NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR ONE
OTAGO WITNESS 08 SEPTEMBER 1915
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

CAPTAIN DOMIGAN.
Captain W. DOMIGAN, who is reported wounded, is one of the best-known Territorial officers in the Southland district. For many years he was one of the leading shots. He joined the Gore Rifles in 1883, and two years later he removed to Balclutha and joined the Clutha Rifles. He rejoined the Gore Rifles in 1893 as a private, but was shortly afterwards elected lieutenant, and was gazetted captain in 1903. In addition to being a prominent local marksman, he finished up third for the championship of the dominion in 1903 and was chosen as one of New Zealand’s representatives in the Bisley team of 1904. He is a native of Invercargill.

LIEUTENANTS.
Lieutenant Cedric Rolfe SARGOOD, reported killed and missing about August 9, is the son of Mr P. R. Sargood. He became connected with the Territorial Force on June 1, 1911, when he joined the Senior Cadets at Roslyn. He was previously connected with the Wanganui College Cadets. Taking his work seriously, he studied for a commission, and passed his examination for second lieutenant on 25th March, 1912, and for first lieutenant on 9th October, 1914. He was lieutenant of D Company, Otago Infantry, when he enlisted for active service on September 21. 1914. He left for the front with the Third Reinforcements Otago Infantry Battalion, for Egypt, and arrived at the Dardanelles early in May. He was invalided back to Egypt on May 30, but returned to the front after three weeks in hospital, when he gave up his, life for King and country.
Lieutenant A. D. JACK, wounded, of the Auckland Infantry Battalion, is the son of Mr N. P. Jack, Henderson; nephew of Mr D. W. Jack, Mayor of Whangarei. He was born at Maimu, Whangarei, and is 24 years of age. He was educated at Maungataporo and Whangarei High School, and followed farming at Maungatapere and at Maungaturoto, where he was lieutenant in charge of Senior Cadets. He was for some time member of Marsden Mounted Rifles, and was in Auckland, passing first lieutenancy examination, when the war broke out, and volunteered at once, but, being on the unattached list, was passed over until the Fifth Reinforcements.
Lieutenant CRAMPTON is the son of Mr J. B. Crampton, Waiau, Canterbury. Six years ago he went to Fiji, holding a commission in the Fijian Defence Force. Resigning this position, he returned to New Zealand and joined the New Zealand Defence Staff on May 1, 1912, being appointed signalling instructor to Canterbury district. He is on the Headquarters Staff of the Canterbury Infantry Regiment, and when war broke out left with the Main Expeditionary Force.
Lieutenant Arthur George ALDRIDGE, who is reported to have been wounded at the Dardanelles on August 8, is the oldest son of the late Mr T. A. Aldridge, who was formerly stationmaster at Frankton, and is 30 years of age. He was educated at the Southland High School. For some years he was a member of the staff of the district railway traffic manager’s office, Auckland, and he was also an officer in the Railway Engineers. He left for the front with the infantry of the Fourth Reinforcements. Lieutenant Aldridge has been in the firing line since the beginning of June, and in the last letter received from him by his relatives he stated that he and his platoon had be drafted to the 6th Hauraki Regiment. His wife resides in Remuera, and his mother lives at Epsom.
Lieutenant Cuthbert William FREE, age 22, is the eldest son of S. L. P. Free, Lower Riccarton, Christchurch. He was educated at Reefton, Robin Hood Bay, and Christ’s College. At the latter school he took a great interest in the Cadet Corps, and was a member of the shooting eight, and for two consecutive years led the winning Snow Shield team. On leaving school he was articled to Mr T. W. Stringer (now Mr Justice Stringer), and attended lectures at Canterbury College, where he passed some of the examinations preliminary to obtaining the LL.B. degree. While still at school he qualified for and obtained an infantry commission, which he subsequently resigned on being offered a commission as second lieutenant in the C.Y.O. Immediately war broke out he volunteered for active service, and joined the Canterbury Mounted Rifles, forming part of the Main Expeditionary Force. Always a keen footballer, he played for his school, and later for Canterbury College. While in Egypt ho was promoted to be first lieutenant. Leaving with the first of his regiment which volunteered to go as infantry to the Dardanelles, he is now reported to be in hospital at Alexandria with a severe bayonet wound.
Lieutenant Eric Buckingham ALLEY (Otago Mounted Rifles, wounded) is the eldest son of Mr F. J. Alley, head master of the Wharenui School, Christchurch. He is 22 years of age, and was educated at the Amberley District High School, the West Christchurch School, the Christchurch Boys’ High School, and Canterbury College. On leaving college he took up farming in Southland, and was for three years a lieutenant in the Southland Mounted Regiment. He left with the Main Expeditionary Force, and was in the trenches for two months.
Lieutenant W. DEANS, wounded in the ankle at the Dardanelles, is a son of the late John Deans, of Riccarton, and is 25 years of age. He was educated at the Christchurch Boys’ High School, and on leaving school took up part of the Homebush Estate, near Waddington. He was enthusiastic with regard to military matters, and held a commission in the C.Y.C. before leaving with the Main Expeditionary Force. He is a keen sportsman, being a member of the Old Boys’ Football Club, and secretary of the Christchurch Hunt Club.
