBERTSON, Alexander Walter. Temporary Sub-Lieut. (A), R.N.Z.N.V.R., injured in air accident - NOK Mr A M Robertson, Box 65, Auckland (f.). Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 149, 21 December 1942, Page 3

12 December 1942 - When an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force struck a tree while making an emergency landing during bad weather, the occupant, Sergeant Blake Francis SCOTT, 21 years, lost his life. His mother is Mrs K H Scott, Haumoana, Hastings. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 143, 14 December 1942, Page 3

17 December 1942 - Four members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost their lives when an aircraft engaged on a test flight crashed. They were:—
Flight Lieutenant Graham Wellesley HAMLIN, 24 years, D.F.C. - Mr J W Hamlin, 14 Ngapuhi Road, Remuera, Auckland (f.) - Flight Lieutenant Hamlin, who was aged 23, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wellesley Hamlin, of Ngapuhi Road, Remuera. Like Pilot Officer McGregor, he was one of a number ot New Zealand airmen who were brought back to the Dominion to reinforce the Air Force here after serving for long periods on operations against the enemy overseas. When he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross in September 1941, the citation stated that he always undertook his flights with clockwork regularity in all kinds of weather and had often returned with his aircraft extensively damaged. The fearless, resolute manner in which he had attacked his targets, it was added, was worthy of the highest praise. Flight Lieutenant Hamlin was educated at the Waitara School and Nelson College and before his enlistment was on the staff of the Bank of New Zealand at Waitara. He entered the Royal New Zealand Air Force in January, 1940, and left for Britain eight months later after being appointed to a commission. He was afterwards posted to the No. 75 New Zealand Bomber Squadron, with which he completed a very large number of operational flights. He was among the members of his squadron who had bombed Berlin.
Pilot Officer Ian McGREGOR - 26 years - Mr W McGregor, 3 Richborne Street, Kingsland, Auckland (f.). Pilot Officer McGregor, who was aged 26, was the youngest son of Mr W McGregor, of Richborne Street, Kingsland. Educated at the Kowhai Intermediate School and the Seddon Memorial Technical College, where he was a member of the first Rugby fifteen and cricket eleven, Pilot Officer McGregor also played senior grade football for the Manukau Club. He enlisted in the Air Force soon after the outbreak of war and left for England in August, 1940, upon completing his training in New Zealand. He was attached to the New Zealand Bomber Squadron for a time and had taken part in many operational flights over Germany. He was later transferred to a squadron in the Middle East and returned to New Zealand last year.
Corporal John Vaughan BARRACLOUGH, 29 years - Mrs E T Barraclough, 56 Hawker Street, Wellington (m.).
Aircraftman James MITCHELL, 43 years - Mr J Ashworth, Commercial Bank, Prestonpans, Scotland (cousin).
Both the Aucklanders killed in the aircraft accident, Flight Lieutenant Hamlin and Pilot Officer McGregor, were to have been married in Auckland the next day. They were close fnends and had served together for a period in the famous No. 75 New Zealand Bomber Squadron in Britain. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 147, 18 December 1942, Page 3

18 December 1942 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force were officially classified as missing when an aircraft crashed into the sea off the west coast of the North Island [near Paekakariki]. The personnel concerned were:—
Pilot Officer Gerald Temple ODLIN, 26 years - Mr A E Odlin, 56 Mountain Road, Epsom, Auckland (f).
Leading Aircraftman William Walker JOHNSON, 29 years - Mr H Johnson, 40 Tempest Road, Beeston, Leeds, England (f.). Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 148, 19 December 1942, Page 8

18 December 1942 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost their lives in a mid-air collision between two aircraft at a South Island Air Station. They were:—
Flying Officer Cyril Griffith William HENDERSON, 26 years - Mrs F E Henderson, 101 Winchester Street, Christchurch (W.).
Leading Aircraftman Eric Mark BROADHURST, 22 years - Mr M Broadhurst, Suburban Post Office, Kaikoura (f.).
The occupant of the other machine, Leading Aircraftman Keith Owen WHITEHOUSE (father, Mr H S Whitehouse, 128 Onslow Road, Khandallah), escaped without injury, but was admitted to hospital for observation. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIV, Issue 148, 19 December 1942, Page 8

21 December 1942 - An Air Travel Company's aeroplane which came down into the sea near Westport resulting in the loss of life of the four passengers, had proceeded only a short distance over the sea from Westport when it lost the starboard propeller at a height of 4000 ft. The pilot, Flight-Lieutenant A C BAINES endeavoured to return to Westport working on one engine, but gradually lost height and finally alighted on the sea. The impact caused the tail to lift. Prior to alighting the pilot informed the four passengers and opened the door. All except one, Mr JOHNSTONE, [also recorded as Albert JOHNSON] were able to take advantage of the pilot's act of precaution. The plane remained afloat for about 20 minutes, with the passengers standing on the wings. It then sank, taking Mr Johnstone with it. Later Messrs McBRIDE and WALTER [also recorded as A WALTERS of Haast] also disappeared. The pilot had in the meantime stripped off his clothes. When a Union Company's ship, which was about four miles distant, was made aware of the accident and launched a lifeboat, he and one of the passengers, Mr Michael HEARTY [66 years], were taken on board. Mr. Hearty was then in a very low condition as a result of the ordeal and did not long survive. It is understood that Mr Geoffrey Colin McBRIDE aged 29, who was one of the lost passengers, was on his way to Auckland, where his father, owner and trainer of the pacer True Guide, met with an accident at the trotting meeting on Saturday. Flight-Lieutenant Baines, who was trained in Canterbury, has been flying for eight years. He was attached to the Air Force and lately loaned to Air Travel (N.Z.) Limited. This was the first accident in the history of the company. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIII, Issue 302, 22 December 1942, Page 6

05 January 1943 - Reported killed as the result of a flying accident at a southern aerodrome, Sergeant Ronald Hamilton BELL, 26 years was the third son of Mrs M G Bell and the late Mr J Bell, of Te Poi, Matamata, and, like his father, he evinced an early interest in aviation. He resigned from the police force to join the Air Force a few days before such resignations were prohibited. He was an original member of the Te Poi Boy Scouts, and later became assistant scoutmaster. He was very popular in the district, and was always ready to lend a hand in social activities. The late Sergeant-Pilot Bell was 26 years of age. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24477, 9 January 1943, Page 8

07 January 1943 - In an aircraft accident near a South Island station [West Eyreton] of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, during an instructional flight, two airmen lost their lives. They were
Pilot Officer Edward George Russell MORLEY, 26 years, whose next-of-kin is his wife, Mrs N Morley 1054 Railway Settlement, Masterton,
and Leading Aircraftman Eldred Charles HART, 27 years, whose father, Mr A Hart, lives in the Ashburton district. Evening Post, Volume CXXXV, Issue 6, 8 January 1943, Page 3

09 January 1943 - Pilot-Officer Frank CHAMBERS was the son of Mr and Mrs H Chambers, of Miramar, Wellington. In 1939 he entered the Auckland Teachers Training College, and Auckland University College. He began his Air Force training in May, 1941 and was commissioned before leaving for Britain the following November. He was later posted to a Wellington bomber squadron. CWGC and New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24477, 9 January 1943, Page 8

14 January 1943 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost their lives in an aircraft accident near a South Island training station. They were:
Flying-Officer Jack Alfred KING, 24 years, son of Mr George King, of Auckland
Leading-Aircraftman John Stanley GORDON, 29 years, son of Mrs M M Gordon, of Heriot. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24483, 16 January 1943, Page 6

16 January 1943 - PERKS, Thomas Edgar, of the Royal Air Force Research Department, England, dearly-loved eldest son of Edgar Perks, 20 Koraha Street, Remuera, and the late Mrs Perks, killed instantly in an aeroplane crash in Scotland; aged 46. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24548, 2 April 1943, Page 1

18 January 1943 - In a collision during formation flying practice at a North Island station of the Royal New Zealand Air Force one airman lost has life and another came down by parachute and suffered only slight injuries. The man killed was
Sergeant Douglas Graham McMASTER, 21 years, whose mother, Mrs K McMaster, lives at 78 Hinau Street, Riccarton, Christchurch,
and the injured man is Flying Officer Lionel Recklaw RENOLDS, whose mother is Mrs D Renolds, of Te Pahu, Te Awamutu. Evening Post, Volume CXXXV, Issue 15, 19 January 1943, Page 4

23 January 1943 - It is officially announced that an airman pilot under training, Leading Aircraftman John Keith RUTHERFORD [RUTHERFURD] 22 years, lost his life in an aircraft, accident during forced landing practice at a South Island air station. Leading Aircraftman Rutherford's next of kin is his father, Mr J W Rutherford, of Palmerston North. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 20, 25 January 1943, Page 4

