NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR ONE
THE EMPIRE'S CALL
IMPERIAL TROOPS, NURSES ETC

The following are taken from newspapers on Papers Past. In many places I have added the first names for search purposes. â€

PRESS, VOLUME L, ISSUE 15042, 10 AUGUST 1914
IMPERIAL ARMY RESERVISTS CALLED OUT - A proclamation was issued yesterday stating that "Whereas his Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to direct by proclamation that the Army Reserve be called out on permanent service, all men belonging to the Special Reserve now resident in the Dominion of New Zealand are hereby required to report themselves without delay to the nearest Defence Office." The Hon. James Allen explains that this proclamation applies only to Imperial Army Reservists, and not to Reservists of the New Zealand forces.

SUN, VOLUME I, ISSUE 158, 10 AUGUST 1914
Sister Louise McNIE, theatre sister in the Christchurch Hospital, proceeded to Wellington on Saturday to join the Imperial Army National Reserve.

WANGANUI HERALD, VOLUME XLIX, ISSUE 14369, 12 AUGUST 1914
Two of the Wanganui Borough Council's employees are proceeding to the front. One is Mr D. W. DURHAM, of the gas office staff, and the other is Motorman [Robert Kampshall] WATERLAND, of the tramway service. The Council last night decided to keep their positions open against their return. Mr Waterland is an Imperial army reservist, who has been recalled to the colours, and has to leave a wife and three children behind him...

WANGANUI HERALD, VOLUME XLIX, ISSUE 14372, 15 AUGUST 1914
Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Alexander [Frank Alexander] WILSON, who has left Wanganui en route to London, was given a send off at the Wanganui Club on Thursday evening by a large number of friends.

Mr Harold William HESSE, who is an Imperial Army reservist, left Wanganui to-day for Hawera prior to his departure with the New Zealand contingent...

POVERTY BAY HERALD, VOLUME XLI, ISSUE 13460, 15 AUGUST 1914
Mr W H GARBUTT, a Royal Navy reservist, who leaves for Wellington tomorrow night, was with the British fleet in China during the Boxer outbreak in 1905.
Two additional Imperial Army reservists who have reported themselves as the local Defence office and are proceeding to Wellington to report themselves are: Frank COOK [1NZEF 10/1057], of Otoko (3 years King's Own Light Infantry) and Walter COUSINS [1NZEF 10/1] (8 years Norfolk Regiment).

PRESS, VOLUME L, ISSUE 15051, 20 AUGUST 1914
Lieutenant John Fowler Guyon HISLOP (Supernumerary) hails from Geraldine. He recently passed the examination for admission to the Imperial Army, and, if possible he will join the South Lancashire Regiment upon his arrival at the front.

TARANAKI DAILY NEWS, VOLUME LVI, ISSUE 80, 29 AUGUST 1914
Lieutenant Harper Mervyn LEPPER, of the New Plymouth High School Cadets, who is a candidate for one of the commissions in the Imperial Army, has received word that he has qualified at the recent military examination for which he sat in Wellington.

NORTH OTAGO TIMES, VOLUME C, ISSUE 13150, 3 SEPTEMBER 1914
No less than one hundred ex Waitaki High School boys answered the call for active service ... there are also three commissioners from the Imperial Army who are ex-Waitaki boys, viz., Lieutenants Frederick Neville HOUSTON, R BARKER and Ormsby George Robins BARNES.

PRESS, VOLUME LI, ISSUE 15075, 17 SEPTEMBER 1914
Captain Arthur Cunliffe Bernard CRITCHLEY-SALMONSEN, Adjutant of the Canterbury Infantry Regiment, is one of theImperial Army officers attached to the New Zealand Defence Forces. Born at Torquay, Devonshire, he joined the Royal Munster Fusiliers in 1906, after having completed his course at Sandhurst Military College. He served at Dover and Limerick for three years as scout officer, and assistant-adjutant, and was then stationed at Salisbury Plains as galloper to General Drummond and brigade scout officer under Major-General Godley. In 1911 he joined the New Zealand Defence Forces, and coming to Christchurch, was appointed Brigade Major and Instructor in Infantry Training.

DOMINION, VOLUME 7, ISSUE 2262, 23 SEPTEMBER 1914
Constable HOLMES, of the Mount Cook Police, who is on the Imperial Army Reserve, has been ordered to report for service to-day, and yesterday his colleagues in taking farewell of him presented him with a purse of sovereigns. Senior-Sergeant Dew and Detective-Sergeant Cassells, in the course of brief speeches, remarked that, as long as Mr. Holmes was away; he need have absolutely no worry about his wife and child, as members of the Forceo would guarantee their support. Constable Holmes had married since coming to New Zealand.

NELSON EVENING MAIL, VOLUME XLV, ISSUE XLVIII, 23 SEPTEMBER 1914
Captain George Robert Holden WEBB (a son of the late Colonel W H Webb, of Nelson) has been appointed officer commanding the Electric Lights Singapore Defence Corps.
Mr George Frederick Vernon ANSON, son of Dr Anson,of Wellington, has received a surgical appointment on the British torpedo boat destroyer, Lookout, of the third flotilla. The Lookout is a vessel of 965 tons, 24,600 h.p., and carries three 4-inch guns.
Major Alfred Edgar GLASGOW, of the Imperial Army, is a Brigade Major in the second Indian Contingent, which sailed for the front about 20th August. He is an old boy of Nelson College and a brother of Messrs A. and J. Glasgow, of this city. Another brother, Major William James GLASGOW, who recently retired from the Imperial Army, has volunteered for active service and has been accepted, but it is not known locally what position he now holds. Major W. J. Glasgow was tho first Nelson Collegian to gain a commission in the Imperial Army. Since his time, many Nelson Collegians have entered the Army straight from the College, and quite a number now hold important commissions.
Following is a list of the New Zealand officers now in England, for whom application will probably be made to serve with the British expeditionary force: - Colonel Vere Staunton SMYTH, Major. M. M. GARDINER [Murray Menzies GARD'NER?], Major George Spafford RICHARDSON, Surgeon-Major Andrew Robert Dillon CARBERY [CARBERRY], Captain Robert Oswald CHESNEY, Captain Rayner Barrington SMYTHE, Captain Charles William MELVILL, Captain Francis Henry LAMPEN, Lieutenant Henry Arthur DAVIES, Lieutenant John Lancelot Harcourt TURNER.

COLONIST, VOLUME LVI, ISSUE 13581, 23 SEPTEMBER 1914
Mr H. G. Berryman, of Kohatu, has received a cable from his son, Mr William Oswald BERRYMAN, who arrived in England by the Rotorua on August 1lth, stating that he had received a commission in the Imperial Army as lieutenant in the Second Dragoons, and expected to be in the fighting line under Sir John French in a few days.
Mr Thomas Pettit has received word that his second son Dr. Thomas Harold PETTIT, has joined the English Army as medical officer to the 3rd Battalion of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Regiment. He left on August 7th to join his regiment at Pontefract, and a cable message subsequently received states that he was later stationed at Sunderland. At the time of his acceptance for service, Dr. Pettit was attached to the staff of the great Leeds Infirmary.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XXXIX, ISSUE 8846, 24 SEPTEMBER 1914
IMPERIAL ARMY RESERVISTS - Commander: Captain John Henry Morris ARDEN, (late) the Worcestershire Regiment (Reserve of Officers). Adjutant: 2nd Lieutenant Alexander Andrew Lochnell CAMPBELL Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (Reserve of Officers). Officers attached for duty: Captain Vincent John SCANTLEBURY, Royal Garrison Artillery Special Reserve (The Cork). Captain Alexander Lyle WATT (5th (Angus and Dundee) Battalion, the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). Lieutenant W. MACKINTOSH 2nd Lovats Scouts. Lieutenant Frank Douglas BALFOUR, the Northern Cyclist Battalion [Name: Captain Frank Douglas Balfour Death Date: 23 Mar 1918 Cemetery: Arras Memorial]. 2nd Lieutenant John Fowler Guyon HISLOP, Prince of Wales's Volunteers (South Lancashire Regiment). Lieutenant Robert BRUNGER, 4th Battalion, the Suffolk Regiment (Reserve of Officers) [Name: Robert Brunger Death Date: 8 Oct 1918 Rank: Captain Regiment: Norfolk Regiment Battalion: 9th Battalion Decoration: DSO Type of Casualty: Killed in action]

HASTINGS STANDARD, VOLUME IV, ISSUE 240, 24 SEPTEMBER 1914
Mr T GODFRAY, nephew of the late Dr S C Godfray, has I understand, secured a commission in the Imperial Army, he having passed the necessary examination. Mr Godfray left Waipukurau en-route to England on Wednesday.

WAIKATO ARGUS, VOLUME XXXVI, ISSUE 5727, 2 OCTOBER 1914
The following information regarding the employment of New Zealand officers in England six weeks ago, or soon after war broke out, has been received at the headquarters of the Defence Department from Major G. S. RICHARDSON, New Zealand representative at the War Office, London: Colonel V. S. SMYTH, lately officer commanding the Canterbury military district, has been attached to the southern command. Colonel Edward Severan HEARD, Imperial General Staff, lately Chief of the General Staff of the New Zealand Defence Forces, has been attached to the War Office. It was expected his duties would keep him there for some little time. Major M. M. GARDINER was temporarily attached to the staff of the coast defences at Harwich. Captain R. B. SMYTHE was at the coast defences on the Tyne. Captain C. W. MELVILL, Army Reserve officer, had a prospect of being posted to the South Lancashire Regiment, and therefore of going with the Imperial reinforcements to the front. Captain F. H. LAMPEN was assisting at the High Commissioner's Office, dealing with the enrolment of New Zealanders in London. Captain R. 0. CHESNEY had a prospect of being called from the Staff College to the War Office, as Major Richardson would be required for other duties than representing New Zealand at the War Office. Lieut J. L. H. TURNER, son of Colonel C. H. Turner, of the Samoan Expeditionary Force, had been posted to 43rd Brigade of the Royal Field Artillery, and Lieutenant H A. DAVIES R.N.Z.A., to the 34th Brigade of the Royal Field Artillery, both of which are with the Expeditionary Force. The last two officers mentioned, therefore, are probably already serving on the Continent. Major Richardson, in his advice, stated there were then indications of many New Zealanders in the United Kingdom getting commissions in the British territorial forces and special reserves. The special arrangements by New Zealand for the composition and equipment of a New Zealand Expeditionary Force, states Major Richardson, had met with the full appreciation of the War Office, their forward state being in very large measure due to the visit made by Colonel Allen, Defence Minister, to London last year, and to New Zealand having been represented at the War Office since the early part of 1912.

SOUTHLAND TIMES, ISSUE 17771, 2 OCTOBER 1914
In the House of Representatives this afternoon Mr J. A. Hanan asked the Minister of Defence: (1) What are the reasons which caused the Defence authorities to discharge from the Tahuna camp in Otago, after his being there for some fourteen days, one Edward BROWN, of Invercargill, who served for fifteen years in the Imperial Army and volunteers, and was recently accepted and sworn in as a member of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force? (2) Why Brown has not been discharged as a member of the said Expeditionary Force. The Hon. Mr Allen (Minister of Defence) replied; From the information at present available it would appear that this man was discharged from the Tahuna camp on August 29 on account of medical unfitness. (2) His discharge from the camp was equivalent to his discharge from the Expeditionary Force. No certificates of discharge were available for issue to those discharged from the Expeditionary Force prior to embarkation. Further enquiries are being made into the circumstances of this particular case.

HASTINGS STANDARD, VOLUME IV, ISSUE 248, 3 OCTOBER 1914
Dr. Cyril James Anthony GRIFFIN, son of the Rev. C. Griffin of Dominion road, Auckland, who went to London seven years ago to study medicine, joined the First Cavalry Field Ambulance with the rank of lieutenant, and was one of the first New Zealanders to go to the front.

TARANAKI HERALD, VOLUME LXII, ISSUE 144501, 9 OCTOBER 1914
Lieutenant Harper LEPPER, of Lepperton, who recently qualified for a commission in the Imperial Army and was ordered to leave with the expeditionary force has now received advice from England that he is under the age limit and has accordingly returned home.
Mr. J. A. [John Annesley] BRAILSFORD, who some years ago was sub-editor of the Taranaki Herald, leaving here to gain wider experience in the United States, and has lately been acting as representative for the Associated Press at Peking, has gone to Kiao-chau with the Anglo-Japanese forces. Mrs. Brailsford, who is a trained nurse, accompanied the force as an ambulance worker.

NEW ZEALAND HERALD, VOLUME LI, ISSUE 15746, 22 OCTOBER 1914
Dr Arthur Eisdell MOORE, of Mount Eden, now resident in London, has joined the Royal Army Medical Corps, and has received his commission as lieutenant.

Mr. Herbert Ambrose COOPER, youngest son of Mr. Justice Cooper, who arrived in England a few days before the outbreak of the war, has entered the Imperial Army. He has been appointed instructor at the aviation centre at Farnborough.

NEW ZEALAND HERALD, VOLUME LI, ISSUE 15759, 6 NOVEMBER 1914
Prior to the adjournment of the Legislative Council this morning the Hon. H. D. Bell, Leader of the Council, referred to a matter which was personal to himself and to another member of his family, in order to free himself and his colleague from any suggestion of having used influence in a particular matter. Mr. Bell said that his eldest son, Mr. William Henry Dillon BELL, M.P., and another son, both volunteered as privates in the expeditionary force without reference to himself and without any other sense than that of the duty they owed to the country. The second son was now serving as a private in the expeditionary force. The eldest son possessed qualifications which induced the general officer commanding to offer him a commission. He had served as an officer in a regiment in the first reserve in England, and was qualified by his services for a commission in the Imperial Army. In the second place it was known to the general that the first expeditionary force was to go to Samoa, and his son was a lawyer who had a knowledge of constitutional law and practice and he was qualified for the special service on the stall which was required. He had the civil knowledge in which the military officers were necessarily deficient, and the commission was offered him without the speaker's knowledge and so far as he know without any recommendation from the Minister for Defence, who did not, as a matter of fact, interfere in the appointment of any of tho officers. His only remaining son was a sergeant-major in the same regiment in which his eldest son had been serving, and he was offered a commission by the Imperial War Office in England without any reference to the present Government or to any official of the Government. He was satisfied the War Office did not know that he was in any way related to a member of the New Zealand Government. He believed also that the commission offered to Captain Bell was without the recommendation or knowledge of any member of the Government...

MOUNT IDA CHRONICLE, VOLUME XL, ISSUE XL, 6 NOVEMBER 1914
A correspondent writes: - Re Corporal Michael Thomas RYAN to whom you referred in last issue (as wounded in the war), he is a corporal in our local C Squadron, and went to England at his own expense about a year ago to get experience in the Imperial Army. Corporal Ryan is well-known in this district, having been prominent in football and athletics.

OAMARU MAIL, VOLUME XXXIX, ISSUE 12389, 1 DECEMBER 1914
The Rector of the the Waitaki High School is trying to compile a complete list of Old Bovs on active service. The list subjoined is tentative and subject to amendments and additions. The Rector would be grateful for any additional information: Lieutenant Ormsby George Robins BARNES, West Kent Regiment; Lieutenant George Martin CHAPMAN R.A.M.C; Lieutenant Frederick Neville HOUSTON, York and Lancaster Regiment; Lieutenant Philip HUDSON, H.M.S. Laurel; Lieutenant J B LIGGINS, R.A.M.C; Lieutenant R LOGAN, R.A.M.C. [?]; Lieutenant Hector Bruce MACKENZIE, R.A.M.C.; Lieutenant Ivan Scott ORBELL, London Territorials; Lieutenant Alexander Croydon PALMER, R.A.M.C.; Lieutenant William Owen Nelson ROUT, R.A.M.C Lothian Regiment; Lieutenant Reginald Marcus STERNDALE, Officers Reserve, Imperial Army; Sergeant N M MACLENNAN (drafted from Glasgow University to Gordon Highlanders) [?]; Patrick Vincent CORCORAN, Trooper, Australian Mounted Infantry, Melbourne; Private Charles HUDSON, Royal Engineers, Brisbane; Private Philip Hastings MCDOUALL, B.E., King Edward's Horse, London; Alix Adair MCMASTER, London, Private Watson Douglas SHENNAN, King Edward's Horse, Cambridge.

NEW ZEALAND HERALD, VOLUME LI, ISSUE 15795, 18 DECEMBER 1914
AUCKLAND GRAMMAR SCHOOL ... Warwick James SMEETON, who is now serving in King Edward's Horse, was first in History ... two Rhodes scholars, Alfred George MARSHALL and Alan WALLACE, have won first class honours at Oxford; both are serving with the colours, the former in Belgium, the latter with the British contingent of our own expeditionary force, where the Rhodes scholar of this year, William Meirion JONES, and Eric Henry ASTLEY, of Leeds University, with others, are also to be found. I have just received a field service postcard from Eric Hector GOODFELLOW, who is serving with the Army Medical Corps in Belgium. He passed the most brilliant examination of the students of the first year at Edinburgh, and was awarded a Vans Dunlop Scholarship of £100 a year for three years. Three others, Reginald Henry MACDONALD, Eric Hardwick TAYLER, Alexander Charles CLAYTON, have been gazetted to commissions in the Imperial Army on the results of their examinations. Tayler was first on the list of the overseas candidates. Over 200 old boys of the school are serving outside New Zealand. Captain Oliver STEELE, of the Royal Berkshire Regiment, was killed in action in Belgium in October; he was a thorough soldier, and had served in the Boer war, and his name still stands in our sports programme as the holder of one of the school records.

TARANAKI DAILY NEWS, VOLUME LVII, ISSUE 165, 18 DECEMBER 1914
THE HIGH SCHOOL - At the end of the second term, Harper Mervyn LEPPER sat for and passed the examination for special commissions in the Imperial Army, and he is now on his way to the Royal Military College of Sandhurst, where he is to undergo three months' training preparatory to joining his regiment.

EVENING POST, VOLUME LXXXVIII, ISSUE 155, 29 DECEMBER 1914
Major Alfred Edgar GLASGOW, of the Imperial Army - he is a brigade major in the Indian Contingent - is an old Nelson College boy. It is recalled that his brother, Major William James Theodore GLASGOW, was the first "old boy" of Nelson College to gain a commission in the Imperial Army. Mr. Horace Ian SIMSON (Napier) has been granted a commission in an English cavalry regiment. Mr. Henry James Fosbery MILLS, son of Sir James and Lady Mills, has passed out of the Royal Military College, Camberley, and has been gazetted to the King's Royal Rifles (60th). He has just left to join his regiment at Sheerness. Lieutenant Ivan Scott ORBELL (Dunedin) is on active service with the British Expeditionary Force, holding the rank of 2nd lieutenant in the 4th Regiment, Royal Fusiliers. He came to England to continue his studies as an architect, with the object of attaining his A.R.I.B.A. During the summer vacation he joined the camp at Bulford, so that he might continue his officer's training, begun in New Zealand. While there, war was declared, and he at once offered his services. He has been in France since 24th September. Lieutenant Ivan Orbell is a brother of Major Orbell, who is coming with the New Zealand Contingent, and of Mr. Allen. S. Orbell, of Waikouaiti. Mr. William Edward Molineux GUY, of New Plymouth, has recently arrived from Accra, Gold Coast, and has joined the London Scottish. New Zealanders will be interested to read something about Major Robert MASEFIELD, of the 1st King's Shropshire Light Infantry, son of Mr. Valentine Masefield, of Akaroa, whose death at the front was recorded about a fortnight ago. On 24th October Major Masefield was second in command, as well as still commanding his own company, short of officers, and of his death on that day his captain writes: - "It was in the trenches of A Company. We had been fighting hard for five days, and D Company had lost all their officers except one, so at 12 o'clock I was taken from A to go to D Company trenches. I said good-bye, and he took my seat. It was there, at about 4.30 p.m., he was killed instantaneously by shrapnel shell in the back." His colonel (wounded) writes from Cambridge: "Always cheerful and ready for work under all conditions, he will be hard to replace." Someone else who knew Major "Bob" writes: "A fine soldier and keen sportsman, his loss will be felt by both battalions of the regiment, by both officers and men."