Lieutenant Francis DAVISON, killed in action at the Dardanelles on August 7, 1915 was officer commanding the machine gun section of the Canterbury Mounted Rifles with the Main Body of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. He was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs J. H. Davison, of St. Leonards, Culverden, and well known in the district for his keenness and ability in military matters and in all forms of sport. He was educated at Christ’s College, Christchurch, and was a College Cadet before joining the Canterbury Yeomanry Cavalry, receiving a commission as second lieutenant when the Territorial system was inaugurated. Three years ago he was appointed officer commanding the machine gun section of the 1st Mounted Rifles (C.Y.C.), which he brought to a very high standard of efficiency. His section was never beaten in any competition with the gun either here or in Egypt, where he was frequently complimented by those in authority on the excellent work accomplished. With his two brothers. Lieutenant Davison was one of the first to volunteer when war was declared, and left with the Main Expeditionary Force. He was a keen footballer and a prominent polo plover. For some year's he managed his father’s station before taking up his residence on his own land at Lowry Peaks. He married Alice, elder daughter of Mr and Mrs. Herbert RAWSON, of Wellington and Seatoun, whom he leaves a widow with two little sons, one an infant only a few weeks old.

SERGEANT-MAJOR.
On Saturday evening Mr J. C. CUFF, of Papakaio, received intimation that his son Sergeant-major Nugent Jerome CUFF had been killed in action at the Dardanelles on August 7. Sergeant-major Cuff was born at Gore 27 years ago. He went to North Otago with his parents as a young man, and received his education at the Ngapara and Waitaki Boys’ High School. He was amongst the first of the dominion instructors appointed under the Territorial system, having charge of the Duntroon district, and was afterwards stationed at Alexandra. In this capacity he was eminently successful. He resigned from the Defence Forces, having accepted a more lucrative position as manager of the Sunnyside Station, Southland, a position he held at the time of his enlistment. He left with the Main Expeditionary Force as a member of the Otago Mounteds, having been raised to his former status of sergeant-major. The deceased was an intrepid horseman, and as a bareback rider earned distinction at the agricultural shows throughout the island.

SERGEANTS.
Sergeant Harvey JOHNS, wounded on August 7 or 8, is a son of Mr F. Johns, Beach road, Ashburton. He was born at Waimate, and educated at the Hampstead School, Ashburton. He left with the Main Body, Wellington Infantry Battalion. Sergeant John is 25 years of age.
Sergeant Malcolm BLAIKIE was born in Weatherstones. He was educated at Mount Stuart School, and joined the Tuapeka Mounted Rifles at the age of 17, and was one of the first in Tuapeka to volunteer when war broke out. He has two brothers in the Liverpool’s Own. Their great grandfather, Mr W. Blaikie, fought at Waterloo under Wellington.
Sergeant Guy Fyans C. BRIDGEMAN, of the Fifth Otago Mounted Rifles, reported wounded at the Dardanelles on August 10, and dangerously ill at Malta on the 21st idem, is the third son of Mr F. O. Bridgeman, of this city. He is 23 years of age and was educated at the George Street School and Selwyn Collegiate School. Before the war he was engaged in sheep farming, and has been in the Otago Mounted Rifles for some years. He was one of the first to volunteer for active service, and left New Zealand with the Main Body of the Expeditionary Force. He was promoted to corporal whilst in camp at Tahuna Park, and to sergeant on the voyage to Egypt. Sergeant Bridgeman was reported as having distinguished himself by his coolness under fire when in charge of his troop in some outpost engagements.
Sergeant Thomas Harris FRASER left Christchurch with the Main Expeditionary Force. He was educated at the Caversham Public School, and from there he went to Selwyn College for two years. Deciding to be a chemist, he served his time with Mr Waters, of Princes street. He had just been promoted to a position in the Friendly Society’s Dispensary in Oamaru when the news of the war was announced. He at once enlisted, came to Dunedin, and joined the Otago Field Ambulance Corps at Tahuna Park. He was afterwards transferred to the camp at Addington, Christchurch, and there he held the position of sergeant-dispenser in the Mounted Men’s Hospital. He was also attached to the Headquarters Staff. He was attached to the First Division of the Canterbury Mounted Battalion, and with them left the Zeitun Camp, Egypt, for the Peninsula on May 8. He was invalided back to the Point Koubba Hospital, Cairo, on July 7 suffering from a nervous breakdown and tonsilitis. He could only have returned to the Peninsula again, where he is reported wounded.
Sergeant R. F. R. WALPOLE, Fifth Reinforcements, Wellington Infantry (wounded), was born at Derby, England, on October 6, 1892. Whilst still young he went to live at Leicester, England, where he was educated. When 14 he came to New Zealand, and learned the building trade in Wanganui. He is very fond of music, and his choice fell on the cello, which instrument he loved. Apart from being a good son and loving brother, he was a warm-hearted, genial friend, much respected and loved by all with whom he came in contact.
Sergeant Robert NAIRN, who left Auckland for the front with the Fourth Reinforcements, and who has been killed in action, was 24 years of age. For some time prior to enlisting he was engaged in farming near Auckland. He spent most of his life in Auckland. For many years he identified himself with St. Paul’s Church, and was one of its principal-officers, and superintendent of the Sunday school. He was greatly respected by those who knew him.