24 January 1943 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost their lives when an aircraft engaged in flying training crashed early in the afternoon [in the upper reaches of the Waitemata Harbour]. The personnel concerned were:
Pilot-Officer Rolph Joseph BENFIELD, of Wellington, 31 years.
Pilot-Officer Cyril Henry COMRIE, of Wellington, 26 years. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24492, 27 January 1943, Page 2 and Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 58, 10 March 1943, Page 4

25 January 1943 - When an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force engaged in operational training exercise flew into a cliff during fog the entire crew of four lost their lives [at Omata, near New Plymouth]. The personnel concerned were:—
Flight-Lieutenant John Humfrey DEANS, of Bulls, 28 years.
Flying-Officer James Derrick PHILSON, son of Mr R T Philson, Auckland, 21 years.
Sergeant John Andrews POWER, of Okato, New Plymouth, 23 years.
Sergeant Hugh Winton STEEL, of Wellington, 25 years.
Flying-Officer Philson was the younger son of Mr and Mrs R T Philson, of Stanley Bay. He was educated at the Takapuna Grammar School and left New Zealand for Canada in November, 1941. He gained a commission in Canada and was brought back to New Zealand last August on appointment to a bomber reconnaissance squadron. He was aged 20 and was keenly interested in yachting, sailing his father's A class yacht Ngataringa. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24492, 27 January 1943, Page 2 and Evening Post, Volume CXXXV, Issue 79, 3 April 1943, Page 7

27 January 1943 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost their fives during a night flying test at a South Island air station owhen their aircraft crashed. The personnel concerned were:
Sergeant Louis Joseph Norfolk [Louis John Norfolk] GUMBLEY, of Wanganui, 21 years.
Acting-Corporal Eric Courtney BELL, of Wanganui, 21 years. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24494, 29 January 1943, Page 2

29 January 1943 - When the aircraft he was piloting crashed during an operation training exercise from a North Island air training station, Sergeant Douglas Hepburn AYSON, 22 years, whose mother, Mrs D Ayson, lives in Gore, was killed. He was the sole occupant of the plane. The cause of the accident is obscure. Evening Post, Volume CXXXV, Issue 25, 30 January 1943, Page 8

03 February 1943 - Four members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost their lives when an aircraft from a South Island Air Station crashed. The personnel concerned were: —
Pilot Officer Basil Clement HARDING, 22 years (Father, Mr N C Harding, Town Clerk, Hastings.)
Flying Officer Walter Donald McKAY, 21 years (Mother, Mrs D J McKay, Box 11, Mangonui.)
Flying Officer Sidney Eric TANNER, 26 years (Father, Mr Joseph Tanner, St. Andrews Road, Havelock North.)
Sergeant John Joseph McALEER, 22 years (Father, Mr John McAleer, Morvent, South Canterbury.) Evening Post, Volume CXXXV, Issue 29, 4 February 1943, Page 4

05 February 1943 - Carrying nine passengers in addition to the pilot and co-pilot, and a quantity of mail, the Union Airways interisland aeroplane Kuaka crashed on the side of Flagstaff Hill shortly after 8am when leaving Dunedin for the north, in heavy mist and rain. Visibility was almost nil, and the port wing grazed the side of a ridge, causing the plane to swerve round and land in a patch of tall gorse. The passengers and pilots had a miraculous escape, as the locality is strewn with boulders and stumps and is broken with small gullies and depressions. Fortunately the plane was brought to an even keel before landing, and it did not overturn. The only injuries suffered were bruises and cuts, but the engines and port wing of the plane were extensively damaged. The occupants of the plane were Pilot A T ORCHARD, Co-pilot A I HADFIELD, with the following passengers: Mrs B J GILCHRIST, Mrs T J HOLLAND, Mr W G FERNIE, and Mr R T SIMPSON, for Christchurch; Miss N FERGUSON, Miss M MUNRO, Mr W STEVENSON, and Mr R SMITH, for Wellington, and Mr G F BOOTH, manager of the Dunedin branch of the Union Steam Ship Company, Ltd., for Auckland. Evening Post, Volume CXXXV, Issue 31, 6 February 1943, Page 4

26 February 1943 - A member of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, Sergeant James Lloyd DENHOLM, 20 years, of Napier, lost his life in an air accident while engaged in flying practice at a North Island station. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 49, 27 February 1943, Page 6

18 March 1943 - When an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force was engaged in night flying from a North Island air station it crashed into the sea at 8.30 p.m. One member of the crew was drowned. He was Pilot-Officer Morris McIntyre BEE, 23 years of Wairoa. The other two occupants Sergeant Derek Aylmer LESLIE, son of Mrs Leslie, of Gisborne, and Aircraftman Alfred Norman LARKMAN, of Wanganui, received injuries classified as not serious. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24537, 20 March 1943, Page 6

30 March 1943 - GALLIE, Rollo William Wesley [Sergeant, Pilot] Killed in air crash overseas. Third son of Mr and Mrs C Gallie of 45 Queen's Avenue, Mount Eden, and brother of Charles, Popsy, Neil, Marcie; aged 24 years. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 79, 3 April 1943, Page 1

06 April 1943 - An airman-pilot under training lost his life in an aircraft accident near a South Island station. He was Leading-Aircraftman John Ross HADLEY, 22 years, son of Mr C J Hadley, Amberley. The aircraft crashed during training in solo flying.

09 April 1943 - An airman pilot under training lost his life in an aircraft accident near a South Island station. He was Leading-Aircraftman Ralph James BROWNLIE, son of Mr J Brownlie, of Wairoa. The fatality occurred when an aircraft crashed during night-flying training. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24555, 10 April 1943, Page 6

17 April 1943 - An aircraft crashed near a South Island air station during dual-flying training instruction, the occupants — Flying Officer Philip Robert Colfox CLARK (Father, Mr B E Clark, Kohimarama, Auckland), and Leading Aircraftman Keith Frederick OUTTRIM (Mother, Mrs E M Outtrim, Wellington) receiving injuries. Flying Officer Clark was admitted to hospital and classified as seriously injured, but the injuries to L.A.C. Outtrim were classified as not serious. Evening Post, Volume CXXXV, Issue 91, 17 April 1943, Page 6

21 April 1943 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force were reported slightly injured when an aircraft from a North Island air station crashed. The personnel involved were Pilot-Officer Maxwell SCANNELL (Father, Dr W G Scannell, 1 Wairarapa Terrace, Christchurch) and Sergeant George Louis VAUGHAN (Father, Mr L B Vaughan, Arapuni Road, Putaruru). Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 94, 21 April 1943, Page 4

01 May 1943 - A member of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost his life in an aircraft accident. He was Sergeant Thomas Victor MARCHANT, 23 years, son of Mr H W Marchant, Wanganui. The plane, in which Sergeant Marchant was the sole occupant, crashed during a flight from a South Island air station [at Wainuiomata]. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 104, 4 May 1943, Page 4 and Evening Post, Volume CXXXV, Issue 132, 5 June 1943, Page 6

06 May 1943 - When an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force crashed on the take-off from a North Island air station two of its occupants lost their lives and two others suffered injuries necessitating their admission to hospital. The personnel involved were:
Killed - Sergeant William Routledge NICHOLLS, 22 years (mother, Mrs S L Nicholls, 38 Dexter Avenue, Mt. Eden, Auckland).
Flight Sergeant Ronald Stanley TRINER, 25 years (wife, Mrs S I Triner, 36 Mewburn Avenue, Mt. Eden, Auckland).
Injured - Flying Officer Bryan Cranstone SCOTT (mother, Mrs L D K Scott, c/o Bank of New Zealand, Nelson), injuries and severe shock.
Flight Sergeant Robert Edward Carson BLACK (mother, Mrs J Black, Waharoa R.D. Matamata), injuries and severe shock. Evening Post, Volume CXXXV, Issue 107, 7 May 1943, Page 3

18 May 1943 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, Pilot Officer Raymond Farmer WILSON, 33 years (wife, Mrs. T. M. Wilson, 7 Ropata Crescent, Lower Hutt, Wellington) and Pilot Officer Charles Verdun Gore RICHARDSON, 27 years (wife, Mrs. M. E. Richardson, c/o Mr. F. Reeves, Wellington Boys' College, Wellington), lost their lives in an aircraft accident near a South Island station, when the aircraft in which they were engaged on an instrument flying practice crashed. Evening Post, Volume CXXXV, Issue 117, 19 May 1943, Page 3

30 May 1943 - IN MEMORIAM
BENNETT, Raymond (Pilot-Officer)- killed on air operations over Germany
ESTCOURT, Kenneth Trevor (Flying-Officer) - killed on air operations
JOHNS, Lionel Fairfax Turner (Flight-Sergeant Navigator) - R.N.Z.A.F 90th Sqdn, only child of Leslie and Edith, killed in an aircraft crash at Shadishall, Suffolk after returning from a succesful raid on Wupperlal, the Ruhr, Germany. New Zealand Herald, Volume 81, Issue 24906, 30 May 1944, Page 1