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3172, 30 DECEMBER 1914
Lieutenant Charles Cochrane ILES, who it was reported had died from wounds, was a son of Mr Walter Iles, of Ngatapa, Gisborne, and formerly of Dunedin. Deceased was 29 years of age. He was a student at Otago University, and went Home nine years ago to complete his medical studies. He secured his final diplomas a month ago, and volunteered for service.

NELSON EVENING MAIL, VOLUME XLVIII, ISSUE XLVIII, 31 DECEMBER 1914
Captain Charles Harold Reynell WATTS, a New Zealander, has been killed in action. Captain Watts was well known in Nelson, where for a number of years he was a student at Nelson College. He joined the Eastern Extension Cable Company in 1900; but left in 1902 to re-enter Nelson College for the purpose of studying for a commission in the Imperial Army. This he was successful in obtaining in 1905. During his time at Nelson College, he held various positions of importance, and was Head of the School in 1905, and captain of the First XV in that year. When the war broke out he held a commission in the 2nd Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment, stationed at Malta. His death will be regretted by a large circle of friends in Nelson and other parts of New Zealand.

AUCKLAND STAR, VOLUME XLVI, ISSUE 9, 11 JANUARY 1915
It is extremely difficult in this time, when things happen so quickly and regiments are sent out to the front at sometimes a few hours' notice, to get news of New Zealanders who have enlisted or have obtained commissions in the Imperial Army, but by dint of inquiries through friends, consultation of visitors books, likely official places, and by watching the movements of regiments where New Zealanders are known to be, it is possible to get at least some reliable information, as to their present whereabouts. The following is the most complete list, exclusive of those whom I have already reported in "Personal Notes," that I have been able to compile to date: -
Colonel A. E. WILSON, D.S.0., is with the Royal Field Artillery at Bulford. Lieutenant D. W. HUNTER-BLAIR is serving with the "Gordon Highlanders at the front. Mr. C. W. D. BELL, who was at Trinity College, Cambridge, is now second lieutenant in C Squadron of King Edward's Horse. Lieutenant R. E. BARKER, of Canterbury, holds a commission in the South Lancashires, now at the front. Mr. Lewis COHAN has joined the Army Medical Corps. Mr. Guy FETHERSTON, of Auckland, has joined King Edward's Horse. Second Lieutenant J. V. HARRISON, of the 13th Reserve Cavalry, is in camp at Longmoor, East Liss. Mr. H. W. JENNINGS, of New Plymouth, is now in camp with the 2nd London Scottish, as is also Mr. W. E. Molineux GUY, of New Plymouth. Mr. F. F. MILES, who has been at Balliol College, Oxford, is a second lieutenant in the 13th Gloucestershire Regiment. Captain George MILLER is at the front with the 44th Howitzer Brigade of the Royal Field Artillery. Mr. Hector McQUARRIE has joined the Royal Field Artillery, and is now in camp at Farnborough. Sergeant C E. OLDHAM has joined the 19th Hussars. Mr. E. A. SEAGER is in the Royal Army Medical Corps. Mr. Lennard SCOTT is now training with the 7th Royal Sussex Regiment. Mr. N. MACLEOD is in training at Kempton Park in A Company of the Public Schools Battalion. Mr. T. E. WAGSTAFF of Timaru, is in camp with the 8th Battalion of the Black Watch at Aldershot. Sergeant J. H. WATSON, R.N., is now at the Flying Station at Gosport. Lieutenant H. L. J. WALKER is with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment at the front. Captain B FREYBERG of Wellington, of the Royal Naval Reserve, is in England after having been out at the front, where he expects to be sent again shortly. The two sons of Mr. Patrick CAMERON, a well known New Zealander, who is now living over here at Cheltenham, have both received commissions in the Imperial Army. Mr Ian Patrick Cameron in the Cameron Highlanders and Mr. Patrick Kinloch Cameron in the Black Watch. Major A. Dillon CARBERY of the New Zealand Medical Corps, is out at the front sewing with the 3rd Division of the 2nd Army Corps. Lieutenant Dr. A. A. MARTIN, R.A.M.C of Palmerston North, is in the 5th Division of the 2nd Army Corps at the front. Second Lieutenant Ivan Scott ORBELL of the 7th Battalion.of the Royal Fusiliers who is reported wounded and missing, comes from Dunedin. Mr. W. J. SMEETON, son of the well known resident of Auckland, Mr. H. M. Smeeton, is in C Squadron of King Edward's Horse. Messrs. J. and R. S. HELLABY, well known Auckland residents, are in B Squadron of King Edward's Horse. Messrs. C. M. PERRY and E. J. CHENNELLS are attached to King Edward's Horse. Lance-Sergeant R. H. CLEMITSON has joined one of the English regiments, and is now in camp at Hartlepool. Second Lieutenant Frank CHILTON, of Christchurch, is in training at Woolwich with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. Mr C. M. TREWBY, of Gisborne, who arrived in England last month, is in camp with the King's Royal Rifles at Westcliffe-on-Sea. Mr. F. A. HELLABY, of Auckland, who was a First Lieutenant in the Third Auckland Regiment, has obtained a commission as Lieutenant in the Suffolk Regiment. Mr. Colin FERRIER, of Timaru, is at the front with the 4th Royal Fusiliers. Captain J. H. ARDEN, of Cape Runaway, Hawke's Bay, came over from New Zealand when war broke out, and is now with his regiment, the Worcestershires. Mr. A. E. V. WARD, of Auckland, is in the Coldstream Guards, Lieutenant W. O. Berryman, of Oxford (New Zealand) is in camp with the 1st Royal Dragoons at Strensall, in Yorkshire. Mr J. H. ALLEN, son of the Minister, for Defence, is a Second Lieutenant in the 13th Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment, and is now at Torpoint in Cornwall.

STAR, ISSUE 11304, 4 FEBRUARY 1915
Mr W. T. Jennings. M.P. for Taumarunui, has been informed that his son. Mr Harold William JENNINGS, has been appointed a lieutenant in the Royal Field Artillery, and is now in training in Woolwich.
Immediately after the No. 2 Platoon of the No. 9 Company of the Citizens' Defence Corps was dismissed last night, it was called back to attention by Platoon-Sergeant Trent and marched to the end of the barracks under the gallery. Sergeant Trent alluded to the whole-hearted and enthusiastic way in which Lieutenant Stuart RAMSAY had given himself up to his work with the platoon and asked him to accept a copy of the resolution passed on parade last Wednesday, together with a wristlet watch as a small memento from the platoon. The resolution read as follows - "That the No. 2 Platoon No. 9 Company of the Citizens' Defence Corps, hearing that their commander, Lieutenant Ramsay, is about to leave them for the purpose of joining the Imperial Army at the front, feels that they cannot allow him to depart without an expression of regret at losing him, for had it not been for his enthusiasm and hard work our platoon would never have reached the state of efficiency that it has done. We recognise all that he is giving up and the sacrifices that he is making to bear his part in upholding the honour of our Empire, and wish him all success in his career and a safe return to this Dominion."

PRESS, VOLUME LI, ISSUE 15196, 6 FEBRUARY 1915
Captain Thomas John GARDINER, formerly of the 4th and 8th New Zealand Contingents [South Africa], has been appointed camp paymaster at Trentham. The 1st (Kings) Dragoon Guards, in which Captain Gardiner served originally, is well represented in camp, there being no fewer than four ex-members of the old regiment at Trentham. Their names are Captain Gardiner (camp paymaster), Regimental Sergeant-Major LUCKHAM, Sergeant-Major KEEBIE, and Private TAYLOR. The ex-Dragoon Guardsmen also look upon Captain Eastwood, formerly A.D.C. to the Governor, as a "son" of the regiment, he having been born at the time his father was an officer of the 1st Dragoons.
An active service postcard from 'somewhere in France or Belgium' was received at Wednesday's meeting of the Auckland Education Board. It was in the nature of an answer to a letter which the secretary had written to a former member of the Board's staff of architects with reference to his resignation. The writer of the card was Lieutenant William Henderson GIBB, of the Black Watch, and it briefly intimated that he was quite well. An active service card is manipulated something like a ballot paper. There are a number of printed lines, and the soldier strikes out those which do not refer to his case, leaving those which do. The Board decided to write, congratulating Lieutenant Gibb on his appointment to this famous regiment.
Dr. Ivan Stuart WILSON, formerly medical superintendent of the Napier Hospital, has been, since August 10th in the No. 2 Central Hospital at Havre. He is now on active service with the 3rd Division of the Field Ambulance. Writing to a friend in Napier, Dr. Wilson lays stress on the arduous times they are going through, stating that on one occasion he had only three hours' sleep in three days.
Intimation has been received in Dunedin that Private David TORRIE, of the 2nd Battalion Black Watch, was killed in action whilst engaged with a reconnoitering party. He served in the Army for several years, and was with his regiment in India at the outbreak of the war. At the time of the above incident no fewer than five brothers of the Torrie family had answered the call of the roll. Two of the brothers - Peter and Robert Torrie - with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force from Dunedin. [CWGC - Lance Corporal TORRIE, DAVID Service Number 1240 Died 04/11/1914 Aged 26 2nd Bn. Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) Son of John L and Mary Torrie, of Calton Cottage, Selkirk.]
News has been received in Greymouth that Mr Alan Augustus ADAMS [Allan Augustus ADAMS], the ex Otago University football player who left as a member of the New Zealand Contingent that was being trained at Balford, on Salisbury Plain, succeeded in passing the examination qualifying for a commission as lieutenant in the Imperial Army, and so satisfactory was his work that he was given the full rank of Lieutenant, thus passing over the position of Second Lieutenant. In consequence of this promotion, just when the Contingent was about to set out for Egypt, he was instructed to attach himself immediately to the West Yorks at Belton Park, Grantham.

WANGANUI HERALD, VOLUME L, ISSUE 14523, 9 FEBRUARY 1915
Word has been received that two Wanganui men - Sergeant Arthur Trevor D'Arcy LONG of the Collegiate School staff and Corporal Gerald Arthur Arnold BARTON - have been recommended for commission in the Imperial Army.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XL, ISSUE 8963, 9 FEBRUARY 1915
Mr Hurst [Nathaniel Hurst DAVIS] DAVIS, of Manakau, will in all probability go to the front, and if so, he will very likely he given a commission. He has been an officer of the Imperial Army, and did good work in the Boer war, where he saw much activity.

TARANAKI HERALD, VOLUME LXIII, ISSUE 144600, 9 FEBRUARY 1915
We have to acknowledge receipt of the latest issue of The Taranakian, the journal of the New Plymouth Boys High School...The frontispiece is a portrait of Mervyn Harper LEPPER, one of last years boys, who has gone Home to enter a Military College prior to receiving a commission in the Imperial Army.

AUCKLAND STAR, VOLUME XLVI, ISSUE 35, 10 FEBRUARY 1915
Mr. Warwick James SMEETON, son of Mr. H. M. Sneeton of this city, has been gazetted a second lieutenant in the Royal Field Artillery. Mr. Smeeton and his family were in England when war broke out, his son promptly volunteered for active service.
Lieutenant John Arthur Wilkie ROBERTON, of Emanuel College, Cambridge and eldest son of Dr. Ernest Roberton, of Auckland, who served in King Edward's Horse for two years prior to the outbreak of the war, has been awarded a commission in the Imperial Army. He has been posted to the Ninth Service Battalion of the Gordon Highlanders, and when the last mail left London was proceeding to the Camberley Military College for training.

STAR, ISSUE 11310, 11 FEBRUARY 1915
Major Bernard Cecil FREYBERG of Wellington who was wounded at Antwerp and given his majority for services rendered then, is at present in London on short leave from headquarters in Dorsetshire, and was seen by the writer this week. The shrapnel wound in his hand has almost healed, and with other battalions of the Royal Naval Division he shortly expects to be sent to the front again. Major Freyberg is in the Hood Battalion of the 2nd R.N Brigade. Lieutenant William Leonard Deighton GUNDRY, son of the late Mr W. H. Gundry, of Christchurch, who holds a commission in the 5th Devon Regiment, No. 1 Company National Reserve, is at present at Hanwell engaged in protecting railways, etc. Lieutenant Eric Aubrey Hawkes WHITCOMBE of the firm of Messrs Whitcombe and Tombs, holds his commission in the Royal Artillery. Private Donald STRONACH is in the 7th [?] Field Ambulance of the Royal Army Medical Corps, at present at Farnham in Kent. Surgeon-Lieutenant Louis Bruce STINGER, of Christchurch, is with the West Kent Yeomanry at Maidstone, in Kent. Mr Charles Edward ANKETELL of Napier, is at present awaiting instructions and is just now at the Naval Barracks at Portsmouth. Mr William A. MACREADY has joined the 2nd Sportsman Royal Fusiliers. Lieutenant Harold Lawrence NATHAN is in the 67th Brigade of the 18th Division of the Royal Field Artillery, and is just now at Bulford. Second Lieutenant Eric Hardwick TAYLER, late of Auckland, who has been in India for some time, is in the 1st Battalion of the York and Lancashire Regiment. Mr Harper Mervyn LEPPER, of Taranaki, who came over as far as Egypt in one of the transports, and has just arrived in England, has joined G Company at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XL, ISSUE 8970, 17 FEBRUARY 1915
Advice has been received from London that Mr Norman GRAY, son of Mr William Gray, of Auckland, has enlisted in the Royal Artillery, and leaves for the front about April. Mr Gray left Auckland with the New Zealand contingent for the Coronation, and since then has spent most of his time at sea.