Lance-sergeant David SUTHERLAND, reported killed in action at the Dardanelles on August 6 or 7, was 24 years of age, and the younger son of Mr David Sutherland, East Taieri. He was educated at East Taieri School, and afterwards followed farming pursuits. He was a member of the East Taieri Presbyterian Church and Bible class.
Sergeant William Stewart RAE (reported shot in the arm) is the third son of Mr Robert Rae, 3 Hawthorn terrace, Mornington. He was born at Kensington, and educated at the High Street and Otago High School. He took an interest in aquatics and gymnastics, and was captain of the Old Boys’ Football Club at the time of his joining the Field Engineers. He was a surveyor in the employ of Messrs N. and E. S. Paterson.

CORPORALS.
Corporal J. R. H. BURROWS was educated at the Allanton School, and was 30 years of ago. He was one of the first to enlist from Balclutha with the Main Body, and was engaged as one of the stretcher-bearers at the front.
Corporal AULD left with the Second Reinforcements as a private, and was afterwards raised to the position of corporal. He was wounded between August 9 and 15, and admitted to the Fifteenth General Hospital, Alexandria, on August 15.
Corporal William Horace JAMES, wounded on August 8 or 9, and admitted about that time to the Hospital Ship Neuralie, was, prior to his joining the Fourth Reinforcements, associated with his father (the general secretary of the New Zealand Political Reform League) in journalistic and office work. A great admirer of the hero of Mafeking, he took enthusiastically to the Scout movement, and formed what was actually the first Scout Patrol in New Zealand with seven of his chums at Ponsonby, Auckland, prior to the movement taking practical shape in New Zealand. Six out of the seven boys associated with him in that patrol are either serving or have served at the front.
Acting-corporal Godfrey Clive MILLER, wounded in the arm, is the son of the manager of the Bank of Australasia, Dunedin, and grandson of the Hon. John Duthie, Wellington. He was a sergeant in the Divisional Signal Company, Second Reinforcements, and surrendered his rank on joining the Main Body at the Dardanelles, but has apparently been promoted again. He was born at Wellington and educated at Hawera State School, Mr Stace's private school, Robin Hood Bay (Marlborough), College Street and Boys’ High School (Palmerston North), and Otago Boys’ High School. For the two years before enlisting he was apprentice architect with Messrs Salmond and Vanes, Dunedin.
Lance-corporal R. H. LIVINGSTONE (wounded), is a son of Mr Thomas Livingstone, Durham street. Christchurch. As a youth he was a pupil at the High Street School, Dunedin, and for several years has been a law student at Canterbury College, Christchurch. He was secretary and treasurer of the Canterbury College Football Club, and a clever five-eighth in the team. With other Canterbury College students he joined the Canterbury Infantry Battalion, and was wounded at the opening landing at the Dardanelles. After seven weeks in hospital, he rejoined his company, and is reported wounded a second time. He has an elder brother at present at the front, and a younger brother in training at Trentham, while another brother is an adjutant in the Defence Office, Christchurch.
Lance-corporal Edward CORBETT, Wellington Infantry Battalion, wounded on August 8, was a member of the Gisborne Territorial Force when he enlisted with the Main Body. He went away as a private, and was subsequently given the rank of lance-corporal. Lance-corporal Corbett was a member of the C Company squad, which did such successful work at the Auckland competitions. He was also a prominent footballer and a member of the Poverty Bay Rowing Club, and a representative of the crew that won the L.V.A. shield in 1914.
Lance-corporal James A. McLEOD, reported wounded, was born in Dunedin in 1894. He attended the Kensington School, where he played football during the two years that they were premiers. He afterwards joined the Southern Club, beginning in the Fifth Grade, and playing last year in the Southern Second and First Grade teams. He played last year in the junior representative team. He also won the welterweight competition at a recent boxing tournament. At the time of joining the Fifth Reinforcements he was employed on the permanent staff of the Central Battery, St. Kilda.
Mr R. G. Baxter, of Maori Hill, has received word that his son Lance-corporal Norman BAXTER, who was first reported dead “cause unknown,” was killed in action at the Dardanelles on August 6 or 7. Lance-corporal Baxter was in the service of the National Mortgage and Agency Company before he left on service, and was well-known in local athletic circles. He was a member of the Pirates Football Club, of the Cosy Dell Tennis Club, and the Carisbrook Cricket Club, and had an interest with several others in a yacht at Broad Bay. On the outbreak of war he was one of the earliest to enlist, and was one of the six mounted men who went into the first camp at Forbury. He left with the main body in the Fifth (Otago) Mounted Rifles, and was one of General Godley’s body guard. Lance-corporal Baxter had been between three and four months in the trenches at the Dardanelles when he met his death.

PRIVATES.
The death is announced at the Dardanelles of William Charles FALCONER, of Motueka, who had the honour of picking up the signal and sending out the message which led to the destruction of the Emden on Cocos Island. He was a son of Mr Luke Falconer, at present owner of Rotherfield Orchard, Riwaka, Nelson, but formerly of Warepa, Clutha County. The late William Falconer was born at Norsewood, Hawke’s Bay, on September 24, 1894, and was educated at Napier and Wairoa. He entered the Post and Telegraph Office at Wairoa, where he learnt telegraphy, and was at Eltham when the war broke out. He joined the Taranaki section of the Wellington Battalion, and was employed on the wireless telegraph on the transport Arawa, when he picked up the S.O.S. signal from Cocos Island, and gave the alarm by which H.M.A.S. Sydney was enabled to pursue and destroy the notorious Emden. For this he was congratulated by his colonel.