09 June 1943 - IN MEMORIAM
WALLACE, Rex Donald (Sergeant Air-Gunner), R.N.Z.A.F., killed in an aircraft crash at Scorton, Yorkshire. New Zealand Herald, Volume 81, Issue 24915, 9 June 1944, Page 1

18 June 1943 - An aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force crashed this morning while engaged on Liberty Loan publicity at Whangarei. There were two occupants and both lost their lives. They were:
Flying-Officer Murray Llewellyn GRAY, 25, NOK Mr C Gray, 11 Eltham Road, Kohimarama, Auckland (father)
Pilot-Officer Charles SMITH, 25, Mrs D M Smith, Onerahi (wife). Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 143, 18 June 1943, Page 4 and New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24629, 7 July 1943, Page 2

22 June 1943 - Flight Sergeant Douglas Joseph ASHBY-PECKHAM, 20, of the Royal New Zealand Air Force and son of William George Ashby-Peckham and of Ivy Aileen Ashby-Peckham (nee Davies), of Dargaville, Auckland, New Zealand, was killed. CWGC

15 July 1943 - Three occupants of a Royal New Zealand Air Force machine lost their lives when the aeroplane crashed after taking off from a North Island air station shortly after 5pm. Those killed were:
Squadron-leader Wilfred Maurice Chalk WILLIAMS, D.F.C., 31 years, whose wife resides in Feilding.
Leading-Aircraftman Harold Thomas Joseph BEALE, 34 years, whose wife is Mrs B E Beale, of Mount Eden, Auckland.
Acting Corporal Wilfred Nixon GIBBONS, 22 years, whose father is Mr W W Gibbons, of Parnell, Auckland.
Squadron Leader Williams is a son of the Rev. Canon W. G. Williams, of Napier. Squadron-Leader Williams was serving with the Royal Air Force before the outbreak of war. About the middle of 1939 he was transferred to the Royal New Zealand Air Force for posting to the New Zealand Squadron. He was awarded the D.F.C. in November, 1940. Acting-Corporal Gibbons, aged 21, was the only son of Mr and the late Mrs W W Gibbons, of 7 York Street, Parnell. He joined the Royal New Zealand Air Force about two years ago, and had seen six months service in the South Pacific area. He will be buried at Waikumete Soldiers' Cemetery on Monday morning with full military honours. Leading Aircraftman Beale, aged 34, was the husband of Mrs B K Beale, of 6 Eldon Road, Mount Eden. He was the son of Mr W Beale, of Waikanae. Before enlisting, he was on the staff o£ the N.I.M.U. Insurance Company. He was with the R.N.Z.A.F. in the South Pacific area for over six months. He is survived by his wife and an infant daughter. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 168, 17 July 1943, Page 4

25 July 1943 - A verdict that death was the result of injuries received when he had left a fighter plane by parachute following an accidental collision with another plane was returned today by Mr F K Hunt, coroner, when he concluded the inquest concerning the death of Sergeant-Pilot John Gault DICKIE, aged 23, a member of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, whose mother lives at Waverley. It was disclosed that on Sunday morning, July 25, four fighter aircraft were flying in formation at about 16000 ft when the machine piloted by Sergeant-Pilot Dickie collided with the machine piloted by Flying-Officer J H MILLS. Both pilots baled out, Flying-Officer Mills landing safely. Allan George BAIRD, farmer, of Roberts Road, Pakuranga, said he was working in one of his paddocks at 10.30 on July 25 when he saw two parachutes descending slowly to earth. A man was suspended from each. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 195, 18 August 1943, Page 4

23 August 1943 - Three members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force received slight injuries and were admitted to their station hospital when their aircraft crashed during flying exercises near a South Island station. They were: Leading-Aircraftman Vernon BARTLETT, Auckland; Leading-Aircraftman Ewen Scott BELLISS, Masterton, and Pilot-Officer Stephen Leo CORBETT, Auckland. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 201, 25 August 1943, Page 4

24 August 1943 - The bodies of five R.N.Z.A.F. men, the crew of a Hudson aircraft which crashed into the sea off the mouth of the Rangitikei River were never recovered. At an inquest yesterday afternoon the Coroner (Mr W G L Mellish) found that the deaths of the men
Pilot Officer Harold Hayward BEARD, 29 years
Flight Sergeant William MARSHALL, 31 years
Sergeant Brian Barry McSWEENEY, 20 years
Sergeant John Francis [Frank] AUBREY, 27 years
Sergeant William James PLANT, 30 years
were caused by injuries or drowning as a result of the crash into the sea. Evidence was given that an Air Force Court of Inquiry had found that the Hudson had gone into a spin while engaged in exercises with a Harvard. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVII, Issue 30, 5 February 1944, Page 8

25 August 1943 - Four members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost their lives at a South Island station when two aircraft collided during flying training. The men were:—
Flying-Offlcer Robert Dallas Joseph CAMPBELL, 27 years, husband of Mrs M A Campbell, Mosgiel.
Flying-Officer Frank WAYMOUTH, 34 years, husband of Mrs M Waymouth, Wingatui.
Leading-Aircraftman Brian Eric [Bryan Eric] HALL, 20 years, son of Mr E C Hall, Napier.
Leading-Aircraftman Lewis Howard IRELAND, 21 years, son of Mrs B Ireland, Auckland.
Leading-Aircraftman Lewis Howard Ireland was aged 21. He was the youngest of three sons of Mrs B Ireland, of .]."i St. Virfcent Avenue. Remuera, and was educated at the Remuera school and Seddon Memorial Technical College. He took a prominent part in sport, being a keen footballer and swimmer. Shortly after his 18th birthday he enlisted in the Territorial Force and reached the rank of sergeant. In February, 1941, lie transferred to the R.N.Z.A.F. to train as a pilot. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24673, 27 August 1943, Page 2

31 August 1943 - When an aircraft of the R.N.Z.A.F crashed during flying training from a North Island air station shortly after 9 a.m. the sole occupant, Sergeant Pilot Edwin Noel CORNEY, 20 years, lost his life. His father is Mr W E Corney of Auckland. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 207, 1 September 1943, Page 4

31 August 1943 - In Memoriam - HAUB - In fonf and loving memory of Flight Sergeant Darcy Leslie (Mick) HAUB, NZ Bomber Suadron No 75 missing believed killed on air operations over Germany. A tribute also to his NZ comrades Flight Sergeants Kensington Campbell JACKSON and Eric John ROBERTS. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25295, 31 August 1945, Page 1

13 September 1943 - Two airmen were killed when an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force crashed in the North Island [Waiuku] during training exercises shortly before mid-day. They were
Pilot-Officer William David McJANNET, 32 years, whose wife is Mrs M E McJannet, of Christchurch.
Sergeant Douglas Martin James CAIRNS, 20 years, son of Mrs D B Cairns, of Auckland. The machine was piloted by Pilot-Officer McJannet. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24689, 15 September 1943, Page 4 and Evening Post, Volume CXXXVI, Issue 84, 6 October 1943, Page 4

29 September 1943 - Two aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force crashed during night flying training from a South Island air station. In one machine one. life was lost and two airmen received injuries, and in the second machine the crew of three were killed. The personnel involved were:
Pilot Officer William Raymond BRANT, 23 years (wife, Mrs G J Brant, 128 Rolleston Street, Christchurch)
Pilot Officer Neville George BAILEY, 31 years (father, Mr G H Bailey, 360 Papanui Road, Christchurch)
Pilot Officer Eric Thompson [Eric Thomson] MUNRO, 30 years (wife, Mrs M G Munro, 25 Marlborough Street, Mount Albert, Auckland)
Leading Aircraftman Graham Watson BROWNE, 19 years (mother, Mrs W V Browne, 1 Albert Street, Pukekohe).
Leading Aircraftman Alan Henry BROAD (wife, Mrs A H Broad, Kakanui, via Oamaru), seriously injured.
Pilot Officer Francis Davitt Mandivall MORAN (mother, Mrs W W Moran, 593 Ferguson Street, Palmerston North), slightly injured. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVI, Issue 79, 30 September 1943, Page 6

08 October 1943 - During flying training from a South Island air station a machine crashed and two men were injured. They were: Flying-Officer John Herbert Garland COOKE, of Christchurch and Leading-Aircraftman John Charles McKENZIE, of Kaitaia. Both were seriously injured and admitted to the Christchurch Public Hospital. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 240, 9 October 1943, Page 6

16 October 1943 - When an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force crashed at a South Island aerodrome [near Westport] the pilot was killed. He was Flying-Officer Albert Keith HANCOCK, 30 years, son of Mr S A Hancock, of Hamilton. A passenger in the machine, Mr Dudley WADE, school teacher, of Granity, received injuries and was admitted to hospital. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 247, 18 October 1943, Page 4

21 October 1943 - A Royal New Zealand Air Force pilot, Lieutenant John Llewellyn Rae RICHTER, formerly in the Army, was seriously injured when an aircraft he was flying crashed near a South Island Air Force station. His mother resides in Auckland. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24721, 22 October 1943, Page 2. Died from injuries received 05 December 1943.