PRESS, VOLUME LI, ISSUE 15208, 20 FEBRUARY 1915
That New Zealanders abroad have not been slow to tender their services in defence of the Empire will be evident from the following list of those who are at present on service with the British Army and Navy and Auxiliary Forces. I have compiled it from sources available here, and have brought it right up to date with the latest Gazettes, though possibly there are omissions of officers and men who are serving in outlying parts of the Empire. ABRAHAM, L. M. (Palmerston North); student at Cambridge; Corporal King Edward's Horse; now 2nd Lieutenant Royal Field Artillery. ADAM, J. A. (Dunedin); Trooper Strathcona'a Horse, Canadian Expeditionary Force. AITKEN, Miss (Wellington), Red Cross. ALEXANDER, Major Dudley, C.M.G. (formerly A.D.C. to Lord Ranfurly). Press Censor. ALLEN, John (son of Hon. James Allen), 2nd Lieutenant 13th (Service) Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, training in Cornwall. ALLEN, Dr. W. Guy (Wellington), staff surgeon with the Grand Fleet. ANDREW, Colonel A. W. (Canterbury), commanding the 114th Mahrattas in India. ARDEN, Captain J. U. (Cape Runaway), Worcestershire Regiment. ARMSTRONG, Miss L. E. (Dunedin) attached to nursing staff, Dorchester House, London. ANDERSON, Hugh B. (Christchurch), Sub-Lieutenant H.M.S. New Zealand. ARTHUR, B., Sergeant 1st King Edward's Horse. BABINGTON, Major-General J. M., formerly Commandant in New Zealand, commanding 23rd Division Kitchener's Army. BAILEY, Gerald Deighton, from 2nd Canterbury Regiment, now 2nd Lieutenant Leinster Regiment. BALCOMBE-BROWN, Rainsford (Wellington), student Oxford, O.T.C.; 2nd Lieutenant Royal Field Artillery. BALCOMBE-BROWN, W. E. (Wellingion), student Oxford; 2nd Lieutenant Royal Field Artillery BARCLAY, Dr. H. C. (Waimate), Lieutenant Colonel 2nd South Canterbury Regiment; serving with the Russian Army Medical Service BARCROFT, Penrose L. (Hawke's Bay), Sub-Lieutenant H.M.S. New Zealand. BARKER, Harold Studholme (Canterbury), Sub-Lieutenant H.M.S. Forward. BARKER, Richard Ernest (Canterbury), Lieutenant 1st Canterbury Regiment; now in South Lancashire Regiment. BARNES, Ormsby G. R. (Christchurch), Lieutenant Royal West Kent Regiment. BARRY, A. V., Trooper lst King Edward's Horse. BEASLEY, Miss, Base Hospital, Dieppe. BELL, Cheviot W. D. (son Hon. F. H. D. Bell), student Cambridge; King Edward's Horse, Lieutenant. BERRYMAN, W. O. (Oxford, Canterbury), formerly Acting-Lieutenant C.V.C.; Lieutenant 2nd Dragoon Guards, York; transferred to 1st Royal Dragoons, 3rd Cavalry Division, at the Front. BEVAN-BROWN, F. V. (Christchurch), student Guy's Hospital; Lieutenant R.A.M.C. BEVAN-BROWN, R. E. (Christchurch), student Cambridge; 2nd Lieutenant Infantry Regiment, Kitchener's Army. BIRCH, Jack M. (Wanganui), 2nd Lieutenant Sixth Battalion Fifth Lancashire Regiment. BIRCH, W. R. (Wanganui), 2nd Lieutenant 1st Dragoons. BLACKMAN, R. (Christchurch), Private Royal Fusiliers. BLAIR, Lieutenant A. D., Royal Navy. BLESS, J., Chief Petty Officer, H.M.S. Cornwallis. BLYTHE, A. D. (formerly of Ruahine Battalion), Captain 5th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment. BOGLE, G. Stafford (Whangarei), formerly of Public Works Department, N.Z.; Sapper 1st Field Company Canadian Expeditionary Force. BOYLE, Alexander D. (Christchurch), Lieutenant H.M.S. New Zealand. BRADLEY, Frederick G., driver Royal Artillery; won V.C. at Itala in Boer War; rejoined R.A. as Sergeant-Major. BRIDGER, William Bell (Dunedin), joined Essex Territorials; now with A.S.C. in France. BRISTED, G. F., Corporal 1st King Edward's Horse. BROMFIELD, -, Trooper King Edward's Horse. BROWNING, Rev. F. M. (Selwyn College), student Leeds Clergy School (for Melanesian Mission); serving with R.A.M.C. BUDDLE, R (Auckland), temporary surgeon H.M.S. Actaeon. BUDDLE, - (Auckland), Royal Engineers. BUTLER, Miss Theresa (Wellington), St. John Ambulance in Belgium; returned to New Zealand. BUTLER, W. E. (Wellington), 6th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders. CALLENDER, George W. (Wellington), joined 28th County of London (Artists Rifles); 2nd Lieutenant Infantry, Kitchener's Army, Worcester Regiment. CAMPBELL, Alan Le Grande (Wellington), Royal Military College, Camberley. CAMPBELL, Major C. L. K. formerly A.D.C. to General Babington, 16th Lancers; wounded in November, returned to front, mentioned in despatches. CAMPBELL, Ian P.(son of Mr Patrick Campbell, Christchurch), entered Sandhurst from Cheltenham; 2nd Lieutenant 1st Battalion Cameron Highlanders. CAMPBELL, Patrick Kinloch (son of Mr Patrick Campbell, Christchurch), entered 3rd Battalion Special Reserve of Black Watch, 1913; commanded a platoon in 1st Battalion at front, wounded at Aisne, now returned to duty. CAMPBELL, Thomas (Wellington), Lieutenant Royal Artillery. CARBERY, Dr. A. D. (Stratford), Surgeon Major N.Z.M.C; at front with R.A.M.C. since beginning of war. CAREW, Alexander, late Captain NZ Garrison Artillery; Captain Royal Garrison Artillery. CARLYON, E. T. R. (Wanganui), student Cambridge: 2nd Lieutenant Kitchener's Army. CHALLIS, C. (Wellington), dental surgeon; with Expeditionary Force. CHAPMAN, G. M. (son of Mr Justice Chapman), student at Cambridge and London Hospital; serving with R.A.M.C. CHAPPLE, Dr. W. A., M.P. (Wellington); Major R.A.M.C. (service within England). CHAYTOR, Lieutenant-Colonel D'Arcy (Blenheim), formerly commanding 10th Nelson Mounted Rifles; was Supply Commandant at Dunkirk for operations of R.N. Division in North Belgium; now commanding A.S.C. of R.N. Division. CHENNELLS, - (Masterton) Trooper King Edward's Horse; transferred to N.Z. Expeditionary force (British section). CHESNEY, Captain R. O, New Zealand Staff Corps), on Staff Division Kitchener's Army at Chelmsford; transferred to Warwick. CHILTON, Frank (Christchurch), training at Woolwich; 2nd Lieutenant Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. CHING, W. T. (Auckland), King Edward's Horse: 2nd Lieutenant Royal Field Artillery. CHOYCE, Dr. Charles Coley (Auckland), resident surgeon Seamen's Hospital, Greenwich; surgeon Australian Voluntary Hospital, Boulogne. CHRISTIE, Dr - (Wanganui) Lieutenant R.A.M.C., No 1 General Hospital, France. CLEMISTON, R. H., Staff-Sergeant Durham Light Infantry; training: at Hartlepool. COCHRANE, Captain J. K formerly director of Operations in N.Z.; Leinster Regiment; on General Staff 14th Division Kitcheners Army. COHEN, Louis (Palmerston North) student London Hospital; serving with R.A.M.C. COLLINS, Captain R.H. Berkshire Regiment; A.G. in N.Z 1913-14. COOKE, G. A. (Timaru), Assistant Paymaster, H.M.S. Latona. CORKILL, T. F., student Edinburgh; serving with R.A.M.C. COX, -, Q.M.G.. 2nd King Edward's Horse. CRADOCK, Lieutenant-Colonel M., commanded a New Zealand Contingent in South Africa; commanding 2nd King Edward's Horse. CURRIE, D., N.Z. Expeditionary Force (British Section); 2nd Lieutenant Infantry. DALRYMPLE, Mrs (Palmerston North), with Red Cross. DAVIDSON, Major S. R., formerly N.Z. Forces; Indian Army. DAVIES, Lieutenant H. A. (Wanganui) training in England; went to front in August with 34th Brigade R.F.A., still in the field. DAVIES, Major-General R. H. (temporary), commanded 6th Infantry Brigade until Battle of Aisne, invalided Home, promoted Major-General and given command of division of new army at Aldershot. DEAN, Harland H. (Wellington), from N.Z. Forces; Lieutenant in Dorset Regiment. DENNISTON, J. D. (Canterbury), student at Cambridge; Trooper King Edward's Horse. DIXON, Dr. Joseph F. formerly Captain 10th N.Z. Mounted Rifles; Captain 2nd North Midland Field Ambulance. DOLBY, Lieutenant E.B., R.N.R ss Carmania DONALD, Walter Alien (Auckland), student Oxford; Trooper King Edward's Horse. DONOVAN, R. H. (Christchurch), Scots Guards. DORMER-MAUNDER, Miss Beatrice H. (Rangitikei), Red Cross nurse in France. DRUBE, F. P., Trooper 1st King Edward's Horse. DUFF, Hugh (Hawke's Bay), Lieutenant Lovat's Scouts. DUGUID, William, with R.A.M.C. DUNN, A. E., Commander R.N.R., formerly Chief Officer ss Rotorua; minesweeping duty. ELLABY, G. H. (Dunedin), 7th Batt., 2nd Brigade, Canadian Expeditionary Force. EMERSON, Mrs Lilian (Christchurch), nursing R.A.M.C. ENDEAN, Dr - (Auckland), serving with R.A.M.C. EUSTACE, Fred (Auckland), 2nd Lieutenant West Kent Regiment. FAIR, Arthur (Wellington), 2nd Lieutenant 8th Batt. Suffolk Regiment. FAIRCHILD, Miss Edith (Wellington). served in South Africa, now at Royal Military Hospital, Woolwich; gone to a base hospital at front. FELL, David N. (son of Mr A. Fell, M.P.), Lieutenant Commanding Submarine Al2. FERRIER, Colin (Timaru), formerly Lieutenant 2nd South Canterbury Regiment; now 4th Royal Fusiliers. FETHERSTON, Guy (Auckland), served with New Zealand Contingent in South Africa: Farrier-Sergeant King Edward's Horse; now 2nd Lieutenant R.F.A. FINDLAY, Ian (third son of Sir J. G. Findlay), O.T.C. FINDLAY, Lloyd (second son of Sir J. G. Findlay), 2nd Lieutenant Infantry, Kitchener's Army. FINDLAY, Wilfred (eldest son cf Sir J. G. Findlay), joined 28th Battalion County of London Regiment (Artists Rifles); 2nd Lieutenant Infantry, Kitchener's Army. FISHER, Miss Gertrude (Christchurch), Red Cross, Paris. FISHER, Mr and Mrs W. B. (Wellington), working with St. John Ambulance Association in London. FITZHERBERT, Norman, served in South Africa; Lieutenant New Zealand Expeditionary Force (British section). FITZHERBERT, H. L. (Wellington), 2nd Lieutenant Infantry. FLORANCE, D. C. H. (Auckland), 2nd Lieutenant R.F.A. FODEN, F. Watson (Timaru), Officer Cunard Line; Lieutenant R.N.R. FORRESTER, Rev. E. E. S. (Auckland), temporary Chaplain to the Forces. FREYBERG, Bernard C. (Wellington), formerly Lieutenant Hauraki Regiment: appointed Lieutenant R.N. Division; served in Antwerp Expedition; promoted Lieutenant Commander. FREYBERG, Oscar (Wellington), Lieutenant R.N. Division. FRIEDLANDER, Hugo R. (student St. Thomas's Hospital); serving with R.A.M.C. GARD'NER [GARDNER], M. M.(R.N.Z.A.), temporary Lieutenant-Colonel on Headquarters Staff, South Coast Defences, Portsmouth. GARSIA, Rupert C. (Christchurch), Lieutenant H.M.S.New Zealand. GATENBY, James B. (Wellington), student Oxford; 2nd Lieutenant Infantry. GEDDES, Captain Guy W, Royal Munster Fusiliers. GIBB, W. H., formerly 16th Waikato Regiment: joined 3rd Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch); transferred to Gordon Highlanders as Lieutenant. GILES, G. D. (Canterbury), Lieutenant Suffolk Regiment; now Captain 10th Battalion Norfolk Regiment. GLASGOW, Major A. E. (Nelson), Sussex Regiment; Brigade-Major in India. GLOVER, J. (Wellington), Royal Engineers. GOODFELLOW, Eric H. (Auckland), student Edinburgh; served with Australian Field Hospital in France; now 2nd Lieutenant R.F.A. GOULD, Roger (Christchurch), student Cambridge; 2nd Lieutenant Cavalry. GORING, E. Y., 2nd Lieutenant Sussex Regiment (wounded in November). GRACE, Captain H. G. (Blenheim), joined Manchester Regiment; Indian Army since 1905; now at Staff College. GRACIE, T. S., Trooper 1st King Edward's Horse. GRAY, Ronald (Wellington), engineering student South Kensington; Corporal King Edward's Horse. GREEN, A. R. (Otago), student London Hospital; with R.A.M.C. GREENING, R. J., able-seaman H.M.S New Zealand. GRIFFIN, Dr. C. J. A. (Auckland), Graduate University College Hospital; Field Officer 4th Dragoon Guards, 2nd Cavalry Brigade; at front since August. GRIFFIN, Dr. Watson (Christchurch and Dunedin), Surgeon Brighton and Hove Territorials; attached to 2nd Base Hospital R.A.M.C. GUNDRY, W. L. D. (Christchurch), late Lieutenant 1st Canterbury Regiment; Lieutenant 5th Devon Regiment. GUY, W. E. M. (New Plymouth), 2nd London Scottish. HAMILTON, Captain Archibald F., Indian Army. HANNAY, J., Trooper King Edward's Horse. HARE, Edgar (Southland), South African Mounted Police, Rhodesia. HARPER, Commander J. E. T. (Canterbury), King's Harbourmaster, Portsmouth. HARPER, R. Tristram (Christchurch), Major Remount Department, Avonmouth. HARRISON, C. F. (Wanganui), student Cambridge; Sergeant King Edward's Horse. HARRISON, J. V., 2nd Lieutenant, Cavalry Reserve. HARTGILL, W. C. (Otago University), student London Hospital; with R.A.M.C. HASKINS, Basil (Palmerston North), student St. Bart's; temporary surgeon Royal Navy. HAYTER, F. Trooper King Edward's Horse. HELLABY, F. A. (Auckland), formerly 3rd Auckland Regiment; New Zealand Expeditionary Force (British Section); 2nd Lieutenant Suffolk Regiment. HELLABY, J. (Auckland), Trooper King Edward's Horse. HELLABY, R. S. (Auckland), Trooper King Edward's Horse. HELLABY, J. A. B (Auckland), New Zealand Expeditionary Force Section (British Section) 2nd Lieutenant Royal Engineers. HENDERSON, G. D. (son of Mr A. D. Henderson, Christchurch) Hon. Artillery Company. HEREPATH, C. A., Corporal 1st King Edward's Horse. HEWITT, Captain Dudley R. (Palmerston North) Indian Army. HINDE, W. H. R; (Wellington), student Oxford; 2nd Lieutenant Army Service Corps. HINDLE, H. B. (Auckland), Trooper King Edward's Horse; 2nd Lieutenant R.H.A. HINDLESMITH, A., Trooper 1st King Edward's Horse. HISLOP, Lieutenant J. F. G. (Canterbury), formerly 8th South Canterbury Mounted Rifles; 1st Battalion South Lancashire Regiment. HOBBS, C. R. (Hawke's Bay), student Cambridge; Trooper King Edward's Horse; 2nd Lieutenant R.F.A. HODGSON, Miss G. A., Red Cross, at front. HOLDERNESS, Captain Hardwicke, Indian Army. HOLDERNESS, William, formerly Zealand Forces; 2nd Lieutenant Royal Sussex Regiment. HOLMES, Frank (Timaru), Captain R.N.V.R. Antwerp Expedition. HUNTER-BLAIR, Alister, 2nd Lieutenant, Cameron Highlanders. HUNTER-BLAIR, Lieutenant D. W. (Gordon Highlanders). A prisoner of war. HUNTER-BLAIR, Ronald, Midshipman H.M.S.Queen. HUNTER, Miss C. A. (Christchurch) Red Cross. HUTTON, Major Gilbert M. (son of the late Captain P. W. Hutton, Christchurch), Royal Engineers. HYAMS, Jack (Wellington), 7th Batt. Royal Dublin Fusiliers. IZARD, Keith H (Wellington), New Zealand Expeditionary Force (British Section). IZARD, T. A.(Bay of Islands), Trooper King Edward's Horse; Lieutenant same regiment. JACOB, A. C. (Feilding), student Cambridge; Trooper King Edward's Horse. JARDINE, Dr. E. B. (Napier), serving with R.A.M.C. Field Ambulance. JENNINGS, H. W. (New Plymouth), 2nd Batt. London Scottish. JOHNSON, C. J. (Picton) with British Red Cross. JOHNSON, P. R. (Wellington) 2nd Lieutenant 6th Batt. Devonshire Regiment. JOHNSTON, Major F. E. (Wellington), North Staffordshire Regiment. JOHNSTON, O. R. F. (Wellington) formerly 5th Wellington Regiment; 2nd Lieutenant 6th Middlesex Regiment. JOHNSTON, S. N. (Wellington) Midshipman H.M.S. Collingwood. JOHNSTON, Dr. W. H. (Otago and Wellington) Lieutenant R.A.M.C. General Hospital No. 1. JONES, F., Trooper 1st King Edward's Horse. JONES, Nurse, R.A.M.C. KAY, Rev. T. G. B. (Wellington), Chaplain to the Forces, Fourth Class. KELLY, - (Wellington), footballer, Trooper King Edward's Horse. KINDER, T. H. (Wanganui), student Cambridge ; 2nd Lieutenant 7th. Batt. Suffolk Regiment. KINGSFORD, - Sergeant, 2nd King Edward's Horse. LASCELLES, Major E. Ff. W., 3rd Dragoon Guards; Brigade-Major S.W. Mounted Brigade. LIGHTBOUND, A., Trooper 1st King Edward's Horse. LINDSAY, Dr A. B., serving with R.A.M.C. LINDSAY, Captain Michael E. (Canterbury), formerly C.Y.C.; 7th Dragoon Guards; Adjutant Territorial Force. LITTLEJOHN, Dr. C. W. B. (Nelson), Lieutenant R.A.M.C, wounded. LUCENA, Captain L., New Zealand Expeditionary Force (British, Section); transferred to R.A. MANDEL, Dr. Leopold (Wellington), Temp. Surgeon R.N., H.M.S. Donegal. MARTIN, Dr. A. A. (Palmerston North), 15th Field Ambulance: Second Army Corps. MASSEY, J. H (Invercargill), law student; awaiting commission. MATSON, Captain John (Canterbury) formerly New Zealand Contingent South Africa; Indian Army. MATTHEWS, Dr. N., R.A.M.C., Northern Command. MAXWELL-SCOTT, Lieutenant-Commander R. J. N., R.N. H.M.S. Snipe, China Station. MELVILL, Captain C. W., Worcester Regiment wounded. MILES, F. F. (Otago), Rhodes scholar; 2nd Lieutenant 19th Gloucester Regiment. MILLER, Captain George R,, New Zealand Contingent South Africa; 44th Brigade Royal Artillery. MILLS, J. F.M. (Dunedin), student Cambridge, 2nd Lieutenant King's Royal Rifles. MITCHISON, Gilbert R. (son of Mr A. M. Mitchison), Lieutenant 2nd Dragoon Guards. MITCHISON, W. A. (son of Mr A. M. Mitchison), motor-cycle despatch rider; wounded. Returned to duty; 2nd Lieutenant Royal Engineers. MONRO, David Carmichael, Lieutenant R.A.M.C. MOUSELY, E. O. (Auckland), student Cambridge; 2nd Lieutenant R.F.A. MUIR, McLean, Trooper 2nd King Edward's Horse. MUNRO, Roy (Westport), 1st King's Liverpool Regiment. McCONNOL, Trooper 2nd King Edward's Horse. McDONALD, Lieutenant Reginald H., formerly 3rd Auckland Regiment; South Lancashire Regiment. MacDOUGALL, - Trooper 2nd King Edward's Horse. MacDOUGALL, Alan (Wellington). Rhodes scholar; 2nd Lieutenant Royal Fusiliers, Kitchener's Army. MacGIBBON, Dr. F. O. (Southland), awaiting commission. MacGIBBON, R. G., student at Glasgow; O.T.C. McKEAN, A., Trooper 1st King Edward's Horse. MacKENZIE, Dr. E. F. W. (Wellington), Lieutenant R.A.M.C. McLEAN, Lieutenant A. D. D. (Hawke's Bay) Cameron Highlanders; wounded at the Aisne: convalescent. MacLEAN, Rev. Cuthbert T. (Auckland), at front with 4th Fusiliers, promoted Company Officer: wounded; convalescent. MacLEAN, F. S. (Wanganui). student Cambridge; Trooper King Edward's Horse; 2nd Lieutenant R.F.A. McLEOD, N., Public Schools' Battalion, Middlesex Regiment. McLEOD, Miss T. (Southland), Red Cross work in Belgium. McMASTER, Dr. A. C. (Auckland) Lieutenant R.A.M.C., 3rd Lowland Field Ambulance. McNAB, Dr. Angus, Captain R.A.M.C London Scottish; wounded at Messine and missing. McQUARRIE, Hector (Auckland), Theological student, Cambridge; 2nd Lieutenant R.F.A. MACREADY, W.A., Private Royal Fusiliers (Sportsmen's Battalion). NATHAN, Harold L. (Auckland), Trooper King Edward's Horse; 2nd Lieutenant R.F.A. NICCOL, George (Auckland), Trooper King Edward's Horse. NORTHCOTE, T. F., student Cambridge; Corporal King Edward's Horse. OLDHAM, Sergeant H. E. 13th Hussars. ORBELL, Lieutenant Ivan S. (Dunedin); 7th Royal Fusiliers, wounded and missing. O'RORKE, D. C. (Auckland), student Oxford and Sandhurst; 2nd Lieutenant King's Royal Rifles. O'RORKE, M. H. (Auckland), student Oxford; 2nd Lieutenant 12th Lancers. PAIN, K. W.; Trooper 1st King Edward's Horse. PALMER, Dr. A. C. (Dunedin): Lieutenant R.A.M.C. PARSONS, Dr. Harry C, formerly New Zealand Medical Corps; Temporary Major 2nd Wessex Field Ambulance. PENTREATH, Dr. C, H. R. (Blenheim); temporary Captain R.A.M.C. PERCEVAL, Lieutenant C. P. W. (son Sir Westby Perceval), Royal Artillery; mentioned in despatches. PERRY, C M. (Masterton), formerly Lieutenant 9th Mounted Rifles; Trooper King Edward's Horse. PINCKNEY, J. W. (Canterbury); Trooper King Edward's Horse. PITMAN, Lieutenant L. C. (Christchurch), Royal Engineers Temporary Captain and Adjutant, Lowland Divisional Engineers (Territorials). POWNALL, N. (Wellington); 28th County of London Regiment. PRIDEAUX, W. R. B. (Auckland); 7th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment. PRYCE, E. O. (Halcombe), student Cambridge; Trooper King Edward's Horse; 2nd Lieutenant R.F.A. PEMBERTON, T. J. (Dunedin); Red Cross work in France. RAWSON, Dr. H. F. (Wellington), Lieutenant R.A.M.C. RAYMOND, Wynne D. (Invercargill); 2nd Lieutenant Westmoreland and Cumberland Yoomanry. RENANT, Miss (Wellington); Red Cross. RHODES, Lieutenant Eric G, (Christchurch), R.N, H.M.S. Venus. RHODES, Moorhouse, W.B.R. (Wellington); 2nd Lieutenant Royal Flying Corps. RICHARDS, John F. G. (Wellington), medical student; with R.A.M.C. RICHARDSON, Arthur (Auckland); R..N. Division; interned in Holland (Antwerp Expedition). RICHARDSON, Lieutenant-Colonel G. S., New Zealand Staff Corps; D.A.A.G and Q.M.G., Royal Naval Division; Antwerp Expedition; mentioned in despatches; promoted. RITCHIE, Lieutenant-Commander, J. S. M. (Dunedin); H.M.S. St. Vincent. ROBBIE, - Trooper King Edward's Horse. ROBERTON, J. A. W. (Auckland); Trooper King Edward's Horse. ROBERTON, J. B. W. (Auckland); Trooper King Edward's Horse. ROBERTSON, R. (Tuapeka); Marine engineer, s.s. Guildford Castle, hospital chip. ROONEY, R. (Dunedin); Private C. Company 9th Suffolk Regiment. ROSE, Captain A. B. (Wellington), Manchester Regiment; wounded. ROUT, Dr. C. M. (Nelson), R.A.M.C. ROUT, W. O. N. (Nelson), student Edinburgh; 2nd Lieutenant 8th Battalion Royal Scots. RUSSELL, Captain G. G.; King Edward's Horse. RUSSELL, H. B. R. (Wellington), Lieutenant R.A.M.C.; Field Ambulance. RYAN, M. (Dunedin), late Otago Hussars; Lance-Corporal King's Liverpool Regiment; wounded at Monz; convalescent; promoted Staff-Sergeant. SALMOND, W. G. (Wellington); 2nd Lieutenant 21st Lancers. SCOTT, Leonard; 9th Royal Sussex Regiment. SEAGER, Dr. E. A. (Wellington); at front with R.A.M.C.; invalided; returned to New Zealand. SHENNAN, W. D. (Dunedin), student Cambridge; Trooper King Edward's Horse. SIMSON, Donald (Auckland); Captain King Edward's Horse, transfered to New Zealand Expeditionary Force British Section. SIMSON, H. Ian (Napier); 2nd Lieutenant Cavalry. SMEETON, W. J. (Auckland); Trooper King Edward's Horse. SMITH, Dr. Sydney (Wellington); R.A.M.C. SMYTH, Lieutenant-Colonel, V. S.; Staff duties in England. SMYTHE, Captain R. B. (Dunedin), R.N Z.A.; General Staff Officer, 3rd Grade Tyne Coast Defences. SPROULE, G. M.; Army Corps. STANLEY, Captain Norman L. (Otago) R.N. H.M.S. Europa. STEELE, Hector (Waikato); Gunner R.F.A. STEWART, Dr. W. J. (Balclutha); R.A.M.C. STRINGER, Dr. L. B. (Christchurch); Lieutenant R.A.M.C. STRONACH, Donald (Stratford), Private; Field Ambulance, R.A.M.C. SUNDERLAND, G. Trooper 1st King Edward's Horse. SUNDERLAND, M. L. (Napier) SYMONS, Midshipman 0. J. L.; H.M.S. New Zealand. TATE, Lieutenant A. R. W. (Wellington); formerly 5th Wellington Regiment; now Liverpool Regiment. THOMAS, Alban Christchurch); Legion of Frontiersmen. THOMSON, Lieutenant Colin S. (Dunedin): R.N., H.M.S.A. Buscade. TIGAR, the very Rev. Father Gilbert (Auckland); Highland Division. TODD, Lancelot B. (Auckland), footballer; Sergeant Nevr Zealand Expeditionary Force, British Section. TODD, Dr. W. A. R.A.M.C. TOMLINSON, - Corporal 2nd King Edward's Horse. TREWBY, C. M.; Private 14th Battalion King's Royal Rifles. TURNBULL, Lieutenant Alan; expert in explosives; Canadian Expeditionary Force. TURNER, Lieutenant J. L. H. (Wellington); R.N.Z.A; with 43rd Brigade R.F.A. TWEED, Dr. Martin (Christchurch); O.T.C. London Univereity. TWIGG, Dr. Garnet W. (Hawke's Bay); R.A.M.C. VICKERMAN, Dr P. S. Lieutenant R.A.M.C. WAGSTAFF, T. R (Timaru); 8th Battalion Black Watch. WALKER, Lieutenant H. J. I. (Auckland); Royal Warwickshire Regiment; reported missing. WARD, H. E. V. (Auckland); Coldstream Guards. WARE, E. (Auckland); West Kent Yeomanry. WATSON, Dr. Donald; R.A.M.C. WATSON, J. H.; Sergeant R.N. Air Service, Gosport. WATSON, W. E.; Trooper 1st King Edward's Horse. WEBER, G. K. (Auckland) Royal Fusiliers. WELSBY, Dr.Claude B.(Wellington); with Red Cross. WETHERED, Arnold H. (Gisborne); formerly E.C, Hussars; Lieutenant Infantry Reserve. WHITCOMBE, E. A. H., Trooper King Edward's Horse; 2nd Lieutenant R.F.A. WHITE, Dr. H. P. W. (Blenheim); R.A M.C. WILDING, A. F. (Christchurch); 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines. WILLCOX, Lieutenant H. D. D. (Canterbury); formerly 1st Canterbury Regiment; Sherwood Foresters, 18th Infantry Brigade. WILLES, Hubert, Strathcona's Horse, Canada. WILLIAMS, Captain Harold S.; New Zealand Contingent South Africa; Dorsetshire Regiment. WILLIAMS, Captain Reginald N.; New Zealand Contingent South Africa; York and Lancaster Regiment; Adjutant Territorial Force. WILLIAMS, S. C. (Wanganui); 2nd Lieutenant R.F.A. WILLIAMS, S. R. (Wanganui); Trooper King Edward's Horse. WILSON, Colonel A. E., D.S.0., R.F.A. WILSON, Dr. Ivan S. (Napier); 9th Field Ambulance, 3rd Division. WILSON, Kirkby H. (Auckland); 2nd Lieutenant Royal Engineers. WREN, - Lieutenant Strathcona's Horse; Canadian Expeditionary Force. WRIGHT, Captain Walter C. (Dunedin); Northumberland Fusiliers; Superintendent of Gymnasia, Southern Command. WRIGLEY, Edgar (footballer); New Zealand Expeditionary Force (British Section). YOUNG, Dr. A. M. (Auckland); Lieutenant R.A.M.C, Lowland Mounted Brigade. YOUNGHUSBAND, L. N. (Wanganui), student Cambridge; Trooper King Edward's Horse; 2nd Lieutenant, R.F.A.