Private William DAVIDSON who is reported wounded for the second time, is a son of the late James Davidson, of Stafford, and a brother of Mrs J. Stephens, of Cobden. He went away with the Main Expeditionary Force, and was wounded in the arm on May 3, and again in the head on August 8.
Private David McCrorie COOK, who was killed in action on August 7, was the fifth son of the late Robert Cook, and was 32 years of age. He was born at Mornington, and educated at the Mornington School. An ironmoulder by trade, head served his apprenticeship with J. Sparrow and Sons, and enlisted with the Third Reinforcements. He was a keen volunteer (a member of the Wakari Rifles until disbanded), and a first-class rifle shot. He was also intimately connected with the sporting clubs of Mornington.
Private CODLING was working in the North Island when the war broke out. He then came to Christchurch and enlisted in the Main Expeditionary Force. He was well known in Australia as a cycle road racer. He was previously wounded, and returned to the firing line, and was killed.
Private W. P. STEPHENS, now in the No. 8 Australian General Hospital, Ghezireh, Cairo, with a wounded knee received at the Dardanelles, is the eldest son of Mrs W. Stephens, Rimu. He enlisted in Hokitika and left with the Fifth Reinforcements, Canterbury Battalion.
Trooper Patrick O’CONNOR was born in Appleby, Nelson. He is the son of the late John and of Mrs O’Connor, and for some years was in the Permanent Artillery, Wellington. Later he took up land in Braeburn, Murchison, and from there joined the Second Reinforcements.
Private Gordon Robert MARSHALL, wounded at the Dardanelles, is the third son of Charles Marshall, of Dannevirke. He was a representative player for the East Coast Football Club, and was born at Little Akaloa, Banks Peninsula. Of later years he resided in Dannevirke and also in the Pongaroa district.
Private Peter McLACHLAN, reported wounded, is the second son of Mr and Mrs P. McLachlan, Strathlachlan, Argyllshire. He left with the Third Reinforcements, and was employed on dredge 222 prior to joining the colours.
Private John MIDDLEMISS, wounded, is the fifth son of Mr Thomas Middlemiss, Maitland. He is 23 years of age and 6ft 2in high, and was born and brought up at Greenvale. He joined the Fifth Reinforcements at the Bluff.
Trooper Andrew John AITKEN, who left with the Main Body of the Expeditionary Force, is the eldest son of Robert Aitken, Opihi. He was educated at Kakahu School and Timaru High School. He was engaged in general farm work, and later in contracting. When war was declared he volunteered, leaving his business to be wound up after he left.
Signaller William Henry POTTER, headquarters staff, Third Auckland Mounted Rifles, who left with the Main Expeditionary Force, was born at Avondale in 1895, and is a son of Major Potter, chairman of the Avondale Road Board. He was a member of the Avondale Boy Scouts, and took part in all athletic sports. At the age of 18 he joined the A Squadron Auckland Mounted Rifles, of which his father had command. At the outbreak of war he, with his elder brother, John, volunteered, and both were accepted for active service. A younger brother is now at Trentham, having just graduated from the Royal Military College, Duntroon. He leaves with the Eighth Reinforcements as first lieutenant.
Private Charles HERBERT (Canterbury Infantry), who was wounded on August 7 or 8, is 26 years of age. He is a son of Mr A. Herbert, Heriot, and was horn at Heriot and educated at the Heriot Public School. He was in the Public Works employ at Westland when war broke out, and joined the Main Body.
Private G. CAMPBELL (wounded) is a son of Mr W. R. Campbell, Invercargill. He is 20 years of age.
Private J. CONNOR, wounded at Gallipoli, is a son of Mr Thomas Connor, of Arrow. He is 27 years of ago, and was one of the first in the district to volunteer for active service. Private Connor was attached to the Otago Battalion, and left for Egypt with the Main Body. He was an enthusiastic member of the Football Club, and was very popular with all who knew him. His many friends in this district will extend their best wishes for his speedy recovery.
Trooper Robert WREAKS, Canterbury Mounted Rifles, second son of Mr T. Wreaks, grain merchant, Christchurch, was wounded in the back on August 8. Trooper Wreaks, who is 22 years old, was born in Christchurch and educated at Christ’s College, where he was a lieutenant in the College Cadets. He proved himself to be a good, all-round athlete, was in the first Rugby Fifteen, a member of the shooting, team, and a good gymnast. When war broke out he was a lance-corporal in the C.T.C., and was in the first draft of the first contingent to go into camp. His brother is also at the Dardanelles.
Private Norman Allan William BEAGLEY, recently reported wounded in the head, is the only son of Mr and Mrs F. Beagley, of Kilbirnie, Wellington. He was born at Wellington 22 years ago and prior to enlisting was farming in the Rangitikei district. Joining the Main Expeditionary Force, he left last October, and has been fighting at the Dardanelles since the landing of the New Zealand Forces. Latest advice received states that he is aboard the Hospital Ship Dongola.
Private F. J. FOUGERE wounded at the Dardanelles, is a son of Mr G. W. Fougere, farmer, Tarata, Taranaki. He was one of the first to volunteer, and has been at the Dardanelles operations since the first landing.