23 October 1943 - When a Royal New Zealand Air Force aircraft crashed near a South Island Air Force station the pilot Leading-Aircraftman Kenneth Frank KINGSTON received serious injuries. He was taken to hospital. His wife is Mrs L M Kingston, of Auckland. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24723, 25 October 1943, Page 2

27 October 1943 - When a Royal New Zealand Air Force aircraft from a North Island air force station crashed the sole occupant was killed. He was Flight-Sergeant John Neil SINCLAIR, 23 years, son of Mrs M E Sinclair, Edendale, Southland. The crash occurred during night flying training. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24727, 29 October 1943, Page 2

28 October 1943 - When an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force engaged on dual flying instruction from a South Island air station crashed the pilot lost his life. He was Pilot-Officer Brian Charles LEVET, whose wife is Mrs O Levet, of 14 Ngake Street, Orakei. Pilot-Officer Levet was the son of Mr and Mrs R Levet, of 3 Seaview Terrace, Mount Albert. Aged 24, he was educated at the Gladstone Road and Mount Albert Grammar Schools. He joined the Royal New Zealand Air Force about 18 months ago, and received all his flying training in the Dominion. He was recently posted as an instructor at a South Island station.
An airman under training, Leading-Aircraftman Graham Alexander GUNN, 20 years, son of Mrs R S Gunn, of Darfield, was seriously injured and died of his injuries on 31 October 1943. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 258, 30 October 1943, Page 4

29 October 1943 - Leading Aircraftman, Royal New Zealand Air Force James Glen HENNESSY, aged 28, lost his life in an aircraft accident in Canada. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25345, 29 October 1945, Page 1 and CWGC

01 November 1943 - Two air craft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force collided in midair yesterday near a South Island Air Force station. Each aircraft contained an instructor and an airman pilot under training, all of whom lost their lives. The personnel concerned were:—
Flying-Officer Travis Lester OSBORN, 27 years — Mr T L A Osborn, Hamilton (father).
Leading-Aircraftman Robert Lindsay HULBERT, 19 years —Christchurch.
Pilot-Officer Ralph Keith STRINGER, 26 years — Motueka.
Leading Aircraftman Maxwell BEATTIE, 22 years — Christchurch. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 260, 2 November 1943, Page 4

05 November 1943 - When an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force was reported overdue on a flight from the South Island a search was immediately made and wreckage located on Kapiti Island. A launch with medical officers aboard was immediately dispatched, but on arrival it was found that the two occupants had lost their lives when the aircraft crashed. The personnel concerned were:
Pilot Officer Harold Nevill LONGLEY, 21 years. (Father, Mr A H Longley, People's Palace, Wellington), formerly of Invercargill.
Flight Sergeant Ivan Frederick [Evan Frederick] CUMMINS, 22 years (Father, Mr F W Cummins, Browns Road, Manurewa, Auckland).
ANOTHER FATALITY. Later in the afternoon a training type of aircraft crashed near another South Island training station, the pilot losing his life and the pupil pilot receiving injuries. The pilot was Pilot Officer Hugh EAGLESON, 24 years (wife, Mrs N M Eagleson, Great South Road, Taupiri) and the pupil, Leading Aircraftman Neil Baillie GRANT (mother, Mrs I G M Grant, 33 Pukeora Avenue, Remuera, Auckland). Evening Post, Volume CXXXVI, Issue 111, 6 November 1943, Page 8

11 November 1943 - A gallant effort by Mr M L HOLDEN, of Pouawa, saved the life of Flying Officer Douglas James NILSSON, when an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force hit a building at Pouawa, 15 miles north of Gisborne. The aircraft, which was piloted by Flying Officer Roland Henry BROWNE, caught fire after striking the building, Flying Officer Browne losing his life. Mr. Holden, owner of the property, rushed to the burning aircraft and managed to extricate Flying Officer Nilsson, but in the process received burns which necessitated his admission to hospital. Flying Officer Nilsson (whose wife lives at 495 Aberdeen Road, Gisborne) was admitted to hospital and classified as seriously injured. Flying Officer Browne's wife lives at 104 St. Stephen's Avenue, Parnell. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVI, Issue 117, 13 November 1943, Page 8

18 November 1943 - In Memoriam
GIBBISON - Flight Sergeant Andrew Greenwell GIBBISON, who lost his life in an aircraft crash in Northern Ireland.
HOKSIN - Lieutenant Redge Dennis HOSKIN, R.N.Z.N.V.R. (Fleet Air Arm) who lost his life on 18 November 1943 while on active service.
ROLPH SMITH - Squadron-Leader Malcolm ROLPH-SMITH, D.F.C., R.A.F called to higher service on 18 November 1943 at Lydda, Palestine.
USSHER - Flight Sergeant Wireless Operator Owen Neville USSHER, belived killed on 18 November 1943.
New Zealand Herald, Volume 81, Issue 25054, 18 November 1944, Page 1

24 November 1943 - It is officially stated that the body of Leading Aircraftman Robert Ngaire McCLINTOCK [McLINTOCK], 19 yeas, who was previously reported missing, believed killed, when his plane crashed into the sea during a training flight from a South Island station, has been recovered. His mother is Mrs R V McClintock, of Christchurch. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 281, 26 November 1943, Page 4

01 December 1943 - Sergeant Trefor Llewellyn [Trevor Llewellyn] TYLER, aged 20 years, lost his life when the aircraft he was piloting crashed near a North Island Air Force station. He was engaged on night flying training. Sergeant Tyler's mother, Mrs T L Tyler, lives at Ngakawau, Westport. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVI, Issue 133, 2 December 1943, Page 6

17 December 1943 - When an R.N.Z.A.F aircraft from a South Island station crashed an airman pilot under training, Leading-Aircraftman Ray EMMERSON, 20 years, who was engaged on solo flying training practice, lost his life. His mother is Mrs I Emmerson, of Greymouth. Auckland Star, Volume LXXIV, Issue 300, 18 December 1943, Page 6

19 December 1943 - An aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force crashed near a South Island air station shortly after 5.30 p.m. The two occupants lost their lives. They were:
Woman Aircraftman (first class)[WAAF] Miss Marion Frances YOUNG, 20 years, whose mother is Mrs M F Young, of Taupo.
Sergeant Douglas Haig McDOUGALL [McDOUGAL], 26 years, whose wife is Mrs B E McDougall, of Auckland. The aeroplane was engaged on an exercise flight. New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24772, 21 December 1943, Page 4

01 January 1944 - When an aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force was engaged on a test flight from a North Island air station the sole occupant lost his life. He was Sergeant William Garnet RUSSELL, 20 years, son of Mrs E M Russell, of Feilding. Auckland Star, Volume LXXV, Issue 1, 3 January 1944, Page 4 and Auckland Star, Volume LXXV, Issue 35, 11 February 1944, Page 6

15 February 1944 - In Memoriam - BROUN - A loving tribute to the memory of Ronald Richmond BROUN, killed in an air crash in England, February 15, 1944. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25128, 15 February 1945, Page 1. Flight-Sergeant Pilot Royal New Zealand Air Force Son of Richmond Thomas Broun and of Frances Caroline Broun (nee Boxall); nephew of Mrs. G. G. Conley, of Mount Albert, Auckland, New Zealand. CWGC

21 February 1944 - Two members of the R.N.Z.A.F. lost their lives when an aircraft operating from a North Island station crashed during instrument flying practice. The personnel concerned were: -
Sergeant Alfred Austin CARLESS, 19 years, son of Mr H P Carless, Epsom, Auckland.
Sergeant Albert Leonard BRITTAIN, 22 years, son of Mrs S Brittain, Glen Eden, Auckland. New Zealand Herald, Volume 81, Issue 24824, 22 February 1944, Page 4

22 March 1944 - When two aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force collided during solo flying training at a South Island air station, Leading Aircraftman Andrew Scot DOWNIE lost his life. The pilot of the second machine was not injured. Leading Aircraftman Downie was born at Ormond, near Gisborne. His next-of-kin is his mother, Mrs R G Downie, 39 Oliver Road, Point Chevalier, Auckland. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVII, Issue 70, 23 March 1944, Page 6

21 April 1944 - In Memoriam - FUNNELL - Acting Flight Liutenant John Lucian (Jack) FUNNELL R.A.F. Bomber command, killed in action over Germany. Husband of Doris, father of Jim, Roy and the late Brian and son of Mr and Mrs A G Funnell. Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 94, 21 April 1945, Page 1

22 April 1944 - In Memoriam - HOSKEN - Warrant Officer Trevor Clifford HOSKEN, R.A.F., killed on active service overseas, buried Fossvogur Cemetery, Iceland on ANZAC Day. Also a loving thought to his comrades F.O. John Alec BANKS [R.A.F.V.R], W.O. Kenney Weeks NORFOLK [R.C.A.F.] and W.O. Norman George HICKMOTT [R.N.Z.A.F.] killed in the same crash. Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 94, 21 April 1945, Page 1