FEILDING STAR, VOLUME XI, ISSUE 2576, 22 FEBRUARY 1915
Mr Percival Henry Crespigny PIRANI, lately of the Public Health Department, has been a visitor to Christchurch en-route to London to join the Imperial Army (says the Christchurch Sun). Mr Pirani served under Lord Metheun in South Africa, holding a commission in the Imperial Yeomanry when he was 18, during the Boer War, portion of the time being spent in the Headquarters Staff of the Imperial Yeomanry with the late Lord Chesham.

STAR, ISSUE 11320, 23 FEBRUARY 1915
Mr Harper M. LEPPER, of Taranaki, who traveled as far as Alexandria with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, continued his journey on an Australian troopship and arrived at Devonport on December 29. He has now joined G Company at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, where he is undergoing a three-months course of study, it is his intention to take up a commission in the Imperial Army and go to the front, with the hope of finally obtaining a transfer to the Indian Army.
Dr Arthur Owen EVANS (M.B., Ch.B.), of Wanganui, has come over to England to offer his services either at the front or in a base hospital, and while awaiting an appointment will spend the intervening time in London, Middlesex and St Bartholomew's Hospitals.
Dr John Mitchell MEHAFFY, formerly of Invercargill, has joined the 2nd Australian Expeditionary Force with the rank of surgeon-captain.

OTAGO DAILY TIMES, ISSUE 16317, 25 FEBRUARY 1915
Mr G. P. Donnelly, of Taradale, has received a cable message from England stating (says the Hawke's Bay Herald) that his grandson (Mr Derrick PERRY), who has just passed his examination for the navy, is seriously ill at Osborne owing to an attack of pneumonia.
Mr David MARSHALL, son of Mr William Marshall, Warepa, is now a member of the Royal Veterinary Corps with the Imperial troops in Flanders (says the Balclutha Free Press). Mr Marshall, along with several other graduates of the Royal Veterinary College, Edinburgh, had offered his services to the army before war broke out, and immediately on that momentous event he saw service in the great military camp at Aldershot, where for some time four train loads of horses arrived daily, and each animal had to be inspected by a veterinary surgeon. Mr Marshall holds the rank of lieutenant in the Imperial army, and also fulfills the duties of censor to the regiment to which he is attached.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3181, 3 MARCH 1915
Lieutenant N D BLAIR [?], Royal Navy, mentioned in our issue of Wednesday last as one of the New Zealanders at the front, is the son of Mr John Blair of Abbotsford.
Mr Cuthbert Russell DIGBY, formerley of Christchurch, but who is now in South Africa, has received an appointment as staff quartermaster sergeant to Colonel Collyer, chief staff officer to General Botha, and will accompany the latter in the opeartions against German South-West Africa.
Advice has been received that Mr Cyril Elphinstone FERGUSON, erstwhile telegraph messenger in Napier, is now attached to the Royal Flying Corns at Aldershot (says the Telegraph). Mr Ferguson qualified for a cadetship five years ago, and rendered good service in the Napier operating room for some time. About two years ago he joined the Australian wireless company in which service he gained rapid promotion. In December he threw up a lucrative wireless appointment to enlist.
A striking instance of the call of the Empire to the individual has been furnished in the ease of Mr George Thomas BARDILL, who left Dannevirke on February 22 (says the News) en route for England. Mr Bardill was a saddler at Weber, and at the outbreak of the war immediately volunteered for the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. He is a man of fine physique and a good rifle shot, but unfortunately has a defect that debars him from serving his King - he is blind in one eye. Mr Bardill was not satisfied with one rejection. He tried again, but the Defence Department, while sympathising with him regretted to have to permanently 'turn him down.' This decided Mr Bardill. He disposed of his business at Weber, and booked a passage at his own expense for England with the determination of enlisting in Kitchener's army. If at Home the medical test again disqualifies him, he has expressed his determination to go across to the Continent and get into the firing line with either the French or Belgian array. Mr Bardill has two brothers at the front, and as he is a good man with a gun he does not see why through his physical defect he should be deprived of fighting with them. Mr Bardill boarded the train with all the quietness of a civilian, and no more loyal patriot has left that district.
A special meeting of the Waimate Hospital Committee was held on the 22nd (says the correspondent of the Christchurch Press) to deal with an application received from Dr Herbert Clifford BARCLAY, the hospital surgeon, for an extension of his leave of absence so as to cover 12 months service with Lord Kitchener's Army, in which he was seeking a commission as an officer, and the return to New Zealand, or else till the end of the war. The position is that Dr Barclay was granted 18 months leave, and there are 10 months still to go. The committee refused the application for extension of leave.

The following is an interesting extract from the British Journal of Nursing: - We feel sure New Zealand nurses will rejoice to learn that the four registered New Zealand nurses working under the French Flag Nursing Corps have won high praise from their superiors. Sisters Lily LIND and Margaret HITCHCOCK have gained respect at Rouen, and Sisters Ella Kate COOKE and Mary Audley EADDY, we learn, are very much liked in their services at Cernay, and it is not improbable that the former will be made infirmiere-major, as her doctor thinks very highly of her work. We feel sure our numerous readers in New Zealand will rejoice at their success, especially in a service so novel and difficult.
Lieutenant H. O. JOYCE, R.N., well known in Bluff as an officer of H.M.S. Pioneer, and who is a son [?] of the late Mr [John] Joyce, who for many years represented the Lyttelton constituency in Parliament, was wounded during the recent bombardment by British warships of the German trenches near Dunkirk. He was mentioned in despatches at the time, and has had the Distinguished Service Cress conferred upon him by the King. At the time of the Dunkirk bombardment he was on H.M.S. Vestal, a sister ship to H.M.S. Torch, now in Wellington Harbour. The vessel was in a dangerous position, lying close inshore, and inside the line of monitors, which were shelling the enemy out of their trenches. A German shell disabled a gun crew, and Lieutenant Joyce was struck by two shrapnel bullets.

SOUTHLAND TIMES, ISSUE 17451, 4 MARCH 1915
Dr Fergus H YOUNG, of Levin, who has been a house physician at the Belvidere Fever Hospital, Glasgow, since last September had received a commission in the Royal Army Medical Corps. He leaves Glasgow tomorrow and will take up his commission next week.

NORTH OTAGO TIMES, VOLUME CI, ISSUE 13235, 5 MARCH 1915
Dr Agnes BENNETT of Wellington, volunteered for service with the French Red Cross Society, and being accepted will leave for London on her way to join the staff about the end of the month.
Captain Harold Sutton WILLIAMS, of the Dorsetshire Regiment, has been promoted to tho rank of major. He has quite recovered from the wound he received at Mons, and is back at the front again. Major Williams is a Napier boy.
Mr John Hugh ALLEN, son of the late James Allen, has received a commission in the British Army and is 2nd Lieutenant in the 13th (service) Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment, which is now in training in Cornwall.
Quartermaster-Sergeant Allan E DUNCAN of the 13th Regiment, and Sergeant James Wynyard DAVISON, of the machine-gun section of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, now in Egypt, have received commissions in the Imperial Army.

STAR, ISSUE 11330, 6 MARCH 1915
Sergeant James Wynyard DAVISON, of the Canterbury Battalion of the Main New Zealand Expeditionary Force now in Egypt, who has received a commission in the Imperial Army, originally belonged to the 18th (North Canterbury and Westland) Regiment, but was transferred to the machine gun section of the Canterbury Infantry Battalion while the force was in camp at Sockburn.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3182, 10 MARCH 1915
News has been received that Lieutenant F. G. COOPER, R.N.R., who left New Zealand with the main Expeditionary Force, as Naval Transport Officer of H.M.N.Z. No. 9, has been promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-commander, and appointed to the command of a torpedo-boat engaged between Suez and Port Said.

FEILDING STAR, VOLUME XI, ISSUE 2576, 6 MARCH 1915
By the last English mail, Mr and Mrs Ruscoe, of Foxton (says the Herald) received a brief letter from their second son* Alfred Cooper RUSCOE who is in the Life Guards. He had been in the thick of the fighting from September to November in the Ypres area. He returned to London at Christmas time, He also forwarded his mother Princess Mary's gift box of sweets and one of the Queen s gifts, a very neat writing companion. The photos of their Majesties and the Princess are included, together with the Christmas greetings. [UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919 Name: Alfred Cooper Ruscoe Birth Place: Timaru, New Zealand Death Date: 13 May 1915 Death Place: France and Flanders Enlistment Place: London Rank: TPR. Regiment: Household Cavalry and Cavalry of the Line Battalion: Household Cavalry. 1st Life Guards Regimental Number: 2287 Type of Casualty: Killed in action Theatre of War: Western European Theatre][* actually brother to Herbert Lyttelton Roscoe of Foxton.]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3183, 17 MARCH 1915
Cecil HUMPHRIES, a New Zealander, who joined the Army Service Corps on the outbreak of war, and later exchanged into the 1st Manchesters, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal and promoted to sergeant. On the battlefield Brigadier-general Strickland assembled the men and decorated Humphries.

NORTH OTAGO TIMES, VOLUME CI, ISSUE 13246, 18 MARCH 1915
A cable message has been received in Napier stating that Mr. Alexander Lyle (Alec) WATT, brother of Miss Mary Watt, of Napier, had been killed in action during a recent fight in France. The late Mr Watt was a young Scottish solicitor, and came out to New Zealand just before the war to visit his sister. He held a commission in a Territorial regiment at Home, and immediately on the outbreak of war rejoined his regiment.
Mrs H S Hadfield, of Lindale, Paraparaumu, has just received word that her brother Captain Henry Phelps TUCKEY, has been promoted to the rank of major in the British Imperial Army. Major Tuckey, states the Otaki Mail, has seen considerable service in Africa, and is at present engaged in dealing with the German disturbances in West Africa. He is in command of the forces allotted for this work.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3185, 31 MARCH 1915
Sergeant Michael Thomas RYAN, until recently of Matakanui, and a member of the 5th Regiment, Otago Hussars, is the subject of a communication which has been received by the local defence authorities, who are forwarding the information to his relatives. He joined the Imperial army in England, and was wounded, but has completely recovered. He was promoted to his present rank in November, 1914, and since then he has been at the Altcar School of Musketry, passing out with a high percentage of marks. He is at present engaged as staff sergeant-instructor at the school, but he expects to return to the front before April.
New Zealanders at Home have subscribed about £8000 towards providing a convalescent home for invalided soldiers and necessary comforts for the men at the front. Mr and Mrs Irven Willis [and Sarah] RAYMOND are regular attenders at the executive. Other members of their family in harness are Mr Wynne Dudley RAYMOND, who recently left Harrow. He is a lieutenant in the Westmoreland and Cumberland Yeomanry. Miss Gladys RAYMOND is a nurse (Red Cross) at the Mayfair Private Hospital for wounded soldiers. Miss Elaine RAYMOND is honorary private secretary to Colonel Bruce Porter. O.C., No. 3 London General (Military) Hospital.
The Sydney Daily Telegraph states that Captain John LUCE, R.N., who is in command of the squadron which was responsible for the destruction of the Dresden, is partly of New Zealand origin. His father, who was a captain in the navy and commanded a sloop of war during the New Zealand war, married in the dominion, and Captain Luce was born before his parents returned to England.
Mr John Stuart WHITE, formerly of this town, who has been with the Rover Motor Cycle and Car Company, Coventry, England, and Nobel's Explosive agent in Leeds, England, is now in France as a motor driver in the British Army Service Corps.
Mr Frederick Esk SANDFORD, who was the first airman to make successful flights in Auckland, is a through passenger by the Niagara. He proposes to join the Royal Flying Corps when in England. Mr Sandford enlisted at the outbreak of the war, and was with the Australian Forces at the capture of Rabaul.
Mr James Lloyd FINDLAY, second son of Sir John and Lady Findlay, has a commission as second lieutenant 7th Battalion East Surrey Regiment.
Mr Richard Herbert MARRYATT, son of Mr Henry Marryatt (a resident of Milton in the old days), has (the Bruce Herald states) been appointed second lieutenant of the Worcester Regiment, England.
Mr Hugh Montagu BUTTERWORTH, of Wanganui College, a well-known cricketer, has received a commission in the Rifle Brigade (the 95th Rifles), and is in training at Aldershot.
It is stated that Mr Charles Arthur Whitmore MONCKTON, who contested the Otaki seat in 1911, has received a commission with Kitchener's new army.
Corporal Stuart JOHNSTONE, a grandson of the Rev. Mr Johnstone, formerly of Port Chalmers, and son of Dr Johnstone, was at college in England when war broke out. He at once enlisted as a despatch rider, and was constantly engaged on dangerous duty, being twice wounded. Corporal Stuart Johnstone, whose portrait appears in our illustrated pages, was given his name in memory of the late Dr Stuart, of Knox Church, who was the firmest of friends with the young man's father and grandfather.