Trooper James Philip GUY reported wounded, is the eldest son of Mrs A. Guy and the late Mr John Guy, S.M., New Zealand Railways, and left with the Main Body. He took a keen interest in sport of all kinds, representing the Otago hockey team two years in succession. He was also secretary for the Balmacewen Tennis Club for two seasons. Douglas, the second son, is also at the Dardanelles, having left with the Fourth Reinforcements.
Private Robert GRAY, reported wounded, was born in Albany street, Dunedin, and educated in the Albany Street School. He is 20 years of age, and was working at Roxburgh at the time of his enlisting with the First Contingent to Egypt.
Sapper Charles A. LIVINGSTON (wounded) received his early education at the Arthur Street School, and from there he went to the Boys' High School. Choosing engineering as his vocation, he went to Messrs Wilson and Wilson, where he learned the practical part. He afterwards went to the University to prosecute his studies, and while there the war broke out. He joined the Main Body.
Trooper Arthur BLACK, who was wounded in the left leg left Timaru with the Main Expeditionary Force. He is the youngest son of Mr Frank Black, and was born at Green street, Ashburton.
Private Albert FRANKLIN, reported wounded in the forearm on August 9, is the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Ford Franklin, Havelock North, Hawke’s Bay. He is 20 years of age, and left with the Fourth Reinforcements in the Otago Battalion.
Driver Albert HALL, recently reported wounded, is the youngest son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Hall, Oxford terrace, Christchurch, of which city he is a native. When a boy at East Christchurch' School he was a most enthusiastic member of the Queen’s Cadets. Subsequently he entered the well-known E Battery, and joined the Field Artillery Brigade of the Main Body of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. For many years Driver Hall was an active member of the Union Rowing Club, first as coxswain and then as oarsman.
Private Harry Moffit FIELDER, wounded at the Dardanelles, is 21 years of age. He left with the Third Reinforcements, and was employed by the Gisborne Harbour Board prior to enlisting.
Private Thomas ROSS, Twelfth Nelson Regiment, wounded,in the thigh and leg, is the third son of Mr James Ross, Clyde street, Dunedin. He was born in Melbourne in 1890, and came to Dunedin when he was four years old. He was educated at the Albany Street School, and at the time of enlisting was in the employ of the Public Works Department. With his younger brother, he left with the Main Body, and took part in the engagement on the Suez Canal and in the trenches in the Dardanelles, where he received his wounds.
Private P. O’CONNOR was reported missing about the beginning of June, but about August 12 was reported to be wounded in the forearm, he was among the first who volunteered from Gore.
Private Edward BREACH, who was wounded on August 8 or 9, was born at Rakaia 21 years ago. He was educated at the Ashburton High School, and afterwards served two years on the N.Z.T.S. Amokura. He joined the Fourth Reinforcements at Wellington.
Private Peter BIGGAR killed at the Dardanelles on August 7, was the son of old residents of the Kaikorai, his father having been in the employ of the Provincial Government of Otago. He was born in the Kaikorai, and educated at Kaikorai and Mornington Schools. He was on a holiday in Nelson when he enlisted and joined the Canterbury Battalion, but afterwards transferred into the Otago Infantry Battalion. He left with the Fourth Reinforcements, and has several nephews on active service.
Arthur Frank WETHEY, wounded, youngest son of the Rev. E. B. Wethey, of Portobello, was born at Opawa, Christchurch, on March 10, 1889. He was educated at Tapanui and the Christchurch Boys’ High School. He studied dentistry in Christchurch, but relinquished it for an outdoor life, and was engaged on the Hukarere sheep run, in Otago, when war was declared. He at once determined to support his King and country, and was enrolled in the South Otago Infantry Regiment early in August, 1914, and left with the Main Body. He was a member of the Tapanui Rifle Club.
Private George M'GONIGAL, Otago Infantry, killed, was the youngest son of the late Mr J. M'Gonigal, an old resident of Caversham. He was 28 years of ago on the day of his death. He was educated at the Caversham Public School, and afterwards took up photography as his profession. He was 11 years with Messrs Muir and Moodie, photographers, Dunedin, and latterly with Mr C. Armstrong, of George street. He left with the Fourth Reinforcements.
Private A. P. CLARKE, killed in action at the Dardanelles on August 7, was born at Waikaia, Southland, 20 years ago, and received the usual primary school education. He took a keen interest in volunteering, and joined the Territorials on the inception of that system. He joined the Expeditionary Forces when he reached his twentieth year, and sailed with the Fourth Reinforcements. He was in Egypt during the last week of July, so must have met his death during the first week at the front.
Sapper Harold Wesley CAMPBELL, who was wounded on August 8, is 20 years of age. He is an Otago boy, and was educated at the Lawrence District High School. Before enlisting at Timaru, where his parents reside, he worked on the New Zealand railways at Dunedin.
Gunner T. W. SCOTT, Second Battery New Zealand Field Artillery, reported wounded, is the eldest son of Mr T. W. Scott, 6 Broughton street, Kensington. He left with the Main Body, and was at the landing at the Dardanelles. He was born in Dunedin, and educated at the Forbury School. He was a member of the Caversham Fire Brigade for a long term, but latterly he shifted to Wellington. He was one of the first to volunteer for service. His brother Private C. E. Scott, has been missing since the landing.