05 May 1944 - Pilot Officer John Howard SUMNER, pilot of an R.N.Z.A.F. plane operating from a North Island air station, was killed when his aircraft crashed. His next of kin is his mother, Mrs E W Sumner, 23 Thames Street, Hamilton. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVII, Issue 106, 6 May 1944, Page 8 and New Zealand Herald, Volume 81, Issue 24895, 17 May 1944, Page 4

16 May 1944 - A member of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost his life in an aircraft accident on a landing field at a North Island air station. He was Flying-Officer Walter Robert DE MAUS, aged 24, of Auckland. The son of Mrs C de Maus, of 88 Grafton Road, and the late Mr A W de Maus, Flying-Officer de Maus was born in Auckland and educated at the Kowhai School and Seddon Memorial Technical College. He was formerly on the office staff of a city firm. Before the fall of Singapore he was stationed there with a fighter squadron. He later went to the Dutch East Indies and then returned to New Zealand, where he had been on instructional duties. New Zealand Herald, Volume 81, Issue 24895, 17 May 1944, Page 4

June 1944 - The well-known Tasman shipping service radio operator, Captain R S TAYLOR, formerly of Wanganui, has been killed in an air crash near the islands to the north of Australia. He joined the Post and Telegraph Department at Wanganui and went to Wellington, then to Australia. He was on the Matunga when she was captured during the last war by the German raider Wolff and was taken to Germany, where he spent six months in German prison camps. On his return he accepted a position as chief wireless engineer at Tulagi, in the British Solomon Islands. He was on Tulagi when it was bombed by the Japanese, and he returned to Sydney to transfer to Suva, Fiji. He was appointed to the rank of captain and returned to Guadalcanal where he worked with the Americans. On leave, he flew to Sydney and Brisbane, from where his plane failed to reach its destination. Auckland Star, Volume LXXV, Issue 136, 10 June 1944, Page 4

02 June 1944 - When two fighter aircraft collided near a North Island air station during acrobatic training, Sergeant Gordon Leonard BARNARD lost his life. His father is Mr L C Barnard, Eltham. The pilot of the other machine, Pilot Officer John Barry RILEY, Masterton, made a descent by parachute, escaping with a dislocated shoulder. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVII, Issue 131, 5 June 1944, Page 3

06 June 1944 - While engaged in formation flying from a North Island air station, two aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force came into contact, and the pilot of one lost his life. He was
Sergeant John Aperehama TIRIKATENE, son of the Hon. E T Tirikatene, member of the Executive Council representing the Native Race. Sergeant Tirikatene's machine crashed into power lines. New Zealand Herald, Volume 81, Issue 24913, 7 June 1944, Page 4

20 June 1944 - An aircraft from a South Island air station crashed into the sea, and the occupants, two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, who were on a training flight, are believed to have lost their lives. They were:
Flying Officer Leslie Darcy [Leslie D'Arcy] IRWIN, 26 years (father, Mr. James Irwin, Paeroa).
Corporal Murray Alexander GILLON, 23 years (wife, Mrs G Gillon, Duke's Road, Mosgiel, Dunedin. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVII, Issue 145, 21 June 1944, Page 4

27 June 1944 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force engaged on a flying training flight from a North Island air station yesterday were slightly injured when their aircraft crash landed. They were Flying Officer Keith K J COLEMAN, D.F.M. Mrs J C Coleman, 403 Eastbourne Street, Hastings (w.); and Pilot Officer Kenneth J. URWIN. Mr H J Urwin. c/o Railways Department, Kaikohe, Bay of Islands (f.) Evening Post, Volume CXXXVII, Issue 151, 28 June 1944, Page 6

30 June 1944 - An Air Travel, Ltd. D H Dragon ZK AHT passenger plane, which left Nelson at 1 p.m. on its normal service to the West Coast, crashed on the bush slopes of Mount Hope near Kawatiri. The plane carried six passengers and a pilot. One passenger was killed outright, and another died from injuries. The victims were:
Maurice DAWE, 36 years, Hokitika, secretary of Air Travel, Ltd.
Captain James Cuthbert MERCER, 58 years, Hokitika, managing director of Air Travel, Ltd. died of injuries on the 01 July. Mrs E RUSSELL, Westport, both legs broken, condition serious.
G M STRATHMORE, Wellington, believed fractured skull; condition satisfactory.
Miss A PATTERSON [also recorded as Miss E C PATERSON], matron of the Buller Public Hospital, Westport, broken leg.
Flight Lieutenant Percival Colin LEWIS, the pilot, head, chest, and leg injuries.
Bruce Rainsford PERRY, Wellington, shock, fractured rib; condition satisfactory.
Mr Strathmore is general manager of Macduffs, Ltd., Wellington, and Mr Perry also belongs to that firm. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVIII, Issue 1, 1 July 1944, Page 8 and New Zealand Herald, Volume 81, Issue 25057, 22 November 1944, Page 6

05 July 1944 - A Royal New Zealand Air Force plane, operating from a North Island air station, crashed in the Pohangina Valley and the pilot, Sergeant George BAILLIE, 23 years, lost his life. Sergeant Baillie's next-of-kin is his mother, Mrs W S Baillie, 28a Avenue Road, Timaru. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVIII, Issue 5, 6 July 1944, Page 3

18 July 1944 - Sergeant Robert James STEWART, 20 years, lost his life when the aircraft in which he was engaged in a training flight crashed near a North Island Air Force station. Sergeant Stewart's father is Mr A F Stewart, of Masterton. Auckland Star, Volume LXXV, Issue 169, 19 July 1944, Page 6

18 July 1944 - WIBLIN.—In loving memory ,of our dear son and brother Pilot-Officer Arthur Alan WIBLIN, accidentally killed at Ashburton, July 18, 1944 Till we meet. Inserted by mum, dad, Ethel, Kathleen, Wally and Alb. Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 168, 18 July 1945, Page 1

25 July 1944 - Pilot-Officer Peter Morison DUNCAN, 20 years, lost his life when the aircraft in which he was engaged in a training flight crashed near a North Island Air Force station. Pilot-Officer Duncan's father, Mr J A Duncan, lives at Mission Bay, Auckland. Auckland Star, Volume LXXV, Issue 175, 26 July 1944, Page 6

09 August 1944 - Flying-Officer Gordon Hope GIBBONS son of Mr Hope M Gibbons, of Wellington taking off from a North Island station. He was admitted to hospital and his condition is satisfactory. New Zealand Herald, Volume 81, Issue 24968, 10 August 1944, Page 4

11 August 1944 - Pilot Officer Derek Roy TROLOVE lost his life when the aircraft he was flying crashed near a North Island flying station. His next-of-kin is his wife Mrs O T Trolove, Flat No. 2, 362 Hereford Street, Christchurch. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVIII, Issue 37, 12 August 1944, Page 8

14 August 1944 - Two members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost their lives in an aircraft accident at a South Island air station. The airmen were engaged in solo flying training when their machines collided in midair. They were:
Sergeant Robert Stuart PETTIT (wife, Mrs R S Pettit, Coronation Avenue, North Road, Winton. father, Mr R L Pettit, 10 Brighton Street, Roslyn, Dunedin).
L.A.C. Keith Edwin HODGE (wife, Mrs J M Hodge, 41 Hinemoa Avenue, Devonport, Auckland; mother, Mrs M Hodge, 25 Avon Street, Oamaru). Evening Post, Volume CXXXVIII, Issue 40, 16 August 1944, Page 4

16 August 1944 - In Memoriam - WARBRICK - Sergeant Pilot R.N.Z.A.F Barney Pouheke WARBRICK, tragically killed in an air accident at Waiuku. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25282, 16 August 1945, Page 1

01 September 1944 - Flying Officer Alexander CRUICKSHANK, of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, lost his life when the aircraft he was piloting collided in mid-air with another machine and crashed near a North Island air station. The pilot of the other aircraft landed safely. Flying Officer Cruickshank's father is Mr A Cruickshank, care J W COLQUHOUN, Opahi, Masterton. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVIII, Issue 55, 2 September 1944, Page 8

04 September 1944 - A Royal New Zealand Air Force plane crashed on the slopes of Mount Egmont, two members of the crew losing their lives, and two being injured. They were:
KILLED - Flight Sergeant John Paterson CUMMINS (mother, Mrs S H Cummins, 114 Owen Street, Wellington).
Sergeant Maurice Roy HAYCOCK (wife, Mrs G M Haycock, Brightwater, Nelson).
INJURED - Sergeant Bruce Frederick Aslin ROUGH (mother, Mrs D Rough, 75a Hamilton Road, Hataitai, Wellington), injuries to limbs and shock; admitted to New Plymouth Hospital.
Flight Sergeant Alexander Frederick PETERSON (wife, Mrs A F Peterson, Cambridge House, Devon Street, New Plymouth); admitted to New Plymouth Hospital. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVIII, Issue 58, 6 September 1944, Page 6