STAR, ISSUE 11356, 7 APRIL 1915
Mr Harold Elias WARD (Auckland) of the 2nd Division of the 3rd Coldstream Guards, was badly wounded while in the trenches some little time ago, receiving a first shot in his shoulder which severed his epaulet, then another from a sniper which cut the wire of his cap, and finally the shot which disabled him in the knee. He came over to England to convalesce and has already so effectually recovered as to be returning to the front very shortly.

Mr Guy FETHERSTON (Auckland), who was in King Edward's Horse, has been gazetted First Lieutenant in the Royal Field Artillery at Athlone - the battery next due for despatch to the front.

Mr Ronald GRAY has been transferred from King Edward's Horse to the Royal Field Artillery, in which he holds a second lieutenancy. He is now in training at Preston.

Miss Ethel Mary Lewis, a Government nurse from Otaki, who is in England on leave, has been given six months extension in order to go on service in Serbia.

Lieutenant [John Lancelot Harcourt TURNER?] TURNER, of the New Zealand Royal Field Artillery, who is attached to the First Division of the R.F.A. here, is in London on five days leave of absence - his second since war broke out.

He is in excellent health. Lieutenant [Henry Cornwall DAVIES?] DAVIES, of the New Zealand Royal Field Artillery, and now attached to the 3rd Division of the R.F.A. here, has been transferred to the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in Egypt.
Mr Cheviot Wellington Dillon BELL, son of the Hon R. D. Bell, has been transferred from King Edward's Horse to the 10th Hussars in which he holds a commission. It is understood that nominations for the 10th Hussars can only be received from his Majesty the King.
Mr Albert TEES, of New Zealand, is serving as a gunner with No. 91 Heavy Battery R.G.A., now stationed at Woolwich. [Imperial Reservist. Regimental Number 62333]
Mr J. W. MORTON, of Rangiora, who was one of the Army Reservists who came over on the outbreak of war, is also with No. 91 Battery at the Cambridge Barracks, Woolwich. [Is this ? UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919 Name: James Mclaren Morton Birth Place: Glasgow Death Date: 22 Aug 1918 Death Place: France and Flanders Enlistment Place: Ardrossan, Argyll Rank: Gunner Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery Regimental Number: 145767 Type of Casualty: Died of wounds Theatre of War: Western European Theatre.]
Mr John RESCORL is a gunner in the Anti Aircraft Corps now stationed at Wellington Barracks. [Imperial Reservist]
Mr George Frederick Rainsford SHELDON, of Canterbury is a sergeant in the 2nd King Edward's Horse, now at Woodbridge, in Suffolk.
Mr Leslie Heron BEAUCHAMP, son of Mr Harold Beauchamp, of the Bank of New Zealand, is a second lieutenant in the 8th Battalion of the South Lancashire Regiment.
Mr Alan Le Grand CAMPBELL, of Wellington is in A Company at the Royal Military College, Camberley.
Mr Mervyn James STEWART is a captain in the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, at present in Cramlington, Northumberland.
Miss Mary Alice SHERIDAN, of Napier, is in one of the military hospitals in France. I have not been able to ascertain for a certainty which this is but I think from a letter received by a friend from another nurse that it is the one at Versailles.
Mrs Charlotte Annie HOLGATE, of Marlborough, leaves for France almost at once, attached to the staff of the French Flag Nursing Corps.
Nurse Barbara Sibyl GREIG, late of Wellington Hospital, who was a member of the Queen Alexandra Imperial Nursing Service, is now at the British General Hospital at Versailles, outside Paris.
No fewer than three sons of Sir John and Lady Findlay hold lieutenancies in the Imperial Army. Mr Wilfred FINDLAY is a second lieutenant in the King's Royal Rifle Corps, one of the crack line regiments of England which owns the largest list of battle honours of any; Mr Lloyd FINDLAY who is a second lieutenant in the 7th. East Surreys and who expects to leave for the front in about a fortnight's time; and Mr Ian FINDLAY, who is a second lieutenant in the third battalion of the Special Reserve of the Yorks and Lancs Regiment.
Mr Robert FOTHERINGHAM, who only a arrived here on the 18th of last month, after having been for some time in South Africa, got a commission at once as lieutenant and has been since out at the front, attached to the Base Horse Transport Depot at La Havre, Harne, France.
Three of the sons of Mrs Annie E. Chrystall of Christchurch, are on active service, one [John Inglis CHRYSTALL] being in France with the 13th Hussars, a second [Harvey Matiland CHRYSTALL] has been given a commission in the Royal Naval Division, while the third [Gordon Buchan CHRYSTALL] is in Egypt with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force.
In Auckland, Wellington and Wanganui, where he and his family are well known, the news has probably already been received of the bestowal of the Military Cross for Valour on Lieutenant Cuthbert Trelawder MACLEAN, son of the late Rev T. B. Maclean, of Wanganui, and of Mrs Maclean, now of Auckland. Lieutenant Maclean is one of the very few fighting parsons in the English Army.
Miss Nina May PALMER, of Wellington, a cousin of Lieutenant Maclean, who has been for some months nursing in a military hospital at Marseilles, has just gone to Mentone to a Red Cross Hospital which has been opened there.
Lieutenant (Dr) Herbert O'CALLAGHAN of New Plymouth, who is attached to the R.A.M.C., is on the staff of the Meerut Indian General Hospital at Brockenhurst, in Hants.
Mr Thomas E. HOLMES [Thomas Edward HOLMES?], of Wellington, who has obtained leave of absence from the New Zealand police for the duration of the war, came over with the Army reservists and is now posted to 91 Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, at Woolwich.
Dr William Stephen BAIRD, formerly of Richmond, Nelson, and Otautau, who came to England as surgeon on the Rakaia, has been appointed to the R.A.M.C. southern command.

WAIRARAPA AGE, VOLUME XXV, ISSUE 10713, 23 APRIL 1915
Sergeant Henry Frederick Roy MESSENGER, formerly of Masterton, has been recommended for a commission in the Imperial Army. In a letter to a friend in Masterton he states that he does not yet know whether he will accept the commission.

DOMINION, VOLUME 8, ISSUE 2444, 24 APRIL 1915
Dr. Herbert Jack RAWSON (son of Mr. Herbert Rawson, of Wellington), who was on the staff of a British hospital ship, has been transferred to No. 2 General Hospital at Havre, where large numbers of wounded soldiers, including numerous Germans, are being treated.
Lieutenant Kenneth Sinclair THOMSON, who was killed in action on the Persian Gulf on March 3, was born in New Zealand in 1886. He was the eldest son of Mr John Sinclair Thomson, of Geraldine, who has another son in the North Sea, Lieutenant Colin Sinclair Thomson, R.N., on board H.M.S Ambuscade and another (Mr George Alastair Sinclair THOMSON), who joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders when he arrived in England quite lately.

STAR, ISSUE 11372, 26 APRIL 1915
Mr Cyrus Williams, secretary to the Lyttelton Harbour Board, has received a letter from England stating that Mr James Gordon GOODFELLOW, who resigned the position of assistant engineer to the Board last year in order to study in London, sat for the examination of Associate Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, and was at the top of the list, and won the Bayliss prize. The council of the institution was so impressed with his ability that it interviewed him and offered him a commission in the Royal Engineers. He intended to accept it if be passed the medical examination. He was educated at Canterbury College, and work there brought him under Mr Williams's notice.

OTAGO DAILY TIMES, ISSUE 16368, 27 APRIL 1915
ST. CLAIR. The school has reason to be proud of the large number of ex-pupils who are now away to serve their country. The following is a list, as nearly complete as possible of old scholars who are in the service of the King: Frederick Neville HOUSTON (Lieutenant, Imperial Army), Grange Inglis KIRKCALDY (Lieutenant, Imperial Army), Alexander Croydon (Lex) PALMER (R.A.M.C.). STAR, ISSUE 11379, 4 MAY 1915
Cable advice received in Christchurch states that Lieutenant Henry Eugene (Harry) VOYCE, of Christchurch, serving with the Main Expeditionary Force in Egypt, has received a commission in the Imperial Army.
Mr Claude Ernest Broughton OLLIVIER, late of Christchurch, has joined the colours. Mr Ollivier was one of the staff of the Pacific Cable Company for some years. He then entered the service of the Central Cable Company in South America, but left his position at Buenos Aires to go to London to enlist. He joined the Hon. Artillery Company, and is at present quartered at the Tower of London.
Captain John Henry Morris ARDEN, a New Zealander with the Worcestershire Regiment, who last Friday was reported to have received the Distinguished Service Order for conspicuous gallantry and ability at Neuve Chapelle, was formerly a station holder near Cape Runaway, and was well known on the East Coast of the North Island. When a battalion on his right was expelled from the trenches he formed his company, under heavy fire, and counter attacked the German right with great determination, and the battalion reoccupied the trenches.
Lieutenant William Barnard Rhodes MOORHOUSE, the well-known aviator who was reported in Saturday's cables as having died of wounds received while dropping bombs at the junction of Courtrai, was a son of Mr and Mrs Edward Moorhouse, of Parnham House, Meaminster, Dorset, England, his mother being formerly Miss Rhodes, of the Grange, Wellington (daughter of the late Hon W. B. Rhodes M.L.C.). He was a cousin of Lieutenant-Colonel W. B. Moorhouse of Wellington, and of the late Bishop Moorhouse. Born in 1886, he was educated at Harrow and Cambridge, and married Miss Linda Morritt, late of Rockeby who is left with a son under a year old. He was a most intrepid airman and was second in the Aerial Derby, and he was the first airman to bring two passengers across the English Channel. When war was declared in August, he was among the first to enlist and was kept very busy at the Royal flying base at Farnborough, where he did good work. Lately he was sent over to France in charge of the workshops (Aeroplane Engineers). His brother (Mr Edward Moorhouse), who had a commission in the Royal Field Artillery, has had to leave England for the benefit of his health, and will arrive in Wellington to-day with his brother-in-law (Mr Kyle). A cablegram received yesterday by Colonel Moorhouse states that the late Lieutenant Moorhouse exhibited distinguished gallantry, and has been mentioned in despatches.

HASTINGS STANDARD, VOLUME IV, ISSUE 432, 5 MAY 1915
London cable states that among the Canadian wounded is Corporal BARLINSON, a New Zealander. Captain Charles Arthur Beauchamp Pickard HAWKINS, who left Hawke's Bay many months ago, has earned considerable promotion. On the troopship he was made ship's quartermaster, and on arrival at Cairo was appointed camp commandant, and then intelligence officer. He was A.D.C. to the High Commission during his visit to Egypt, and then galloper to Colonel Johnstone; he was in turn A.D.C. to Colonel Russell, subsequently joining General Brisco and receiving the rank of captain in the Imperial Army. He took part in repelling the attack on the canal, and is now on General Brisco's staff.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3190, 5 MAY 1915
Captain Hugh Bernard WHEELER of the New Zealand Staff Corps, stationed at Kaiapoi, and Officer Commanding Group 11, has received orders to proceed to England for duty with the Imperial Army. He leaves on May 18, and will be accompanied by Mrs Wheeler and family.
Lieutenant George Martin CHAPMAN, R.A.M.C., who has received the French decoration for saving life on the beach at Boulogne, is now serving as medical officer to the 2nd Dragoon Guards (Queen's Bays). He was recommended for the award by the municipal authorities of Boulogne.
Sergeant Henry Cornwall (Harry) DAVIES, of New Plymouth, who left with the first New Zealand Expeditionary Force, is on his way from Egypt to England. He will probably go to the front as a member of the personal staff of his father, Major-general Richard Hutton DAVIES.
Mr W. SMITH, of the firm of Hamon and Smith, left Gisborne last week (says the Poverty Bay Herald), en route to England, where he intends to join his own regiment, one of the artillery companies, with which he saw service in South Africa, and achieved considerable fame as a gunner.
Captain G. G. Smith, Royal Naval Registrar for New Zealand, has been advised by the Admiralty (says the Dominion) that Frederick W. HILLIER, seaman, N.Z.R., 1208, has been invalided and has taken passage for Wellington by the Aberdeen liner Marathon, which left London for Sydney on March 16.
Private J. F. SLADE, a member of the R.M.L.I. attached to H.M.S. Princess Royal, of the first battle-cruiser squadron, has sent to his relatives in New Plymouth (says the Taranaki Herald) a post-card saying that he is "fit and happy." On the post-card there is a picture of the Princess Royal, with the inscriptions: "Inscribed on England's Roll of Fame. The battle of the Bight, August 28, 1914."
Mr [George Melville] BURLINSON, manager of the Wereroa Training Farm, has just received word that his third son [Maurice Alfred BURLINSON], who is with the British in France, has been seriously wounded. Two of Major Burlinson's sons have already been killed on active service.[George Vandergraft BURLINSON 11/8 1NZEF died 06 Jan 1915 Egypt, James Melville BURLINSON 5022 AIF, Maurice Alfred BURLINSON Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force 26037, Robert Archibald BURLINSON 2/1131a 1NZEF]
Miss Nina O'FLYNN, who was brought out from England by the Government, and has for some time past been acting as sub-matron at the Sunnyside Asylum, left Wellington for Sydney by the Moeraki on Thursday, to connect with Omrah for London (says the Dominion). Miss O'Flynn intends to go straight to the front as a nurse, and has already been cabled for, and has had a station allotted her.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3191, 12 MAY 1915
A Napier telegram states that Lieutenant C A HAWKINS of Napier, has received a captaincy in the Imperial Army.[Charles Arthur Beauchamp Pickard HAWKINS]

STAR, ISSUE 11393, 20 MAY 1915
Major William Robinson CAMPBELL, of the 14th Hussars, a New Zealander, has been killed in action. The later Major W. R. Campbell, 14th Hussars, who has been killed in action, was the elder son of Sir Charles Campbell of Cheviot Hills, North Canterbury. He was born on November 26, 1879 and entered the Imperial Army in 1890. He served in the South African War, being mentioned in dispatches, and receiving the Queen's medal, with seven clasps, the King's medal, with seven clasps, and the D.S.O. He was adjutant of the Lanarkshire Yeomanry. In 1907, deceased married Maud, youngest daughter of the late Captain S. Y. A. Davenport, 47th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment.

OTAGO DAILY TIMES, ISSUE 16391, 24 MAY 1915
News has been received in Auckland of the death of Captain Henry John Innes WALKER, son of Mr and Mrs Henry C. H. Walker of Remuera. The text of the telegram from the Secretary of State for War is as follows - Deeply regret that Captain Walker, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on April 25. Lord Kitchener expresses his sympathy. Advice was received on January 22 that Lieutenant Walker had been promoted to the rank of Captain. His name was mentioned in despatches the following month for gallantry and service in the field. Captain Walker was 25 years of age.

PRESS, VOLUME LI, ISSUE 15287, 25 MAY 1915
Second-Lieutenant Preston Logan (died of wounds) was a son of Colonel Robert Logan, formerly O.C. Auckland Military District, and now Administrator at Samoa. He was farming at Waipu when the war broke out and immediately volunteered for active service. He had held a commission in the 11th North Auckland Regiment of Mounted Rifles and was attached as a subaltern to the squadron drawn from that unit for the Auckland Regiment of Mounted Rifles. Lieutenant Logan has an older brother in the Imperial Army [Robert LOGAN ?] and a younger brother [John (Jack) LOGAN] in the Duntroon Military College in Australia.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3193, 26 MAY 1915
Cable advice has boon received that Dr Louis Edward BARNETT, who left Dunedin with his family at the beginning of March, and volunteered for service, has been appointed a surgeon at the military hospital established at Colchester (about 51 miles north-east of London). His second son, Mr Ralph Edward Fulton BARNETT, has received a commission in the Lancashire Fusiliers. Mr Geoffrey Michael Fulton BARNETT, the eldest son is with the New Zealand Main Expeditionary Force.
Advice was received at Wellington on Thursday (says the Post) that Corporal Samuel BEDFORD, of the South Lancashire Regiment, late janitor of the Wellington Training College was killed in action in Belgium on March 12. The deceased's widow resides in Wellington. He was very popular with the staff and children of the Normal School.
Mr Frederick Steward REYNOLDS, formerly of the sessional staff of the Parliament Buildings, who went to England last November, has received a commission as captain in the 3rd Battalion of the Worcester Regiment, now in training in Cornwall. The battalion is expected to proceed to the front shortly.
Mr John Anthony CARR, son of the late R. A. Carr, of Epsom, will sail by the Niagara to offer his services to the War Office. Mr Carr was a member of the Expeditionary Force that went to Samoa. Mrs Carr will accompany her son to England.
The second son of Mr Robert JOHNSTONE, of Motuotaria, left Waipukurau last week en route for the Old Country, where he will join the new army. This is the second son of Mr Johnston who has gone to England for the same purpose. [Melville JOHNSTONE, Allan Murray JOHNSTONE, Robert Bryden JOHNSTONE, Godfrey Gleeson JOHNSTONE]
Mr Duncan Forrest BAUCHOP B.E. A.M.I., Mach E., engineering lecturer on the staff of the Christchurch Technical College, will shortly leave for England for the purpose of volunteering for active service, His intention is to join the Royal Naval unit of the Engineering Division being furnished by the combined Institutes of Mechanical, Electrical, and Civil Engineers, the Naval Engineers being drawn from the Institute of Mechanical Engineers. His brother (Colonel Arthur Bauchop, C.M.G.), at present commands the Otago Mounted Regiment on active service.
Dr Robert Stephen BRIFFAULT, of Auckland, left on Tuesday for Vancouver by the Niagara, en route for England, in order to offer his services to the Imperial authorities (says the New Zealand Herald).
Dr Thomas Harold PETTITT, son of Mr T. Pettit, of Nelson, who has been stationed at a military hospital at Sunderland, has left England for Egypt to join the military hospital there.
Constable McKenzie, of Napier, has received word that his brother, Corporal Walter MacKENZIE, of Princess Patricia's Regiment of Canadians, died in the North of France from wounds received in the severe engagement in which the Canadian troops played so prominent a part. The late Corporal MacKenzie, who was about 26 [sic] years of age, was well known in the dominion, having been commercial traveller for some years for Messrs Virtue and Co., grain and produce merchants, of Wellington. [Corporal MACKENZIE, W, Service Number 51268 Died 17/03/1915 Aged 39 Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) Son of Kenneth MacKenzie, of Market St., Ullapool, Ross-shire.]
Dr Robert Haldane MAKGILL, who for many years past has occupied the position of district health officer at Auckland, recently offered his services to the War Office. The offer has been accepted (says the New Zealand Herald), and Dr Makgill, having obtained leave of absence from the Public Service Commissioner, will shortly leave for England. Dr Makgill has been detailed for special work in the chemistry department, and he will join his uncle, Dr John Scott Haldane, F.R.S., a well-known medical specialist, who has recently been investigating matters connected with the use of poisonous gases by the Germans on the Continent. Dr Haldane is a brother of Lord Haldane, Lord Chancellor, and formerly Secretary of War. Dr Makgill served in a medical capacity with the 2nd Gordon Highlanders in the Boer war.
Three sons of Sir John and Lady FINDLAY hold commissions in the Imperial Army. Mr John Wilfred FINDLAY is a second lieutenant in the King's Royal Rifle Corps; Mr James Lloyd FINDLAY is a second lieutenant in the 7th East Surreys, and expects to leave for the front very shortly; and Mr Ian Calcutt FINDLAY is a second lieutenant in the 3th Battalion of the Special Reserve of the York and Lancashire Regiment.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3194, 2 JUNE 1915
The many friends of Henry Montgomery (Harry) INGLIS will regret to hear that he was killed in action at Neuve Chapelle. Mr Inglis was for some time town traveller for Messrs A. and T. Burt, and was a popular man amongst the plumbing trade, which gave him a special send off on the eve of his departure for the Old Country some three years ago. At the outbreak of the war Mr Inglis joined the Scottish Horse, but subsequently applied for and received a commission in the Gordon Highlanders, being appointed second lieutenant.
News has been received by his relatives residing in the North Island of the death of Lance-corporal Cecil Horatio Childe WILLIAMS, killed in action in France. Lance-corporal Williams was born in Timaru (says the Herald). He was educated at the High School, Wanganui. Eight years ago he went to Fiji, and last New Year he, with 50 other picked riflemen, went direct to England, and after a short training at Sheerness joined the King's Royal Rifle Regiment and left for the front on March 17. His brother Reg [Reginald Foster WILLIAMS ?] is with the Australians at the Dardanelles. Mr Williams, sen., at one time owned the Timaru Brewery.