Private H. W. GRIFFITH, of the North Otago Infantry, wounded, left 12 months ago as a private, and has since been promoted to corporal.
Private Thomas Pycroft ROWLATT is the youngest son of Mr G. F. Rowlatt, barrister and solicitor, and was born at Naseby, Otago, in February 1882. He was educated at the High Street School, Dunedin, and afterwards was employed in various commercial pursuits in Dunedin. Of late years he has been assisting his brother-in-law. Mr B. K. Bennett, of Bucklands, Awahuri, Manawatu, in the working of his farm. He came to Dunedin in November, 1914 and enlisted in the Third Reinforcements of the Fourth Regiment of Otago Infantry, and sailed for Egypt on the 10th February last.
Private George Patrick MORRISSEY, who was reported wounded on August 10, is a grandson of Mrs GRIDGEMAN, of Hindon, Central Otago. Prior to enlisting he was in the employ of the Railway Department as fireman, and was stationed at Westport. He has a younger brother wounded, who is being invalided home. Private Morrissey left with the Second Canterbury Reinforcements. He is 21 years of age.
Trooper Ralph WAGORN who was wounded on August 7, and admitted to the hospital ship Delta, is 21 years of age, and a twin brother of Guard Wagorn, also at the front. He was educated at Little Akaloa School, and left with the Main Expeditionary Force.
Trooper R. J. FROST, who has been wounded in the shoulder, is 21 years of age. He is the third son of the late Mr Michael Frost, of Studholme Junction. Prior to leaving for the front, he was engaged in farming with his brothers. When the call for men came he was among the first to enlist, and left with the Main Expeditionary Force.
Private F. N. SHERWELL, wounded at the Dardanelles, was born at Wyndham and was educated at the Wyndham Primary School. He was working at Feilding, Wellington province, when he joined the Third Reinforcements as a member of the Wellington Infantry Battalion.
Private Angus McDONALD who was wounded in action at the Dardanelles, is the youngest son of the late Mr John McDonald, Glencoe, Southland. He served with the Fifth Contingent in South Africa during the Boer war. After returning he was five years with the Defence Department in Wellington and Port Chalmers. Previous to enlisting with the Fourth Reinforcements, he was employed on his father’s farm.
Private E. KENNELLY (wounded) was educated at the Christian Bros. School, and left Dunedin with the Fourth Reinforcements. He was a well-known footballer, playing for Zingari-Richmond and representing Otago, he also took a keen interest in rowing, and was a member of the North End and Otago Rowing Clubs.
Private Charles MOORE, Otago Infantry (wounded), is the eldest son of Mr and Mrs J. L. Moore, Tapanui, and is 28 years of age. He left with the Main Expeditionary Force, and was one of the first to enlist. He was a member of the Tapanui Rifle Club, and was considered a crack shot.
Arthur Phillips ANDERSON, reported as having been admitted to the Seventeenth General Hospital at Alexandria suffering from a severe gunshot wound in the neck, is the fourth son of Mr Alexander Anderson, of the New Zealand Paper Mill Co.’s works at Mataura. Private Anderson was just over 20 years of age when he enlisted in the Third Reinforcements for the front from Mataura. Born and educated at Mataura, he was a keen youth for soldiering and fond of drill both as a Senior Cadet and latterly as a Territorial. He was also an enthusiastic member of the Brass Band, Mataura. Private Anderson has two brothers on active service; one being at the Dardanelles and the other now in camp training in the Earl of Liverpool’s Own.
Private R. E. M. WILSON, of Southland, who joined the Otago Infantry Battalion with the Main Expeditionary Force, has been twice wounded at the Dardanelles, once in a bayonet charge in April and again on August 9 at the Suvla Bay landing.
Gunner J. H. NORTH, of the New Zealand Field Artillery, wounded at the Dardanelles, is the youngest son of Mr W. J. North, of Sydenham, Christchurch, and is 26 years of age. He was born in Christchurch and educated at the Waltham School. He was for five years a member of E Battery, and had passed all his gunnery tests, and received certificates of qualification. When the Forces were mobilised, Gunner North was called up immediately. At Trentham he was offered promotion, but preferred to stick to his gun. Gunner North has two brothers who served in the South African war, one of whom is at present, and has been for many years, with the Permanent Artillery, Dunedin.
Private Thomas Smith KNOX, Otago Infantry (wounded), is 24 years of age, and the second eldest son of Mr James Knox, Baloon Farm, Kaitangata. Private Knox was born and brought up in Inchclutha and educated at the Stirling School. He worked at sawmills in the Catlins and Southland districts, and was working at Mr George Bickens’s mill, Otaomomo, when he joined the Fourth Otago Reinforcements.
Private C. L. JAMPEN, killed at the Dardanelles, was born in Geelong, Victoria, and came to New Zealand three years ago. He was in the employ of A. and T. Burt's for some time, but left that firm on account of slackness. Then he was employed by Dr Douglass, of Oamaru, as motor driver, where he enlisted for the front with the First Contingent.
Private Thomas Stanley LOGAN, killed in action at the Dardanelles, left with his youngest brother in the Fifth Reinforcements. At Trentham they were transferred to the Fourth Reinforcements, and on arrival at Egypt were detained as garrison until the arrival of the Fifth. Thomas Logan was 26 years of age, and was for a while in the North Island on a bush contract. He played in the Star Football Club.