04 September 1944 - Pilot Officer Truby Edward DODGSHUN (mother, Mrs C E Dodgshun, 236 Harris Street, Gisborne) was killed instantly at a South Island air station when he walked into the propellor of an aircraft which was taxi-ing, up to, the hangar. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVIII, Issue 64, 13 September 1944, Page 6

22 September 1944 - Flying Officer Philip Robert Colfox CLARK, Auckland, lost his life in an aircraft accident at approximately 9.25 a.m. He was pilot of a fighter aircraft which, while climbing shortly after taking off from Ohakea Air Force Station, was seen to become out of control. The oilot abandoned the aircraft, but height was insufficient to allow the parachute to open. Flying Officer Clark was the son of Mr B E Clark, 272 Kepa Road, Kohimarama, Auckland. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVIII, Issue 73, 23 September 1944, Page 8

03 October 1944 - Overdue on a training flight from Ohakea, a Ventura bomber aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force was later discovered to have crashed near Opunake. All five members of the crew lost their lives. They were:
Flying Officer Jack MARTIN, 26 years. (Wife, Mrs G M Martin, 19 Park Vale Road, Karori, Wellington.)
Sergeant Harold Edwin DAY, 25 years. (Wife, Mrs B A Day, care Plantation Flats, Mount Maunganui, Tauranga.)
Sergeant James Walter Douglas McKAY, 20 years. (Mother, Mrs W McKay, Makarewa, Southland.)
Sergeant Frank William Skottowe WEBB, 19 years. (Mother, Mrs R S Webb, 51 Bayneld Road, Anderson's Bay, Dunedin.)
Sergeant Arnold Thomas HILL, 23 years. (Father Mr F J Hill, McLean Street, Wairoa, Hawke's Bay.)
The Ventura was on a three-hour training flight, and was due back at Ohakea at noon. When it failed to return inquiries were immediately instituted and all reports checked. One report stated that an aircraft had been heard in the Opunake district, and one man stated that he had heard an aircraft crash. When the weather improved an Anson aircraft was dispatched from New Plymouth, and late in the afternoon it located the crashed bomber about 11 miles from Opunake towards Mount Egmont. Flying Officer Martin was 25 years of age and was born at Hokitika. He obtained his secondary education at Nelson College, and joined the R.N.Z.A.F. in August, 1941, being commissioned as a pilot in December, 1942. Sergeant Day was 25 years of age and joined the R.N.Z.A.F. in September, 1943, qualifying as a navigator. He was born in Auckland and attended the Otahuhu Technical High School and the Auckland Training College. Sergeant McKay was 20 years of age and received his secondary education at the Southland Boys' High School. Prior to his enlistment in the R.N.Z.A F he was employed by the Southland Frozen Meat Company. He qualified as an air gunner. Sergeant Webb was 19 years of age and came to the R.N.Z.A.F. from the Air Training Corps, which he joined at Dunedin in 1942. He attended the Otago Boys' High School, and prior to joining the R.N.Z.A.F. was employed by Messrs. Neill and Company, Dunedin. He qualified as an air gunner. Sergeant Hill was born at Wairoa and was 23 years of age. He received his secondary education at the Granity High School, and prior to his enlisted in the R.N.Z.A.F. in October, 1942, was employed by Messrs. Swift and Company, Wairoa. He qualified as a wireless operator-air gunner. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVIII, Issue 83, 5 October 1944, Page 9

05 October 1944 - A member of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost his life near a North Island air station when his aircraft crashed during a training flight. He was Sergeant James Horne McCLAFFERTY, son of Mr J L McClafferty, of Timaru. New Zealand Herald, Volume 81, Issue 25018, 7 October 1944, Page 6

10 October 1944 - The bodies of the two airmen who were drowned when a Walrus amphibian aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force overturned and sank in the harbour were recovered when the wrecked machine was raised from the harbour bottom yesterday. They were:
Flying-Officer John Lillie MARSHALL, of Auckland
Flying-Officer William Leslie MORRISON, of Wellington.
The third occupant of the aircraft, Leading-Aircraftman L E Whitefield, jumped clear before the machine sank. Flying-Officer Marshall was a very experienced pilot, with about 2000 hours flying. At the time of the crash he was engaged on a conversion course before joining the New Zealand Catalina squadron. He joined the Air Force in 1941 and had been retained in New Zealand as an instructor after gaining his wings. Flying-Officer Marshall was born in Auckland 29 years ago and was the only son of Mr W. Marshall, of 46 St. Andrew's Road, Epsom. He was educated at the Auckland Grammar School. He was a well-known member of the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron and had been a member of the crew of the yachts Dorothy and the Windward, among other Auckland boats. His wife died five years ago. New Zealand Herald, Volume 81, Issue 25023, 13 October 1944, Page 4 and New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25116, 1 February 1945, Page 7

26 October 1944 - Four members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force lost their lives when an R.N.Z.A.F. Ventura bomber aircraft on a cross-country flight crashed about four miles north-east of Whenuapai. A fifth member of the crew received serious burns and was removed to station sick quarters at Whenuapai. The men were:
KILLED - Flight Sergeant Edward Thomas BRIGHTWELL, pilot (wife, Mrs A R Brightwell, Turongo Street, Otorohanga).
Flight Sergeant James Alexander PEDERSEN, navigator (mother, Mrs A Pedersen, Mt. Cargill, Dunedin).
Sergeant Russell Trevor ROBBIE, air gunner (mother, Mrs W E Robbie, No. 3 Line, Wanganui)
Sergeant Harold Edwin MAUGER, air gunner (wife, Mrs P L Mauger, 330 Riverlaw Terrace, Christchurch).
INJURED. Flight Sergeant Archibald Malcolm Charles ALEXANDER, wireless operator air gunner (mother, Mrs M H Alexander, 91 Garlands Road, Hillsborough, Christchurch). Condition serious. [Died 28 October 1944 from injuries received.]
Flight Sergeant Brightwell was farming on his own account at Otorohanga before he enlisted in the Army. He joined the R.N.Z.A.F. in January, 1943. He was 29 years of age. His secondary education was obtained at the Palmerston North Boys' High School and the Woodville District High School. He served in the Pacific war theatre. Flight Sergeant Pedersen, who was born in Dunedin in 1923, joined the R.N.Z.A.F. Reserve in August, 1941. He was transferred from the Army to the Air Force in July, 1942, and his training as an observer was completed in Canada. He had completed one tour of duty in the Pacific. In civil life Flight Sergeant Pedersen was a dairy assistant. Sergeant Robbie joined the R.N.Z.A.F. in June 1943, on transfer from the Army. He was 20 years of age, and before entering military service was engaged in farming. His secondary education was obtained at the Wanganui Collegiate School. After home service in the Army, Sergeant Mauger entered the R.N.Z.A.F. in August, 1943, and was trained as an air gunner. He was born in 1917, and was a mechanic by occupation. He was a well-known wrestler and won a South Island bantamweight championship. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVIII, Issue 102, 27 October 1944, Page 6 and Auckland Star, Volume LXXV, Issue 256, 28 October 1944, Page 6

11 November 1944 - One Corsair in a flight of four on a training flight was reported missing. During the flight the Corsairs flew over Westport. The weather was deteriorating when they were recrossing the Southern Alps, and one aircraft went missing from the formation and radio contact could not be made with it. The flight returned to Westport and landed there, as the weather prevented them from continuing a search. Aircraft also stood by at Woodbourne, but they were also unable to proceed because of the weather. Inquiries have been made in the locality where the aircraft went missing, but up to a late hour this morning weather conditions still prevented a search from the air. The pilot of the missing aircraft is Pilot Officer Brian Kenneth BARSTOW, and his father is Mr N C Barstow, 30 Western Road, St. Albans, Christchurch. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVIII, Issue 116, 13 November 1944, Page 6

16 November 1944 - An R.N.Z.A.F. Harvard aircraft from Wigram crashed at Springbank, near Cust, at 2 o'clock while on a dual-flying training flight, the two occupants were killed. They were:
Pilot Officer John Vesey Hamilton ROBINSON, the pilot, whose mother is Mrs. F V Robinson, of Lake Timara, Blenheim.
Leading Aircraftman Leonard John CUNNINGHAM, a pupil under training whose mother is Mrs. J A Cunningham, Hillend Road, Balclutha.
Pilot Officer Robinson was 21 years of age. He was born at Christchurch and educated at the Waihi Preparatory School and Christ's College Christchurch. He was a member of the college first Rugby fifteen in 1940, and a champion swimmer. He also took a prominent part in other sports. He was working on his father's farm at Lake Timara before entering the R.N.Z.A.F. at the beginning of last year to train as a pilot. On the completion of his training he was commissioned and retained in New Zealand as an instructor. Leading Aircraftman Cunningham, who was 19 years old, was educated at South Otago High School and was a porter before he graduated to the R.N.Z.A.F. from the Air Training Corps in August, 1943. Evening Post, Volume CXXXVIII, Issue 120, 17 November 1944, Page 6