Captain Gavin Henry WALKER, who was killed in Flanders in March, while serving with the Highland Light Infantry, was at one time (says the Waipa Post) an employee of the New Zealand Dairy Association, by which body he was equipped and sent as captain in the Fourth Contingent to the Boer war. After that he followed the military profession. [Surname: Walker Reg No: 1350 Given Names: G A [sic] Rank: Private Unit: No 7 Company Contingent: Fourth County/City: Waipa Occupation: Settler Ship: Gymeric 31 March 1900 Address: Cambridge, Waikato Next of Kin: McDougall Mrs Rhoda E Relationship to Soldier: Sister Next of Kin Address: Te Puke, Bay of Plenty]

Steps are to be taken to establish a memorial to the late Captain Anthony WILDING. The Council of the New Zealand Lawn Tennis Association has instructed its Management Committee to inaugurate a shilling fund among tennis players, part to be spent on a memorial in Christchurch, Captain Wilding's birthplace, and the balance on Anthony Wilding trophies for the New Zealand championship singles, ladies and gentlemen.

Lieutenant George Martin CHAPMAN, R.A.M.C., the news of whose death on the battlefield was received last month, was 28 years of age. He was the youngest son of his Honor Mr Justice Chapman, was born at Dunedin, and educated at the Waitaki Boys' High School. After a year at the Medical School of the Otago University he went to England, and was for some time on the staff of the London Hospital. Then he entered Caius College, Cambridge, where, as at school, he took a prominent part in athletics. Later, at the London Hospital, he held every appointment that could be given him, and had taken his B.A with honours and passed his M.B. examination when the war broke out. In October he went to France, serving at Havre and Boulogne. In the latter place he was awarded a gold medal by the French Government for saving the life of the captain of a French fishing boat which had been driven ashore on a rocky coast. Then he went to the front, and was attached to the 2nd Dragoon Guards. He was under fire for several days, and himself brought out the wounded. Beyond this his family has no further information. He fell on 13th May in the middle of that period, from Saturday the 8th to Saturday the 15th May, which The Times correspondent says is the bloodiest in the history of Western Europe. Lieutenant Chapman was a man who obtained the confidence and love of his many friends, especially at school, at the university, and at the hospital. When marching through France and Belgium he made the acquaintance of numerous medical and combatant officers, amongst whom was Captain Wilding, who fell a week before him. No one who ever knew George Chapman failed to like him. He never had an enemy. In all things his gentleness and his firmness were unobtrusively but equally apparent. That he had every promise of a distinguished future was apparent to all who knew him. He lived only to be a sacrifice in the great cause which all honest Britons hope will end the foul obsession which threatens the liberty of Europe and the world.

WANGANUI CHRONICLE, ISSUE 20372, 3 JUNE 1915
WANGANUI COLLEGIATE SCHOOL AND THE WAR. The above school is worthily upholding its traditions in the present national crisis. At the outbreak of the war three boys left the school to serve in the army; Ian Macpherson MACDONALD and Alan Le Grand CAMPBELL obtained direct commissions in the Imperial army, while R. J. McDONNELL enlisted in the New Zealand expeditionary force. Four of the assistant masters have temporarily left the school, to serve in the army. Mr Arthur Trevor D'Arcy LONG joined the expeditionary forces as a N.C.O. In December last two other assistant masters left for military service, Mr E. L. WELLS joining as second-lieutenant in the expeditionary force and Mr Hugh Montagu BUTTERWORTH sailing for England to take up a commission there. Mr Charles Maurice BEVAN BROWN, one of the science masters, has since enlisted as a non-commissioned officer in the R.A.M.C. The places of the four absent masters are being kept open for them, and the trustees are paying them so much of their salary as will make their pay equal to the salary they were receiving at their departure. At the end of December last there were approximately 150 old boys with the troops in Egypt while, others were serving the Empire on the western front in Europe. Many Old Boys, it is known, enlisted in England, some of whom had journeyed for that purpose from Canada, the United States, the Argentine and India.

NELSON EVENING MAIL, VOLUME XLVIII, ISSUE XLVIII, 7 JUNE 1915
NELSON COLLEGE OLD BOYS - SERVING THEIR COUNTRY. Old boys of the Nelson College have responded nobly to the Empire's call, and, according to the report presented at the annual meeting of the Nelson College Old Boys' Association on Saturday evening, over one hundred and fifty have volunteered their services...IMPERIAL. ARMY. Lieutenant-Colonel Sisley Richard DAVIDSON and William James Theodore GLASGOW, Major Alfred Edgar GLASGOW, Captains Archibald Francis HAMILTON, Charles Harold Reynell WATTS (killed in action) and Alfred Henry CHAYTOR, Lieutenants Harland Holmes DEAN, Neil MACLEOD, and Arthur FAIR.

NEW ZEALAND HERALD, VOLUME LII, ISSUE 15945, 16 JUNE 1915
Private George Henry TURNER, 4th King's Royal Rifles, who went to the front with the Fiji contingent and was wounded in France, is in the Edmonton Military Hospital, London, suffering from shot wounds in the right thigh and left foot. He has been able to leave his bed, and is doing well. He is a son of Mr. E. B. E. Turner, of Richmond Street, Glenmore, Kingsland [Auckland].

STAR, ISSUE 11420, 22 JUNE 1915
Mrs R D THOMAS [Mrs Richard Dunn THOMAS nee Edith Mary THORNTON?], of Christchurch, has arrived in England from New Zealand, after having been away for a year. Mrs Thomas went over to work in connection with the war, and has already started at the Kensington War Hospital Supply Depot.

Mrs Ralph Neild FLETCHER [Letitia nee GROVE], of Wellington, who has been in England with her daughter for over a year left for France last month under the Anglo French Red Cross Society. She is going to the large base hospital at Nevers, south of Paris.

Speaking to a New Zealand Times reporter on Sunday, his Grace Archbishop Redwood, who has just returned by the Maitai from a visit to Europe, said that whilst in Rome he had the great pleasure of meeting the Rev Mother Mary Joseph AUBERT, who laboured so long here in the cause of charity. His Grace stated that Mother Aubert was, despite her eighty years, in capital health, and was looking forward to her early return to Wellington. When he left Rome she had volunteered to help the wounded, and was now engaged in this work.

Captain James Dalton DINNEEN of the New Zealand Territorial Forces, came over to England in order to take up aviation. He has now been three weeks at Brooklands and has taken his pilot's certificate and been appointed to a probationary lieutenancy in the Royal Flying Corps. He now has a period of three months or so further training before he qualifies for the front.

Mr Harold SALMON, who came over to England to visit his parents before volunteering, has received a commission in the 16th Battalion Durham Light Infantry. Before joining his regiment he is attending an instruction class at Oxford.

Mr Samuel Howard ELLIS, of Auckland, who arrived in England on March 31, has obtained a commission in the 15th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, but is at present attached to the 4th Battalion, which is encamped at Newsham Park, Northumberland.

Sub-Lieutenant Harvey Maitland CHRYSTALL, of Christchurch, of the Royal Naval Division, who was wounded in the Dardanelles on May 5, is now in hospital in Alexandria and progressing very favourably. His mother and sisters, Mrs and the Misses Chrystall, have been in London for some time.

Mrs E. J. FLETCHER [?], of Wellington, is at Dr Haden Guest's hospital at Nevers, France.

Mr Charles Edmund CARRINGTON (New Zealand) has obtained a commission as second lieutenant in the 9th York and Lancashire Regiment, at present at Leming, Kent.

The Misses HIGGINSON and Mary COLLINS left for service in Malta on Sunday. Their address there will be care of Sir Cauthauld Thomson, British Red Cross Headquarters, Malta.

Mr Joseph Ward RUTLEDGE, of Christchurch, is corporal in the Royal Field Artillery, 37th Divisional Ammunition Column, now in camp at Tidworth.

Lieutenant Cuthbert Trelawder MACLEAN, of Auckland, who was in the Royal Fusiliers but had some knowledge of flying and he was also attached to the Royal Flying Corps on active service, is in London on three days leave from France. Mr George Stafford BOGLE, of Napier, who came over with the 1st Canadian Contingent as a sapper in the Engineers, is now a lieutenant in the Royal Engineers. It is interesting to learn that after eight strenuous weeks of soldiering at the Royal Engineers Headquarters at Chatham Mr Bogle, who is an engineer by profession, obtained permission to sit for, and was successful in obtaining, the A.M.I.C.E. degree. He has now been posted to the Engineers of the Scottish Division (Kitchener's First Army), and is at present at Bordon.

Major Henry John Innes WALKER, of the First Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who has been killed in action, joined the Imperial Army from the New Zealand Forces four years ago and was given his company in January last. He was twenty-five year's of age.

Mr Frank Carey BICKEND, of Auckland, has joined the 153rd (Empire) Brigade of the Royal Field Artillery.

Mr John Edward ANDERSON, of the New Zealand Public Works Department, holds his commission in the Royal Engineers, and has been for a couple of months at the Instruction Headquarters at Chatham, and later at the Royal Engineers training depot at Aldershot, where he was one of the reserve officers for casualties. A week ago Lieutenant Anderson was granted a few days leave to recuperate after an attack of measles, but was recalled on Thursday last under orders for embarkation.

Mr Stuart REID, the Dunedin artist, who is in the Scottish Horse, a cavalry regiment raised by Lord Tullibardine, has now been made a sergeant.

Lieutenant William Thorne Wilmot CHING, son of the late Mr Thomas Ching, of Remuera, Auckland, is at the front with the Royal Field Artillery.

Mr Ernest Albert BELCHER, late head master of Christ's College, Christchurch, is in the 9th Service Battalion of the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry.

Miss Mary Daphne WERRY, late of Wellington is in the Inquiry Department for Wounded and Missing of the British Red Cross Society in Paris.

OTAGO DAILY TIMES, ISSUE 16420, 26 JUNE 1915
The recent death in action of Lieutenant John Hugh ALLEN was referred to in the House today, when Sir Joseph Ward submitted a motion expressing sincere sympathy with the Hon. J Allen and his wife and family on the death at the front of their distinguished son and relative - an officer of the Imperial Army, who had died fighting for the King and the Empire. In moving the motion, Sir Joseph Ward said that it was perhaps fitting that he, as Leader of the Opposition, should move such a motion. There were times when the asperities of political life were somewhat bitter, and party feeling ran high, but under conditions such as the present they were brought together by feelings of sympathy, and it seemed to him proper that they should recognise the fall of a son of a Minister of the Crown at a time when a great war was raging...

Sergeant-major ROBERTS [?], who is attached to the Mechanical Transport section of the Union Forces in German South-west Africa is an Aucklander. He left New Zealand with the Seventh Contingent to take part in the Boer War, and has resided in South Africa ever since. When the rebellion occurred he joined the Union Forces as a motor-cycle despatch rider.

AUCKLAND STAR, VOLUME XLVI, ISSUE 153, 29 JUNE 1915
Temporary-Captain George Alexander Maclean BUCKLEY, late of Ashburton, has been transferred from his old regiment, the 12th Hampshires, to command a battalion and to be Temporary-Lieutenant-Colonel of the 7th Leinsters. Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs. Buckley have lived for some years in England at The Hall, Worth, Sussex.

Mr. Alan Le Grand CAMPBELL has obtained a commission in the 3rd Reserve Battalion of the Highland Light Infantry and is at Gosport.

Mr. Selwyn JOYCE, of Christchurch, who arrived here recently from New York, has got a commission in the Royal Bucks Hussars.

Dr. Fife SLATER, of Kaikoura, who is in the R.A.M.C., left for Egypt yesterday.

Lieutenant Dr. William Stephen BAIRD is with the 7th Division in France.

Mr. George Alastair Sinclair THOMSON, of Geraldine, is in the 3rd Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and is just now at Abbey Wood in Kent.

Sergeant Cecil MacGregor TREWBY, of Gisborne. who is in the 14th Battalion of the King's Royal Rifle Corps, is on his way to the Dardanelles.

Mr. Charles Loudon ST HILL, of Hawera, who went through the South African War, is applying for a commission in the Imperial Army.

Mr. Peter CLARKE, late of Temuka, and now assistant to Dr. Mackintosh Bell, late of New Zealand, in Ontario, has obtained a commission in the Wiltshire Regiment.

Captain Fraser, son of Captain Fraser, of the Stormbird, and formerly in the railway service in Wellington, who went through the South African War with the Fifth Contingent, leaves for the front almost immediately.

Lieutenant Alec Hallenstein HYAMS, 6th Royal Fusiliers, (attached to the 3rd) who was killed in action on May 3rd, was the son of Mr. Frank Hyams, of The Old Home, Eastergate, Sussex, formerly of Dunedin, and for many years a member of the Otago Hussars, and grandson of the late Mr. Bendix Hallenstein, of Messrs. Hallenstein Bros., of New Zealand.

Mr. Cecil Frederick George HUMPHRIES, who won the Distinguished Conduct Medal, and was promoted to sergeant on the field, has been given a commission in the Manchesters.

Mr. HANNA, son of the Auckland solicitor, is applying for a commission in the Imperial Army.

Mr. Percival Henry Crespigny PIRANI, son of Mr. Fred Pirani, M.P., is a lieutenant in the M.T. Armv Service Corps, and is at present at Park Royal.

Major and Mrs. Frak Berners KNYVETT, of Auckland, have just arrived in London. The former has seen some severe fighting in German East Africa, and has been severely wounded in the thigh and hand.

AUCKLAND STAR, VOLUME XLVI, ISSUE 153, 29 JUNE 1915
Dr. Louis Edward BARNETT, the well known Dunedin surgeon, who arrived by the Orsova last month, has been assured by the War Office authorities that he will shortly be appointed surgeon to an Overseas Hospital, but in the meantime he has been given temporary duty at the Colchester Military Hospital. His eldest son, Mr. Geoffrey Michael Fulton BARNETT, is with the New Zealand Field Ambulance at the Dardanelles, and his second son Mr. Ralph Edward Fulton BARNETT, has obtained a commission as second lieutenant in the 13th Batt. Lancashire Fusiliers, and is at present undergoing training at Oxford.

Mr. Edmund Graham BASKETT of Auckland, who was for three years metallurgist at the gold mines of South Africa and Rhodesia, was last year transferred as chief metallurgist to a mine on the Gold Coast. He is at present in England on holiday leave, and has definitely decided to resign his post and join the forces for the front during the war. He expects to get a commission immediately. [UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919 Name: Edmund Graham Baskett Death Date: 27 Oct 1918 Rank: Captain (T) Regiment: West African Frontier Force Battalion: Battalion Not Shown Type of Casualty: Died Comments: Gen List Att Nigerian

Mrs. Edwin Nelson HOBSON (nee Miss Rita Mary SIMPSON, of Wellington) whose husband has joined the Howitzer Brigade, is now qualifying for Red Cross work.

Two young Aucklanders, Messrs. MACKAY and HANNA, son of the Auckland solicitor, are applying for commissions in the Imperial Army.

Among those who went down on the Lusitania was Miss Eleanor CHARLES, of Auckland, who was coming over from New York to offer her services for the war. Four years ago she entered the Vancouver General Hospital, and was awarded a gold medal for topping the list in her examination. From there she took charge of a hospital in Fort George (B.C.), and later went to New York to gain further experience. Her sister, Miss Isobel CHARLES, has been working at the Canning Town Women's Settlement since her arrival in England four years ago and is at present staying with friends at Seven Kings, Essex.[Appear to be daughters of Benjamin and Margaret CHARLES] [ALEXANDRA HERALD AND CENTRAL OTAGO GAZETTE, ISSUE 983, 16 JUNE 1915 CHARLES - Drowned on the ss Lusitania, Eleanor CHARLES, sister of Mrs John [Elizabeth] Wilson, Lauder and Joseph Charles, Mataura.]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3198, 30 JUNE 1915
On the 25th inst, Dr Ronald Graeme Scott ORBELL, of Oamaru, received advice that he had been accepted for military service. Dr Orbell is a member of a highly-esteemed and patriotic Otago family (says the North Otago Times). His two brothers Major Henry Scott ORBELL, the brilliant cavalry officer who went with the New Zealand Main Expeditionary Force, and Second-lieutenant Ivan Douglas Scott ORBELL have long been in the fighting line. Lieutenant Orbell, who belongs to the Seventh Royal Fusiliers, is, unfortunately missing, and his relatives have grave fears for his safety. Major Orbell has seen active service before, having been in the First, Third, and Fifth New Zealand Contingents which went to South Africa.

SUN, VOLUME II, ISSUE 434, 1 JULY 1915
Miss Elizabeth McMULLIN, of Dunedin, who arrived on April 19 to offer her services as a nurse, is at present staying at 13 Lakehouse Road, Wanstead, London.

TARANAKI DAILY NEWS, 2 JULY 1915
Mr Herbert Stenbrett HURLE, a New Plymouth boy, who joined the Public Schools Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, as obtained a commission as second-lieutenant in the 5th Middlesex Special Reserve.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XL, ISSUE 9085, 2 JULY 1915
Captain Alan Ernest CAIN, formerly of the Union Company's collier Kaitangata, who left for London as fourth officer of the Corinthic, to join the Royal Naval Reserve, has been undergoing gunnery training at the Devon port Naval Barracks, England.

Advice has been received by Colonel G. F. C. Campbell, Coast Defence Commander that his son, Alan Le Grand CAMPBELL, has received his commission in the Highland Light Infantry after four months training in the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and has been transferred to his regiment. Lieutenant Campbell was educated at the Wanganui College, and though only eighteen years of age he left New Zealand at the outbreak of the war, having been nominated by His Excellency the Governor for admission to Sandhurst.