Private James DAVIES, oldest son of Mr Charles Davies, drover, was born at Croydon, near Gore, and was in his twenty-third year. He was of a quiet, reserved nature, and a general favourite with those who knew him.
Private Robert Joseph KELLY, killed in action at the Dardanelles on August 6, was born at Boyle, County Roscommon, Ireland. He enlisted in the Connaught Rangers at the age of 20, and after three months training at the depot in Galway joined his regiment, which was then stationed at Mullingar. Three months later his regiment was sent abroad. He spent about nine months at Malta, and from there he went to India, where he finished up his time. After his discharge from the army he went home to Ireland for a short holiday, and arrived in New Zealand about two months before the outbreak of war. He joined the Main Body of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, and was to go Home with other Imperial reservists to rejoin his regiment, but owing to illness which he contracted while in camp, he was detained, and finally left with the Second Reinforcements, with which he remained. He was with the first landing party at the Dardanelles, and was there till he met his death.
Stuart Lochiel CAMERON, of the Wellington Mounted Rifles, wounded at the Dardanelles on August 12, is a son of Mr T J. Cameron, of Westmere.
Private William HADDOCK, Mounted Field Ambulance, who was killed in action on August 9, was the eldest son of Mr W. J. Haddock, Symonds street, Auckland. He was born in Dobson Town, near Greymouth, and was 26 years old. Private Haddock was educated at Thames, and served an apprenticeship in the plumbing trade at Waikino in the employ of the Waihi Gold Mining Company. He had been in Christchurch for a few months before the outbreak of war, when he immediately enlisted.
Trooper Thomas WALKER, Otago Mounted Rifles, reported wounded in the shoulder, is the eldest son of Mr T. Walker, 136 Leith street, Dunedin. He was educated at the Albany Street School, and on completing his education served his apprenticeship as a plumber with the firm of Walker Bros. He is 23 years of age, and went with the Fourth Reinforcements. Prior to leaving for the front, he was a member of the Dunedin Football Club. Trooper Walker’s brother (Corporal M. R. Walker) went with the Main Expeditionary Force from Christchurch.
Private Alexander STEDWARD, died of wounds on August 12, was born in Glasgow on April 16, 1890. He arrived in Dunedin with his parents in 1904. A keen Territorial, he enlisted for active service with the Third Reinforcements. He was a member of the Southern Football Club and Cargill Road Harriers Club, and was held in great esteem by a large circle of friends. He was a member of the Cargill Road Methodist Church and Bible class, and is the first of a long roll of honour in that church to make the supreme sacrifice.
Private William Ramsden HARRIS, killed in action at the Dardanelles, was a son of Mr R. J. Harris, of St. Kilda. He was born in Dunedin, and was 22 years of ago. He was a member of the Union and Zingari Football Clubs, and also of the Hillside and St. Kilda Fire Brigades. He was in the coast defence when the war broke out, and at once enlisted and left with the Main Expeditionary Force.
Private E. A. URQUHART (wounded) is the second son of Mr J. J. Urquhart, Dannevirke. He enlisted at Hastings, and left New Zealand with the Main Expeditionary Force. Before leaving he was engaged in farming pursuits.
Private Richard QUIGLEY, who died on August 18 from wounds received at the Dardanelles, was 30 years of age. He was the eldest son of Mr N. Quigley, of Herbert, and was educated at the Herbert Public School. He was at one time a member of the North Otago Mounted Rifles, and was an attendant at the Seacliff Mental Hospital for about four years. Private Quigley left with the Main Expeditionary Force. He was wounded at the landing at Gallipoli, and was in Cairo Hospital for two months. On recovery ho rejoined his company, and died from wounds received a second time.
Sydney SMITH, second son of Mr H. Smith, Rakaia, was killed in action at the Dardanelles on August 7. Some weeks ago he was wounded with a shrapnel bullet in the thigh while carrying a wounded man to safety, and a few days ago a letter was received from his brother (Private Valentine Smith, who is also in the trenches) telling of the rejoicing of his comrades at Sydney’s return to the firing-line. The deceased soldier was in his twenty-third year, and very popular. He was a prominent footballer and a member of the I.O.O.F.
George WALMSLEY, Otago Mounted Rifles, was the only son of the late Mr and Mrs Robert Walmsley, of Grey Valley, West Coast, and was in his thirtieth year. He was educated on the West Coast, and was an engineer. He was in Dunedin when war broke out, and left with the Fourth Reinforcements. He was a keen footballer, being a member of the Kaikorai Club.
Constable R. C. BRIEN, of Oamaru, has received information that his brother, Private William Stewart BRIEN, Fourth Reinforcements, Canterbury Battalion, was wounded at Gallipoli about 8th July, and is now in hospital at Alexandria. Private Brien, who is 28 years of age, was born at Waimate, where his mother still resides, and received his education at the Waimate State and High Schools. He was prominent in football circles, and was a member of the Waimate reps. Private Brien was well known in Oamaru, where he was some two years ago in the employ of Craig and Co., and later in that of G. P. Mollison. He afterwards returned to Waimate, from which place he enlisted.
Private G. H. STEVEN, Otago Infantry (killed), was a son of the late James Steven, of this city. Born in Dunedin, he went to the George Street School, and was a carpenter by trade, He was of a quiet, unassuming nature; but when the call came he answered, and joined the Third Reinforcements. He was keen on outdoor life, and thoroughly enjoyed his experience since joining the force.