21 November 1944 - Severely injured when he made a forced landing in a Corsair near the Air Force station at Ardmore, Flying-Officer Dennis Gordon Allwright RITCHIE, aged 21, single, of Timaru, died in the Auckland Hospital on the 28 November. The aircraft came down about half a mile from the station and caught fire. Auckland Star, Volume LXXV, Issue 282, 28 November 1944, Page 6

24 November 1944 - Sub-Lieutenant (A) Desmond Keith CULPAN, aged 24, has been reported killed in an aircraft crash while on active service. His parents are Mr and Mrs A P Culpan, of 32, Islington Street, Herne Bay, Auckland. Before enlisting Sub-Lieutenant Culpan was employed in the Star's publishing department. He left New Zealand in August, 1941. Educated at the Marist Brothers' School, Vermont Street, and the Auckland Grammar School, he was a keen yachtsman and, was a member of the crew of the B class keeler Tawhiri which sailed from Auckland to Nelson in 1939. Sub-Lieutenant Culpan's younger brother, Flying-Officer Ivan Duke Culpan, is serving with the Royal Air Force in India. Auckland Star, Volume LXXV, Issue 291, 8 December 1944, Page 6

08 January 1945 - The pilot of a Royal New Zealand Air Force fighter aircraft lost his life when a machine in which he was engaged in night flying exercises did not come-out of a diving turn and crashed near Ohakea. He was Sergeant John Rudolph BENSEMANN, aged 20, son of Mr J Bensemann, Upper Moutere, Nelson. Until he entered the Royal New Zealand Air Force in May, 1943, Sergeant Bensemann was engaged m farming in Upper Moutere, Nelson. Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 9, 11 January 1945, Page 3

16 January 1945 - Two sergeant-pilots were killed when the Harvard aircraft they were flying crashed at Ohakea at 2.30 pm. They were
Sergeant Gerald Michael FRIEL, whose mother is Mrs M J Friel, of Waimate.
Sergeant Peter Charles BROWN, whose father is Mr C E Brown, of Wellington. Before the crash occurred the pilots were instrument flying above 2000 ft west of Ohakea. Sergeant Friel was transferred from the Army to the Royal New Zealand Air Force in August, 1943. He was educated at the Waimate High School and St. Bede's College, Christchurch. Sergeant Brown joined the Royal New Zealand Air Force in June, 1943. He received his secondary education at Wellington College. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25103, 17 January 1945, Page 4

13 February 1945 - When a Royal New Zealand Air Force Warhawk aircraft crashed into the side of a hill six miles north of Hunterville the pilot was killed instantaneously. He was Flight Lieutenant Hilliard Ernest BOUCHER, aged 25, son of Mrs K R Boucher, of Epsom, Auckland. The aircraft was being test flown. The cause of the crash is unknown. Flight-Lieutenant Boucher had completed three tours of duty in the Pacific as a fighter pilot. Flight-Lieutenant Boucher was educated at the Auckland Grammar School, where he was a school prefect, a senior gymnasium leader, a member of the senior hockey team and prominent in boxing and shooting contests. Enlisting in the Air Force at the outbreak of war, he was called up in August, 1940. After gaining his wings he was instructing for some time in New Zealand before doing three tours of duty in the Pacific. He took part in over 200 operational sorties and was credited with having shot down one and a-half Zeros. At the time of his death he was stationed at Ohakea. His father, the late Mr E. R. Boucher, who was at one time president of the Auckland Aero Club, was killed while piloting an aeroplane near Wellington on March 17, 1934. He is survived by his mother, one sister and one brother. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25128, 15 February 1945, Page 4

14 February 1945 - As a result of an aircraft crash at Raumai shortly after noon the pilot was killed. He was Sergeant Wilson ALEXANDER, aged 21, of Bay of Islands. Sergeant Alexander was flying a Kittyhawk from the Ohakea station and was engaged in ground firing practice. The aircraft dived to the ground and the pilot was killed instantly. He joined the R.N.Z.A.F. in June, 1943. Before enlistment he was employed on his father's farm at Okaihau. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25128, 15 February 1945, Page 4

03 March 1945 - Flying Officer Alfred Percy FOGERTY died as the result of an accident during a training flight. Although the Corsair aircraft piloted by Flying Officer Fogerty was not flying in company with other aircraft at the time of the mishap, it was observed by other pilots in the vicinity to crash into the sea. The pilot, however, managed to bale out and landed in the sea off Puhinui Waiheke Island. Immediate searches by sea and air were instituted, but no trace of the pilot has so far been found. Flying Officer Fogerty's father is Mr A G Fogerty, of 4 Princes Court, Princes Street, Auckland. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIX, Issue 54, 5 March 1945, Page 6

21 March 1945 - When flying at 2500 feet a Ventura aircraft collided with a Douglas Dakota near Whenuapai and the pilot of the Ventura, who remained with the aircraft, was killed. He was Flight-Lieutenant William John FARNSWORTH, whose wife is Mrs M Farnsworth, of Darfield, North Canterbury. The Dakota had 14 feet broken of one wing, but its pilot, Flight-Lieutenant David Laurence BADE, made a brilliant recovery by safely landing it at Whenuapai. Flight-Lieutenant Farnsworth was killed instantly when the Ventura crashed, but four other members of the crew bailed out and escaped unhurt. They were: Sergeants R N SMITH, navigator (Dunedin), C WELLINGTON, wireless operator (Whangarei), R M HALL, air-gunner (Oamaru), and I E KING, air-gunner (Temuka). As well as the first pilot and the second pilot, Flying-Officer J L ROSS, the Dakota carried two radio experts belonging to the United States Army Air Corps. The Ventura was undertaking range familiarisation practice and the Dakota was undergoing an official radio range test. The cause of the accident is not known and inquiries are proceeding. Flight-Lieutenant Farnsworth's father resides in England. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25158, 22 March 1945, Page 4

21 March 1945 - Two Royal New Zealand Air Force pilots were killed near Ohakea when two Warhawks collided. They were
Pilot-Officer Neville Benton QUIGLEY, aged 21, son of Mrs C C Quigley, Napier.
Sergeant Frank Ernest ROUT, aged 20, son of Mr E Rout, Awapuni. The Warhawks were flying in formation and collided when coming in to land. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25158, 22 March 1945, Page 4

22 March 1945 - Flight Sergeant James DEMPSEY, of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, was killed when the Corsair aircraft in which he was carrying out night-flying training hit the ground at Ihumatao Beach, near Mangere. His mother, Mrs J B Dempsey, lives at St. Andrews, South Canterbury. Flight Sergeant Dempsey, who was in his twenty-first year, enlisted in the R.N.Z.A.F. in 1942. He was an old boy of the Timaru Boys' High School, and before his enlistment was employed at a clerk in the Post and Telegraph Department. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIX, Issue 71, 24 March 1945, Page 8 and New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25161, 26 March 1945, Page 4

15 April 1945 - Two members, of the R.N.Z.A.F. were reported killed as the result of flying accidents, and another was reported missing. Those killed were:—
Flight Sergeant Allan McDougall MORTIMER - Mrs J Mortimer, Brydone, Southland (m.).
Leading Aircraftman Keith Gordon ROBERTSON - Mrs E A Robertson, Thomson Street, Tinwald, Ashburton.
The airman who is missing is Flight Sergeant Clive J [Clyde Joseph] FERRICK - Mrs N E Ferrick, 70 Cambridge Street, Ashburton (w.).[later declared deceased].
Flight Sergeant Mortimer and Flight Sergeant Ferrick were pilots undergoing night flying exercises from Ardmore in the early hours of the morning and failed to return to the station. One crashed aircraft was found on a hillside in the Kaiaua district, near Mangatangi, south of Auckland, but no trace of the other had been found last night. The search for the missing aircraft is continuing. Flight Sergeant Mortimer, who was 22 years old, had undergone training in Canada. He was employed as a tile-maker in Invercargill before he entered the R.N.Z.A.F.
THE OTHER MISHAP. Leading Aircraftman Robertson was flying a Harvard aircraft on a night training exercise on Sunday night when he crashed on the airfield at Wigram. He enlisted in the R.N.Z.A.F. last year, and was 22 years old. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIX, Issue 90, 17 April 1945, Page 7. When the Harvard aircraft he was flying on night training exercise crashed on the airfield at Wigram the pilot was killed. He was Leading-Aircraftman Keith Gordon ROBERTSON, aged 22 years. The deceased enlisted in the Royal New Zealand Air Force last year. His mother is Mrs E A Robertson, Tinwald, Ashburton. Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 90, 17 April 1945, Page 6