MANAWATU STANDARD, VOLUME XLI, ISSUE 10112, 2 JULY 1915
Word has been received in Palmerston North that Staff Sergeant-Major Charles Legge NICHOLLS, of the 5th (Royal Irish) Lancers, has been granted a lieutenant's commission in the Imperial Army. Sergeant-Major Nicholls was one of the N.C.O.'s on loan to the New Zealand Defence Department by the British Army, and was stationed in Palmerston North for over three years as Regimental Sergeant-Major of the 6th Mounted Rifles. He left New Zealand with the Wellington Mounted Rifles of the Main Expeditionary Force. Mrs Nicholls has resided in Palmerston North since her husband's departure.

PRESS, VOLUME LI, ISSUE 15321, 3 JULY 1915
Major Charles SHAWE (Headquarters Staff, admitted to hospital) is an Imperial Army officer attached to the New Zealand forces, he being on the Reserve of Officers' Rifle Brigade (Prince Consort's Own). He came to New Zealand as military secretary to his Excellency the Governor. With the despatch of the Main Expeditionary Force to Egypt, he was appointed commander of the general base depot.

DOMINION, VOLUME 8, ISSUE 2507, 7 JULY 1915
Sergeant James OLIPHANT, 3rd Auckland Company, New Zealand Expeditionary Force, who has received a commission as lieutenant in the Imperial Army, was in Egypt awaiting orders when the last mail left.

SUN, VOLUME II, ISSUE 443, 12 JULY 1915
Lieutenant William Edward BALCOMBE-BROWN, Royal Field Artillery, who was killed in France by a shell was a New Zealander. He was the eldest son of Mr E. B. Brown, barrister and solicitor, formerly of Wellington, and was born in Wellington about 23 years ago. When the war broke out he was at Oriel College, Oxford, with his brother, Rainsford Brown. Both brothers enlisted, and it was through the services of the late Earl Roberts, to whom their mother was related that they secured commissions in the Imperial Army. Rainsford Brown is a lieutenant in the Royal Flying Corps.

DOMINION, VOLUME 8, ISSUE 2515, 17 JULY 1915
Mr. Rudolph Friedlander, of Ashburton has received a cable message to the effect that his son Dr. Hugo R. FRIEDLANDER, has received instructions to proceed to the front in France. Dr. Friedlander has been at Farnham Camp since the outbreak of the war. Mr. Otto A. Friedlander, the other son of Mr. Rudolph Friedlander, is at the Dardanelles, attached to No. 1 Company of the Field Engineers.

Mr. William Spiers GLENN, of Wanganui, the All Black footballer, who has decided to offer his services for military work, has decided to go to England and apply for a commission. With Mrs Glenn he leaves shortly by the direct steamer.

Yesterday Mr. and Mrs. John Gallie received a cablegram from London from their son, Mr. Victor James GALLIE, to the effect that he had received a commission as a lieutenant in the Royal Field Artillery. Mr. Gallie served for four years as sergeant in the Wellington College Cadets, and subsequently in D Battery for a similar period, at the close of which he held rank as sergeant. Before his departure from New Zealand Mr. Gallie was connected with the Union Bank.

The following past and present members of the Auckland Rowing Club have joined the ... Imperial Army for active service - Lieutenant Guy FETHERSTON, Lieutenant J. HELLABY, Lieutenant R S HELLABY, Lieutenant F. HELLABY, Lieutenant Leo MYERS.

MANAWATU STANDARD, VOLUME XLI, ISSUE 10132, 26 JULY 1915
On Saturday Mr Allan Carman KEEBLE, of Fitzherbert, left Wellington for London, it being his intention to volunteer for service with the Imperial Army operating in France.

Mr Robert Alexander WILSON, for many years a traveller for Messrs A. Cowan and Sons, Ltd., and well-known throughout New Zealand, who left the Dominion for England some few months ago, has enlisted with the London Scottish.

LAKE WAKATIP MAIL, ISSUE 3137, 27 JULY 1915
Messrs Vincent Aubrey WARD and Gladstone William WARD, sons of Sir Joseph Ward, have both received commissions in the Imperial Army after passing the necessary examinations.

SUN, VOLUME II, ISSUE 461, 2 AUGUST 1915
Dr Arthur Ernest MARSACK, of Auckland, who left for London early this year, has received a commission as captain in the Royal Army Medical Corps.

Mr Ernest DENTON, late of Christchurch and Invercargill, who installed the Diesel oil engines on H.M.S. Queen Elizabeth, has now received a commission in the Royal Navy Reserve, and is going on active service.

Mr George Ernest Oswald FENWICK, F.R.C.S., Auckland (son of Mr George Fenwick, of the Otago Daily Times), who recently offered his services abroad in the R.A.M.C., has received notice that he has been accepted. He will leave New Zealand early this month with a commission as captain. The Prime Minister has received a cable message from the High Commissioner, stating that Lieutenant-Commander Bernard FREYBERG, D.S.0., Hood Battalion, 2nd Royal Naval Brigade, who I was reported as joining his unit in June last, has been again reported wounded on July 20. Lieut. Commander Freyberg has now been wounded four times.

GREYMOUTH EVENING STAR, 4 AUGUST 1915
An exchange says Captain William Thomas BECK, formerly district storekeeper at the Defence store at Mount Eden, who left New Zealand with the main body of the Expeditionary Force as deputy assistant director of ordinance, with the honorary title of captain, has received his full commission as captain in the Imperial Army. He is attached to the headquarters staff. Mr Beck is a son of Mrs R. Beck (senr.), of Wellington, formerly of Kanieri.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3203, 4 AUGUST 1915
Information is to hand that Dr Roland Arthur Hertslet FULTON, the New Zealand University travelling scholar in medicine, has received an appointment as lieutenant in the R.A.M.C., and has been temporarily attached to the Seamen's Hospital at Greenwich, England. He was to proceed to Aldershot for military training on June 28.

Major Charles Coley CHOYCE, M.D., F.R.C.S., who was appointed to command the 19th General Hospital attached to the British Army, has now been promoted to the rank of colonel. No definite information as to where he is stationed has been received but it is thought that he is in the vicinity of the Dardanelles. NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XL, ISSUE 9119, 11 AUGUST 1915
Captain GREEN, formerly of the Tokomaru, which was torpedoes and sunk by a German submarine, has taken command of the Kumara, in place of Captain LEWIS, now master of the Pakeha.

SUN, VOLUME II, ISSUE 469, 11 AUGUST 1915
Dr Ebenezer TEICHELMANN, of Hokitika, has been accepted for service in the Royal Army Medical Corps. He leaves for England next week.

Yesterday afternoon the Hon. Dr McNab received a cable message from his brother, Private Alexander McNAB who is training with the Royal Fusiliers on Salisbury Plains, England, congratulating him on his inclusion in the National government. Private McNab was an officer in the British Forces in the Boer War, and after the outbreak of the present war he stated that he had already seen something of an officer's life on active service, and wished to see how a private fared, and he enlisted.

Mr Percival Henry Crespigny PIRANI, who left New Zealand early in the year to seek a commission in the Imperial Army, has been successful in gaining a lieutenancy in the mounted division of the Army Service Corps. Writing to his mother, Mrs M. Berry-Pirani, of Wellington, on June 6, Lieutenant Pirani states that he was with the 3rd Army at Aldershot, ready to go abroad. He had already been out with a draft, and expected to go permanently in a few days. He had just then experienced a Zeppelin air raid, but no damage was done beyond scaring people. Mrs Berry-Pirani's second son writes from the trenches in Gallipoli (on a post card made of a piece of cardboard box), stating that he is having a fine time, plenty of work, and "getting quite fat."

WAIRARAPA DAILY TIMES, VOLUME LXIX, ISSUE 14358, 13 AUGUST 1915
Cable advice received in Christchurch yesterday from the Secretary of the War Office, London, stated that 2nd Lieutenant Henry Eugene (Harry) VOYCE, of the Worcester Regiment, had been reported missing since August 6th. Lieutenant Voyce is the eldest son of the late T. G. Voyce, of Christchurch, and was one of the six members of the New Zealand main expeditionary force who received commissions in the Imperial Army. He was at one time officer commanding No. 79 Sydenham Cadets, and subsequently going to Wellington, he was attached to the Wellington Technical College Cadets.

AUCKLAND STAR, VOLUME XLVI, ISSUE 192, 13 AUGUST 1915
Captain Arthur Cunliffe Bernard CRITCHLEY-SALMONSEN,(Canterbury Battalion) wounded, is 27 years of age and was an English army officer appointed to the New Zealand Defence Staff when the compulsory service scheme came into operation. He was born at Torquay, Devonshire, and joined the Imperial Army in 1905 after passing through the Military School at Sandhurst, and being attached to the Royal Munster Fusiliers. He served at Dover and at Limerick, acting for three years as scout officer and assistant adjutant. Then he was stationed at Salisbury Plains as galloper to General Drummond, and also as brigade scout officer with General Godley. He was appointed by the latter to the New Zealand Defence Staff in 1911, and was posted to the Canterbury district as brigade major and inspector in infantry training. Captain Critchley Salmonson was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for splendid service in trench operations at Gallipoli.

SUN, VOLUME II, ISSUE 472, 14 AUGUST 1915
Cable advice received in Christchurch yesterday from the Secretary of the War Office, London, stated that Second Lieutenant, Henry Eugene (Harry) VOYCE, of the Worcester Regiment, had been reported missing since August 6. This morning a cable stated that he had been killed in action. Lieutenant Voyce is the elder son of the late Mr T. G. Voyce of this city, and was one of the six members of the New Zealand Main Expeditionary Force who received a commission in the Imperial Army. When the Main Expeditionary Force left Egypt for the Dardanelles. Lieutenant Voyce remained in Egypt, to attend a class of instruction before being drafted into his regiment, until July 7, when he left to join his regiment (Worcesters) at Gallipoli. He was at one time officer commanding the No 79 Senior Sydenham Cadets. Subsequently, going to Wellington, he was attached to the Technical College Cadets there.

AUCKLAND STAR, VOLUME XLVI, ISSUE 197, 19 AUGUST 1915
Mr Alfred COURT left last night en route for England to offer his services to the Imperial Government...

Mr William Read, of Pencarrow Avenue, Mount Eden, has received information that his son Lawrence William READ, who went away with the Second Reinforcements in December last as a private in the the 34th Auckland Regiment has been given a commission in the Imperial army, and has just left for the Dardanelles in charge of a reinforcement draft. Lieutenant Read who was formerly in the employ of the United Insurance Co., went through a special course of instruction in Egypt, and gained nearly 80 per cent in the examination for his commission. He was 21 years of age last month.

EVENING POST, VOLUME XC, ISSUE 43, 19 AUGUST 1915
Mr. J. Stevenson, of the Hansard staff, has received advice that his son Sergeant John Francis Barr STEVENSON, who was selected from the New Zealand Expeditionary Force to join the Imperial Army has passed his examinations at the training college, Egypt, and has left there for Gallipoli with an Indian regiment as second lieutenant. Lieutenant Stevenson was born in Wellington twenty-one years ago and was educated at the Terrace School and Wellington College. He also studied in Victoria College and served articles with Messrs. Izard and Weston, solicitors, Wellington. He was with that firm when he left for the front with the Main Force.

NEW ZEALAND HERALD, VOLUME LII, ISSUE 16004, 24 AUGUST 1915
Amongst the New Zealand soldiers at present in London is Lieutenant Cuthbert T. MACLEAN, of the Royal Fusiliers and the Royal Flying Corps, who has been sent Home for treatment fur an injury to his knee, caused by a fall at the front. The knee is the same one that was injured by shrapnel some months ago. Lieutenant MacLean has lately been flying every day, usually two flights a day reconnoitering, bomb-dropping, and observing for artillery. Three times recently he has had to descend, owing to the German artillery making direct hits on his machine, and on several occasions he has had skirmishes in the air with German machines. The superiority of the British airmen in these duels is largely due to the construction of our machines, which gives a very wide arc of fire for our machine guns, as compared with those of the Germans. Lieutenant MacLean will probably return to the front early in August.

Lieutenant Ernest Richard LEARY, of Auckland is a New Zealand officer who has come to London to try and get into the Imperial Army. Returning to the Dominion from Samoa, he decided to come to London and try his luck here.

Mr. Edmund G. BASKETT of Auckland. who arrived in London from the Gold Coast in May on a holiday visit, and who offered his services to the War Office has been given a commission in the 9th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, and has joined his regiment at Portsmouth. Mr. James Dalton DINNEEN, R.A., of Auckland who was appointed lieutenant in the Royal Flying Corps, and qualified as a pilot, has, unfortunately, had to relinquish his commission, owing to defective eyesight. He hopes to get into another branch of the service.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3206, 25 AUGUST 1915
A telegram has been received containing the following list of casualties among the Imperial ratings serving with H.M.S. Pyramus, as a result of operation's on August 14: - Killed: James FOORD (stoker), formerly of H.M.S. Torch. Wounded: G. H. MOCKLER (A.B.), Robert BENEWITH (A.B.), and Frederick HIGGINSON (Private). The only casualty among New Zealand ratings was Albert SOPOR, A.B., slightly wounded.

FREE LANCE, VOLUME XV, ISSUE 791, 27 AUGUST 1915
Miss Violet PAGET (Mrs. Hugh Buckler) is having a sad time just now. Her husband, who is an officer in the Imperial Army, is somewhere on active service, and recently she has had reason for very great anxiety. Until it is known what regiments were on the troopship which was sunk last week, many homes all over the Empire will be most sadly anxious. [Is this Hugh Chilman BUCKLER and Violet Roderica Elaine - Lieutenant Hugh Chilman BUCKLER The Worcestershire Regiment. South African Marriage Entries - BUCKLER Hugh Chilman O'HALLORAN Violet Frederica Elaine 02 Mar 1905 TVL, Jo'burg, St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Marriages 1895-1906 435 ]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3207, 1 SEPTEMBER 1915
The incidents connected with the death of Lieutenant John Hugh ALLEN are described in a letter received by the Hon. J. Allen (Minister of Defence) from an officer of high rank. The mixed force with which the Essex Regiment was associated got into a difficult position on June 6 owing to the centre having got too far forward. Some of the troops were bombed out of an advanced trench, and Lieut. Allen and another officer acted "most gallantly" in attempting to check the retreat. They succeeded, but they had to expose themselves freely, and the plucky act cost Lieut. Allen his life. "I am pleased to be able to tell you that your son died doing a very gallant act, which entailed almost certain death," writes the officer. "To do as he did required a cool head and a brave heart." The Defence Minister (the Hon. J. Allen) has been making inquiries about the burial place of his son (Lieutenant J. H. Allen), and has been informed that his grave has been located, and an officer has undertaken to see that the spot shall be marked with a wooden cross.

A private cable message received in Wellington states that Mr Lawrence Allman MARCHANT [ALLMAN-MARCHANT], youngest son of Mr J. W. A. Marchant, ex-Surveyor-general, has received a commission in the Royal Irish Fusiliers. Mr Marchant, who was born and educated in Wellington, was in the Expeditionary Force in Samoa, and on returning he joined the Ocean Accident Insurance Company's staff in this city. He left Wellington for London by the Turakina on June 15.

Sergeant Brookes, in charge of the Bluff Police Station, has received advice that his eldest son (Private Wallace Abernethy BROOKES), 28 years of age, has been missing in Flanders since January. Private Brookes was a member of the Scots Guards Regiment, having been called to the colours from his home in New South Wales. Cablegrams in January announced that the Scots Guards were badly cut up in action, and it was evidently in this action that Private Brookes was either killed or taken prisoner.

Dr William Cochran BURNS of Timaru has obtained a commission at lieutenant in the R.A.M.C., and is going to Aldershot.

In New Zealand sincere sympathy will be felt for Sir Charles and Lady CAMPBELL, whose eldest son was killed in action in Flanders on May 13, at the age of 35. Major William Robinson CAMPBELL, D.S.O., 14th (King's) Hussars, was attached to the 10th Hussars from November last until within five days of his death, when he was transferred to the North Somerset Yeomanry as second in command. His mother, Lady Campbell, of Cheviot Hills, New Zealand, was formerly Miss Robinson, daughter of the Hon. W. Robinson, M.L.C. Major Campbell leaves a widow. [CWGC - Eldest son of the late Sir Charles R. Campbell, 11th Bart., of Auchinbreck, and Lady Campbell, of Cheviot Hills, New Zealand; husband of Maud Kathleen Campbell, of 92, Mount St., London, W.I.]

Lieutenant George Randall Fysh SAYLE, of the R.F.A., died on May 10 near Ypres, from wounds received the previous day. He saw active service in South Africa with the 6th New Zealand Mounted Rifles, receiving the Queen's medal and five clasps. When war broke out he was in the Federated Malay States, engaged in rubber planting. Returning to England, he obtained a commission and went to the front in March. [CWGC - Son of Bordman Bromhead Dalton Sayle and Charlotte Mary Sayle, of High Bank, Roydon, Essex, England. Born at Hong Kong, China. Served in South African Campaign with New Zealand Mounted Rifles. Resided in Borneo, and Malay States; but returned home to join up, November 1914.]

Dr George Martin CHAPMAN, son of Mr Justice Chapman. Dunedin, had been at the front for some months, and in January he received a decoration from the Boulogne Municipality for saving life on the sands there. After this he was attached to the Dragoon Guards in the field, and it was while tending a wounded soldier in the trenches that he was blown to pieces by a bursting shell. [CWGC - Second son of the Hon. Frederick Revans Chapman, Judge of the Supreme Court of New Zealand, and Clara Jane Chapman, his wife. M.B. (Cambs.), M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. (Lond.). Educated at Waitaki Boys' High School, Otago University, Caius College, Cambridge, and the London Hospital where he filled successively all the offices of the Junior Medical Staff. Gained his Blue for football and half Blue for boxing at Cambridge. Joined the R.A.M.C. at outbreak of War. Decorated with Gold Medal "Pour Courage et Devouement" (France) in Dec., 1914, for saving life in a rough sea off Boulogne.

Private Arthur George SPIERS [SPIER], 4th Reserve Battalion, Coldstream Guards, belongs to Dannevirke. He arrived in England about five months ago, and within a week he had joined this famous regiment. Probably in about two months time he will be sent to France. He thinks of returning ultimately to New Zealand.

Dr Arthur Ernest MARSACK (Auckland), who recently arrived in London with Mrs Marsack and their family, has offered his services to the War Office. He contemplates a course of work at various London hospitals before returning to New Zealand.

Captain Charles Gordon ARMOUR (late of Dunedin) is in the 24th Battalion, Victoria Rifles, Montreal, of the Canadian Expeditionary Force. He arrived at Plymouth in the middle of May and is now in camp at Shorncliffe, Kent. He expects to remain there for a month or six weeks taking a course of special musketry training; then his battalion will probably go into the trenches in France or Belgium. Captain Armour has made his home in Montreal for the past few years. While here he hopes to take flying trips to Wales and Scotland to visit relatives.