Trooper J. S. THOMSON, killed at the Dardanelles, was a native of Berriedale, Caithness, Scotland. He came to New Zealand about five years ago and was shepherding for Mr Shennan at Glenburn, and was with him when he enlisted.
Trooper Reginald F. BIRDLING, Canterbury Mounted Regiment, who has been killed in action, was the second son of Mr Frank G. Birdling, of Birdling’s Flat, and was in his twenty-third year. He was a very keen member of the C.Y.C. for some years. Previous to joining the Main Expeditionary Force he was engaged in sheep-farming on his father’s station at Birdling’s Flat. He was a very promising young man, and was highly esteemed. The late trooper's brother Lance-corporal Walter Birdling left for the front in the Sixth Reinforcements.
Private Clarence MARTER, Wellington Infantry, who died of wounds 20th August, was an all-round athlete, being a member of the Union Rowing Club, Pirates’ Football Club, Wanganui, and also a member of the Star Football Club, Napier. He was a brother of C. Marter, sub-editor of the Daily Telegraph, Sydney.
Trooper WEAVER, wounded at Gallipoli is a son of Mr and Mrs P. Weaver, of Alexandra. He is a native of Earnseleugh and was educated at the Clyde and Earnseleugh Schools, and is 25 years of age. He followed dredging and farming pursuits in Clyde and Roxburgh districts, was a keen footballer and sport, and an exceedingly popular and steadv young fellow.
Private G. S. COTTLE was born at Greymouth and educated at the Greymouth District High School. He afterwards was employed at the coach-building trade, in his father’s factory, and at the time of enlisting was proprietor of the Greymouth Central Motor Garage. He enlisted at the commencement of the war, and left New Zealand with the Main Body, being attached to the Canterbury Infantry Battalion. Private George Cottle was 26 years of age when he was killed at Gallipoli on August 7, 1915.
Word has been received that Trooper James ARMOUR was admitted to the Australian Hospital, Heliopolis, on August 14 with a bullet wound in the thigh. Private advice received later reports that he is progressing well. Trooper Armour was educated at the Albany Street School, and was working at Roxburgh when war was declared. He at once enlisted with the mounted troops there. His younger brother, Trooper Hugh Armour, also went with the main body, and is still fighting in the trenches.
A private cablegram received by Mr J. H. Shaw, of “Ngawira,” Waitahuna, reports that his son Trooper Stuart Samuel SHAW, of the Fifth Otago Hussars, is dangerously ill with typhoid fever and gunshot wounds in the chest and right arm. Trooper Shaw is in the No. 2 Australian Hospital at Ghezireh.
Private George CAMPBELL (reported wounded) is a foster son of Mr W. Campbell, of Leet street, Invercargill, formerly a resident of Niagara. He is 21 years of age, and at the time of enlistment was engaged in general labouring work in Invercargill.
Advice has been received by cablegram that Private Alexander Robertson MCLAUCHLAN, the third son of Mr H. M. McLauchlan, of Main South road, Dunedin, has been killed in action. Private McLauchlan was educated at the Forbury School and afterwards privately. He entered the service of the Evening Star Company, and became a member of the reporting staff. He subsequently received appointments on the Timaru Post and Timaru Herald, where he remained about two years, and afterwards accepted an engagement with the Gisborne Times. He was at Gisborne when war broke out, and he immediately enlisted, leaving with the Main Expeditionary Force. He was 23 years of age, and a most capable and promising reporter.
Private Robert RAE (wounded in the head and back about August 8) is the second son of Mr Robert Rae, 3 Hawthorn terrace, Mornington, and was educated at Kensington, learning the trade of pattern-making at Mr Sparrow's foundry, after which he settled in Wellington. He joined the Otago Infantry Third Reinforcements, and was an instructor in rifle practice in Trentham.While at Gallipoli on outpost duty he is reported to have done good service with his rifle against the Turkish snipers.





Return To HOME

FAMILIES I AM RESEARCHING | MISCELLANEOUS GENEALOGICAL STUFF | NEW ZEALAND — ON LINE GENEALOGICAL AND FAMILY HISTORY RESOURCES | NEW ZEALAND — YOUNG BOY IMMIGRANT SCHEME 1911 — 1914 | NEW ZEALAND DISASTERS AND TRAGEDIES | NEW ZEALAND MISCELLANEOUS GENEALOGICAL INDEXES | NEW ZEALAND LAND WARS — MISCELLANEOUS GENEALOGICAL INDEXES | NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR ONE | NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR TWO | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR AND WAR MEMORIALS — BY LOCATION | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR AND WAR MEMORIALS — BY CONFLICT | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR — MILITARY NURSES | PAKEHA/MAORI TRANSLITERATIONS | PASSENGER LISTS TO NEW ZEALAND | SHAND — FAMILY HISTORY | SOUTH TARANAKI, NEW ZEALAND — GENEALOGICAL RESOURCES | SPONDON, DERBYSHIRE, ENGLAND — GENEALOGICAL RESOURCES | WANGANUI COLLEGIATE SCHOOL 1865 — 1947 | WESTERN BAY OF PLENTY, NEW ZEALAND — GENEALOGICAL RESOURCES