23 May 1945 - When a fighter aircraft of the Royal New Zealand Air Force crashed near Craig's farm, about 16 miles from Ohakea the pilot, Warrant-Officer Robert Gordon HOLFORD, was killed. Warrant-Officer Holford recently returned to New Zealand after nearly five years' overseas service. He was 26. His father is Mr G Holford, of Wellington. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25209, 23 May 1945, Page 6

21 June 1945 - Sydney Joseph MEYERS, 67, married, of Pascal Street, Palmerston North, died in hospital from injuries received in a plane mishap at Ohakea. When a Hudson aircraft crashed as it was taking off, Mr Meyers, who was employed by the Public Works Department, was injured on the ground. Two members of the crew were injured. They were Sergeant K A RIGGS, Napier, who suffered moderate to severe burns, and Sergeant I U THORNER, minor burns. Evening Post, Volume CXXXIX, Issue 144, 20 June 1945, Page 8

19 July 1945 - Flying Officer Frank Fordon HILDRETH*, 33 years, of Hastings, New Zealand, was among the 12 persons killed in the Mascot plane crash at Sydney. A Consolidated C-87 Liberator Express operated by the Royal Air Force bound for Manus Island failed to gain altitude after taking off from runway 22, struck trees and crashed into Muddy Creek, north of Brighton. The aircraft exploded on impact, killing all 12 passengers and crew on board. All the victims were service personnel, five from the RAF, one from the Royal New Zealand Air Force and six from the Royal Navy. Hildreth was co-pilot of the Liberator. More than 2000 people attended the funeral of 11 of the men, who were buried in the Rookwood War Cemetery, Sydney. Lieutenant-Colonel F. W. Mothes, New Zealand liaison officer, and representatives of New Zealand organisations in Sydney attended the funeral esterday. Among the wreaths sent were tributes from the High Commissioner for New Zealand, Mr J. G. Barclay, the New Zealand Trade Commissioner, Mr W. Taylor, and the New Zealand war unit. Twelve lives were lost when a Royal Air Force Transport Command plane crashed soon after taking off Mascot aerodrome. The crew of five and seven passengers were killed instantly. The crash was the worst air disaster that has occurred in Sydney. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25261, 23 July 1945, Page 4. * Though the death occurred in Australia it is registered in New Zealand - 1945/62851 Hildreth Frank Fordon 33Y

03 August 1945 - A mid-air collison between aircraft from the R.N.Z.A.F. station at Ohakea occurred. The deceased were:
Flying Officer William Pitt RANGER, aged 21, of Whangarei
Flight Lieutenant Wallace Roy MANSILL, aged 25, of Herne Hay, Auckland. Evidence was given by Flight Lieutenant A A Beer. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25295, 31 August 1945, Page 9

04 August 1945 - A second mid-air collison between aircraft from the R.N.Z.A.F. station at Ohakea occurred. The deceased were:
Sergeant Pilot Warren Selwyn SHARPE, aged 20, of Clevedon Road, Otahuhu
Sergeant Pilot Charles Roderick GRAY, aged 20, of Pongaroa.
Norman Thomas HALL, a trainee at Flock House, Bulls, gave evidence that on August 4 he was working in the fields at the school when he saw two Harvards carrying out exercises. They were diving on each other in turns and he thought the pilots were engaged in gunnery practice. Portions of a tail wing fell in the Flock House area. New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25295, 31 August 1945, Page 9

06 October 1945 - Roll of Honour
AIR FORCE LOSSES - KILLED AND MISSING MEN
The following Air Force casualties are announced, the rank being leading aircraftman unless otherwise stated.
MISSING - BATH, O F - Invercargill, COULSON (Flt. Lieut) W F - Christchurch, FAINE, H - Christchurch, FARR D (Flying -Officer), - Dunedin, FIRMAN G - Waipori Falls, GOSSLING E E (Cpl) - Christchurch, GREENFELL J B - Murchison, HALDANE F G (Cpl) - Dunedin, HOFFEINS J A (Flying Offier) - Wellington, JACOBS J D (Cpl) - Christchurch, KEARNEY F J - Invercargill, KENNEDY C C (Pilot Officer) - Masterton, McARTHUR K (Flying Officer) - Mr A F McArthur, Auckland (father), McPHERSON A A (Flying Officer) - Christchurch, REID D J - Wellington, RUSSELL R B (Flt Sgt) - Christchurch, SAVAGE R G - Christchurch, TAYLOR R J - Mosgiel, THOMAS D S - Dunedin, WILSON M H (Cpl) - Mr A Wilson, Taumarunui (father).
SERIOUSLY ILL - FALVEY, W F (Flt.Lieut.)- Napier, WILSON, J C - Amberley.
KILLED IN ACTION - PREVIOUSLY REPORTED MISSING - BAMFORD, R A (Flying Officer) - Wellington, BUCHANAN J G (Flt Lieut) - Auckland.
PRESUMED DEAD - PREVIOUSLY MISSING, BELIEVED KILLED - BROADBENT, S (Flying Officer) - Dannevirke, HALLETT R E (Flt Sgt) - Hastings, WILLIAMS S S (Flt Lieut) - Taupo), GRAHAM K M (Flying Officer) - Franz Joseph, HOLLOWAY E J (Flying Officer) - Christchurch, MARSHALL L P (Flt Sgt) - Raurimu, MOXSOM M P (Sgt) - Morrinsville, PRIEST E G (Sgt) - Thames, READ D D (Sgt) - Kohukohu, SCOTT R J (Flying Officer) - Dunedin, SINGER R M (Flt Lieut) - Australia.
PREVIOUSLY REPORTED MISSING - COPLAND J R (Acting Flying Officer) - Pukerau, ELLIOTT T I (Flying Officer) - Te Kuiti, JONES K W (Flying Officer) - Lower Hutt, LAMBERT M (Pilot Officer) - Wellington, LONGLEY G E (Flt Sgt) - Christchurch, MARTYN L A (Pilot Officer) - Greymouth, PHILLIPS A J (W.O) - Waitoitoi, SANDMAN D A (Flying Officer) - Greymouth, SHUTT S C (Flt Sgt) - Christchurch, WARD J (Acting Flt Lieut) - Heriot, YOUNG R A (Sgt) - Whangarei.
MISSING, BELIEVED KILLED - PREVIOUSLY REPORTED MISSING - STUCHBERY L R (Flt. Lieut) — Nelson
New Zealand Herald, Volume 82, Issue 25326, 6 October 1945, Page 8

07 October 1945 - Three Tuis [Royal New Zealand Women's Army Auxiliary Corps] are reported to have been killed when a Stirling en route to Britain from Cairo crashed at Rennes, in western France. They were:
814774 Sergeant Miss Marie Elise Isabel INNES, 26, Daughter of Lt.-Col. Vincent James Innes and Muriel Annie Innes, of Karori, Wellington, New Zealand.
818051 Private
Miss Margaret Jean MORTLOCK, 24, Daughter of Robert and Margaret Muriel Jane Mortlock, of Hawera, Taranaki, New Zealand.
822452 Private Miss Margery GREENFIELD, 31, Daughter of Albert Percy and Mary Lawer Greenfield, of Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand.
It is understood that they were coming to London to work at the Fernleaf Club. Reuters Paris correspondent stated that all 26 occupants of the aircraft were killed. Evening Post, Volume CXL, Issue 87, 10 October 1945, Page 8 and CWGC

DAKOTA CRASH NEAR PORT UNDERWOOD - On 09 August 1948 a Dakota freighter ZK-AZOE Parera, flying from Blenheim to Paraparaumu hit the hills near Rununder Point on the seaward side Port Underwood, and burst into flame. The news was passed to the Perano whaling station in Tory Channel, and five whalers set off in a whalechaser accompanied by the mothership Tuatea. A search party went ashore at Fighting Bay and took about half an hour to climb the slope of the ridge. At the same time Len BIDDIS from Hakana went on horseback and foot to the scene, complete with first aid equipment, but it was clear there were no survivors. The fusilage of the place was burnt out but the tail assembly and wings were still intact. The Perano team returned to radio the news to Wellington.
The crew Commander Murdo Campbell MacLEOD, 40 years, and Commander Richard James Robert Haldane (Dicky) MAKGILL, 41 years, were killed on impact. Their bodies were taken to Blenheim early the next morning by a police party after a difficult trek in the dark over steep country. They found parts of the fusilage still burning. Port Underwood settlers were asked to help bring out any salvageable cargo.
The DC3 had orginally beloinged to 41 Squadron of the Air Force at Whenuapai, and had been transferred to NAC (National Airways Corporation) the previous year for use as a freighter. This was NAC's first fatal air crash. Apparently some wreckage still remains on Scraggy Ridge. From - The Seaport Scene - the voice of Picton and the Marlborough Sounds Issue 368 24 October 2014.

On the 19 February 1958, 32 year old David BALLARD was killed when ZK-BDP, a Percival EP.9 crashed near Rangiwahia. He was delivering hut materials in the Kaweka Range and the BALLARD HUT is named for him.


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