In less than a fortnight after landing Mr Raymond Gilbert WHITE (Wairoa) was in camp with the Army Service Corps in which he obtained a commission. He is attached to the 20th Divisional Train, Major-general R. H. Davies's command. He travelled by way of Vancouver and New York with Mrs White and their two sons.

Mr William Angus DOUGLAS (Waikari) has a commission in the Cameronians Scottish Rifles 10th Battalion, now in camp at Chiseldon. Mr Douglas recently arrived from New Zealand.

Mr Clive Franklyn COLLETT, formerly of Messrs Turnbull and Jones, of Wellington, is now a lieutenant in the Royal Flying Corps, having obtained his aviator's certificate in almost record time. Mr Collett left New Zealand with the first transports on October 16, and came on to England, reaching here on December 24. His idea was to take up aviation, and he won his Royal Aero Club aviator's certificate on January 29 at Hendon. During his month at Hendon he worked as a pupil with the Aircraft Manufacturing Company in order to gain experience, but the weather was so bad for flying that no opportunity occurred to venture in the air until January 29. He then flew for three hours, and showed considerable aptitude in the management of the machine. He was called to the Flying Corps on February 17, and after further training at the military grounds at Brooklyn and Netheravon he was posted as flight-lieutenant on March 25. He is now under orders to proceed abroad. Lieutenant Collett says that Lieutenant Hammond, the New Zealand flying man, is on service somewhere.

Miss Joan SUNDERLAND (Poverty Bay) has fully qualified as a Red Cross worker, and until last week she held an important post as organising head of a convalescent home for French soldiers at Puys, near Dieppe. She was assisted by other Red Cross workers and by a staff of French orderlies. In three months no fewer than 400 men passed through the home. Miss Sunderland has now been transferred to a military hospital at Haut-Marne, which is organised and managed by surgeons and nurses from England. Her brother, Mr Marmaduke Langdale SUNDERLAND ('Duke') after four months in King Edward's Horse, obtained a commission in the Army Service Corps, and is now second lieutenant, Motor Transport Division; he expects to go to the front shortly. Mr Geoffrey SUNDERLAND, when war broke out, was recalled from Wells Theological College to his squadron in King Edward's Horse, and is now at the front; he is lance-sergeant, 4th Troop, A Squadron.

Corporal Thomas Francis NORTHCOTE and Trooper Richard Ernest Nowell TWOPENY, King Edward's Horse, have been given commissions in that regiment. It was inspected by the King at Windsor a few days ago.

Dr Alexander Manson Moncrieff FINLAYSON (Otago), who came back from Rangoon last month, has a commission in the 10th South Lancashire Regiment, now at Liverpool. He expects to leave for the front immediately.

2nd Lieutenant David Mitchell TOMLINSON, 13th Royal Scots (Service Battalion) has been promoted lieutenant.

Mr Harold William JENNINGS (New Plymouth), who Joined the London Scottish a little while ago, now has a commission in the R.F.A., 108th Brigade, stationed at West Worthing. He has recently been through a course at the school of instruction at Salisbury.

Gunner Joseph Ward RUTLEDGE (Christchurch) 7th Reserve Battalion R.F.A., has received a commission in that regiment. Lieutenant Rutledge is an ex-student of Christ's College.

Dr Lewis Edward BARNETT, F.R.C.S., a recent arrival from Dunedin, is gazetted temp captain R.A.M.C.

Second Lieutenant Ian Calcutt FINDLAY, York and Lancaster Regiment, is confirmed in his rank. He has been in the trenches for more than a month past.

Miss Dora GILL (Christchurch) who came to England to offer her services to the War Office for nursing the wounded, has been appointed sister under Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service in the war hospital at Bristol. It is not unlikely that before long she will be transferred to one of the transports.

Mrs Lilian Adeline EMERSON, wife of the late Lieutenant Emerson, whose death has just been announced with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, went out to Egypt a few weeks ago for duty under the War Office. Mrs Emerson, who is a qualified nurse, was attached for a while to the military hospital at Millbank.

Miss Kate Elizabeth BENJAMIN (Christchurch) has been accepted by the War Office for Home nursing service, and has been appointed to the Beaufort War Hospital at Bristol. She took up her duties on June 5. Later she may be transferred for service at the front.

Mr Harold Winstone BUTTERWORTH (Auckland) hopes to join the Royal Flying Corps. He expects to remain until the end of the war.

Lieutenant Cuthbert Trelawder MACLEAN, Royal Flying Corps, is at present acting as adjutant to No. 6 Squadron, 2nd Wing, R.F.C. He is among the airmen who cross the German lines for reconnaissance or bomb-dropping once or twice daily, being shelled every time. Twice his machine has been hit, once slightly and once more seriously, as it met with a badly damaged wing. Twice also this young New Zealander has been sent on bomb-dropping expeditions, once dropping 13 bombs and again seven, each time right in the middle of a German camp.

Lieutenant Alan [Allan] MacDOUGALL, 22nd Royal Fusiliers (Kensington), has been promoted captain. He is thus the first New Zealander to have attained this honour in the course of a few months.

Lieutenant James Robert DENNISTOUN (Canterbury) is at Antrim Castle. Ireland, with the North Irish Horse. The Castle is the seat of Lord Massereene and Ferrard. From what one hears this young New Zealander may consider himself very fortunate to be drafted to a cavalry regiment, in which vacancies at the present are very few. The North Irish Horse will probably be sent to France in a few months.

Dr Leslie Fraser Elioart JEFFCOAT (Dunedin) is to-day gazetted lieutenant in the R.A.M.C.

Mr Ashton James [Asshelton James] LEVER-NAYLOR (Dunedin and Wellington) obtained leave from the Union Steam Ship Company (he was chief officer of the Romata)to come Home for the purpose of joining the Royal Naval Division. He is in communication with the Admiralty.

Dr Agnes BENNETT (Wellington), who recently left New Zealand to offer herself for war service, has decided to remain in Egypt.

Captain Adair Douglas BLYTH (Masterton) is just concluding three weeks sick leave, and returns to Chelmsford this week to rejoin his regiment, the 2nd 5th Gloucestershire. Captain Blyth obtained his commission last September, and previous to that he was adjutant of the National Reserve in Cheltenham, where he has resided since leaving New Zealand in 1908.

2nd Lieutenant James Acland DUNN is serving with the 4th Battery R.D.F. He is a son of Mr C. A. Dunn, of Peel Forest.

Private Arthur Spence CHAMPTALOUP (Auckland) is serving in France with the A.S.C., attached to the 3rd Cavalry Division.

Captain Charles NELSON, D.S.O, 15th Hussars, is mentioned in the list of wounded under date May 23. He entered the army in 1900, receiving his first promotion three years later and his captaincy in 1908. From 1907 to 1909 he was employed with the New Zealand forces. Captain Nelson obtained his D.S.O. last February being mentioned in Sir John French's despatches.

2nd Lieutenant Ronald GRAY, R.F.A. (Wellington), has been invalided to London suffering from a shrapnel wound in the leg.

The name of Captain Willoughby Clive GARSIA, Hampshire Regiment, appears in a late casualty list. He has been at the front since August, and came uninjured through the retreat from Mons. He is a son of Captain Garsia, late of Canterbury.

DOMINION, VOLUME 8, ISSUE 2555, 1 SEPTEMBER 1915
Mr Robert HANNAH, jun., who went to Samoa with the first Expeditionary Force, and later left for England with a view to joining the Imperial Army received a commission in the Royal Field Artillery three days after reaching London.

OTAGO DAILY TIMES, ISSUE 16477, 1 SEPTEMBER 1915
Amongst the New Zealand soldiers at present in London is Lieutenant (Rev.) Cuthbert Trelawder MACLEAN, of the Royal Fusiliers and the Royal Flying Corps, who has been sent Home for treatment for an injury to his knee, caused by a fall at the front. The knee is the same one that was injured by shrapnel some months ago. Lieutenant Maclean has lately been flying every day, usually two flights a day, reconnoitering, bomb-dropping, and observing for artillery. Three times recently he has had to descend owing to the German artillery making direct hits on his machine, and on several occasions he has had skirmishes in the air with German machines. The superiority of the British airmen in those duels is largely due to the construction of our machines, which gives a very wide arc of fire for our machine guns as compared with those of the Germans. Lieutenant Maclean will probably return to the front early in August.

Lieutenant Bertram Ernest WRIGHT, R.A.M.C. (Otago), is attached to No. 9 Stationary Hospital in France, and Lieutenant Maxwell RAMSAY (Dunedin) to No. 6 Stationary.

Lieutenant Cyril James Anthony GRIFFIN (Auckland and Christchurch), who has been in the fighting line since the war began, for some time with the Dragoon Guards, is now attached to No. 1 General Hospital, near Havre.

Lieutenant Ernest Richard LEARY (Auckland) is a New Zealand officer who has come to London to try to get into the Imperial Army. Returning to the dominion from Samoa, and finding there were no vacancies in the N.Z.E.F. for Europe, he decided to come to London and try his luck here.

Second Lieutenant Frederick Langloh DONKIN (Southland), Royal Artillery, has been promoted full lieutenant. On arrival in England early in the year he applied for admission to the Royal Flying Corps.

The King has conferred upon Commander Albert Ernest DUNN, R.N.R., the officers decoration. He was in charge of the Gazelle, a trawler, mine-sweeping in the North Sea, and had swept over 2000 miles in a certain area until he left for the Mediterranean three months ago. Commander Dunn is well known in New Zealand, having been chief officer of the Tongariro and Rotorua, and captain of the Rakaia. Subsequently he was in London, having been appointed assistant marine superintendent of the New Zealand Shipping Company. Last October he was appointed to special Admiralty duty, and was given charge of the Gazelle in the following month. Quite recently he was congratulated by Vice-admiral de Robeck, Commanding the fleet at the Dardanelles, upon his successful mine-laying off Smyrna. The decoration just bestowed is the long service medal.

Mr C. F. JOHNSTON (Wellington), who arrived in England recently and offered his services to the War Office, is this morning gazetted temporary lieutenant, 6th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry. [Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry][Is this Guy Featherston JOHNSTON ?]

Last week Lieutenant John Wilfred FINDLAY (eldest son of Sir J. G. and Lady Findlay) left with his regiment l4th Battalion, the King's Royal Rifles for France. Now all three sons are on active service, Lieutenants James Lloyd Findlay (7th East Surreys) and Ian (York and Lancaster Regiment) having been in the trenches for some considerable time. The latest news is that all three are well.

Mr Edmund Graham BASKETT (Auckland), who arrived in London from the Gold Coast in May on a holiday visit, and who offered his services to the War Office, has been given a commission in the 9th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, and has joined his regiment at Portsmouth. [Died 27 October 1918 attd. Nigeria Regiment, W.A.F.F. Son of the late Nathaniel and Agnes Baskett, of Cambridge, New Zealand, formerly of Eye, Suffolk; husband of Dorothy Mary Baskett, of "Stapleton," Bury Rd., Newmarket.]

Lieutenant Edwin Ballard DALBY, R.N.R., H.M.S. Carmania (Hawke's Bay), who belongs to the New Zealand Shipping Company's service, was called up on the outbreak of war and appointed to the Carmania, and he was on board her at the sinking of the German vessel Cap Trafalgar. Lieutenant Dalby has previously seen considerable service in the navy, and before joining the New Zealand Shipping Company he was on the Pacific Cable Board's vessel, H.M.S. Iris. Last month Lieutenant Dalby was married at St. Pancras Church, London, to Miss M. E. Middleton, M.B., B.S. (Lond.), D.Ph. (Lond.), daughter of Mr Guy Middleton and granddaughter of the late Mr Edmund Plane Middleton, of Hindringham Hall, Norfolk. On account of the war, the marriage was considerably delayed, and when it did take place there was a gloom over the occasion on account of the death in France, of Lieutenant G. F. R. SAYLE, of the 33rd Battery, 33rd Brigade R.F.A. (formerly of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles), cousin of the bridegroom.

Miss Frances Warburton LEE (Hawke's Bay) has offered her services to the War Office. She reached England a week ago.

Mr James Dalton DINEEN [DINNEEN], B.A. (Auckland), who was appointed Lieutenant in the Royal Flying Corps and qualified as a pilot, has, unfortunately, had to relinquish his commission owing to defective eyesight. He hopes to get into another branch of the service.

Mr E. G. HONEY, who was well known on the press in New Zealand, and was afterwards in Melbourne journalism and on the Daily Mail in London, has enlisted as a private in the 20th Battalion (the Middlesex Regiment).

Mr Claude Alan JORDAN (Wellington and Waipukurau) has come to England to offer his Services, probably in a British line regiment.

Lieutenant William Henry JOHNSTON, R.A.M.C., who has been in France with the 1st General Hospital since the first weeks of the war, is home on a fortnight's furlough. Lieutenant Johnston recently got his M.D. for a thesis on frostbite in the campaign.

Mr John CAMPBELL (Wellington), a son of Mr S. Campbell, Karori, is a marine engineer who has been for the last three years in Singapore, and during the latter part of that period he has been chief engineer of the Straits Settlement Government steamer Sea Mew. He was one ot the Volunteers assisting in rounding up the mutineers a few months ago, when the 5th Light Infantry Regiment murdered many Europeans, and he went through some exciting experiences. Subsequently he had the satisfaction of seeing 33 of the murderers shot after being court-marshalled. Mr Campbell has come to London to offer his services for the war, and he hopes ultimately to go back to New Zealand.

Miss Nela CHAPPLE, second daughter of Major W. A. Chapple, R.A.M.C., M.P., has joined Mrs W. H. Cowan's contingent of ladies who have undertaken shell-making at Woolwich.

Major William Allan CHAPPLE, R.A.M.C., M.P. (Wellington), has just returned from the Dardanelles, having made a voyage out on the staff of one of the British hospital ships, and thus seeing another of the sides of the wonderful work of the British arms medical service. For some time he was serving in hospital trains in England; then he commanded the Mount Vernon Hospital at Hampstead. Discussing the care of the wounded from the East, Dr Chapple said he had made a report to the War Office on his observations. In Egypt there was accommodation for 15,000 cases and at Malta for another 7000; and it is intended to add 4000 beds to the Malta equipment. Malta, Alexandria, and Lemnos form a triangle, each side being covered by about two days' steam. It has been the practice for the ships to call at Lemnos and fill up with wounded, and take them down to Alexandria or to Malta, where they are disembarked into the hospitals. Dr Chapple suggests that the ships should fill up at Lemnos, and utilise the voyage to Malta for classifying the cases, so as to ascertain which are suitable for taking on to England and which are so slight that they will heal in Malta, or so bad that they should not be taken any further by sea. They should report by wireless to Malta how many cases they wish to put off there, and Malta should fill up the vacancies in the ship thus created, so that the ship may proceed full to England, thus avoiding all the unnecessary handling and discomfort of embarking and disembarking at one or two ports. The ships are splendidly equipped, and have excellent operating, theatres and every necessary appliance. As a New Zealander whose nationality was not known to most of those with whom he came in contact, Dr Chapple was greatly pleased to find that the New Zealanders are held in the highest esteem by the other troops with whom they operated. They were invariably singled out for praise.

TARANAKI DAILY NEWS, 2 SEPTEMBER 1915
Mr W SWANN, who has been farming on the East Road, Stratford, has sold his farm and is leaving for England, where he intends joining the Imperial army. [1914 E/Roll SWANN, William East Road, Stratford, farmer].

PUKEKOHE & WAIUKU TIMES, VOLUME 4, ISSUE 78, 3 SEPTEMBER 1915
Mrs John Hancock, of Bombay, received word only last week of the death of her son Percy Claude Wilmot HANCOCK, who was in the Imperial Army. He was killed in France in March. Mrs Hancock has two other sons at the Dardanelles.

WANGANUI CHRONICLE, ISSUE 20456, 8 SEPTEMBER 1915
The Wanganui Collegiate School Old Boys, Messrs. Royes Page SHERRIFF, John Davis CANNING (Napier), and Jack Sydney SMITH (Timaru), who recently went home by the Remuera, have been granted commissions in the Imperial Army to serve in the Royal Flying Corps.

STAR, ISSUE 11487, 8 SEPTEMBER 1915
Lieutenant James Frederick GULLIVER-CRADWICK, who went with the Main Expeditionary Force in the First Regiment, Canterbury Infantry, and in Egypt obtained a commission in the Imperial Army, has been posted to the 1st Essex Regiment now at the Dardanelles, and placed in command of a machine gun company.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3208, 8 SEPTEMBER 1915
Mr W. T. Jennings, M.P., has been advised that his son Lieutenant Harold William JENNINGS, of the Imperial Royal Field Artillery Force, was to leave England yesterday and that Sergeant Jennings, of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, is in hospital at Malta, suffering from enteric. Mr Jennings's other son, Edgar, was recently killed in the trenches in Gallipoli by a bomb thrown from one of the Turkish trenches.

At a social in the Dunedin Bowling Club's pavilion on the 1st inst., Mr W J CROFT stated that his son Eric, at the outbreak of the war volunteered for service with the Army Medical Corps, and five days later was in Brussels. Here for a while he was detained with many others by the Germans, but the intervention of the American Consul resulted in Mr Croft's son being sent back to London. From there he went to Ypres, where he was stationed for four months, and during the last three months he has been on medical service in Serbia.

Mr Gladstone WARD, son of Sir Joseph Ward, has been appointed to a commission in the Mechanical Transport Department, Army Service Corps, in England.

A Gisborne boy, Mr Humphrey Francis PARKER, eldest son of Mr F. J. Parker, manager of the Bank of New South Wales, has left his home (says the Poverty Bay Herald) with a view to joining the Maloja at Sydney for London, where it is his intention to enter a school of aviation and to offer his services to the Imperial authorities. The young man, who has proved himself throughout his scholastic career to be one of the district's ablest boys, will carry with him many good wishes, and his future career will be watched with much interest. He distinguished himself by winning a Queen's scholarship at the age of 13 years, gaining 703 marks out 800 marks, and being at the top of 1500 candidates for the whole dominion. After leaving the Gisborne High School he studied at Nelson College, and has just completed a 2 1/2 years course at Canterbury College, where he has boon studying civil engineering. In 1909 at 15 years of age, he secured the maximum number of points in the Government semaphore test. He has also demonstrated his marksmanship by carrying off the Canterbury match at Trentham in March, 1914 scoring 47 points out of 50 at 600 yards. Mr Parker's two other sons are already in training with the Trentham Regiment and the Eighth Reinforcements respectively.

General sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs E. Balcombe Brown, of Wellington, who are now in London (writes our correspondent), on the death of their elder son. Lieutenant William Edward BALCOMBE BROWN [BALCOMBE-BROWN], of the Royal Field Artillery. Lieutenant Balcombe Brown was observing for his battery, when a shell burst over the station and killed him. When war broke out Lieutenant Brown was studying at Oriel, Oxford, where he had got his half-blue for boxing. He at once got his commission, and he had an early experience in Belgium attached to the ammunition column of Sir Henry Rawlinson's division, which landed at Zeebrugge, and made a dash to save Belgium from the advance of the Germans, which led to the battles of Ypres. He was a keen soldier, and looked forward to spending his life in the army.

AUCKLAND STAR, VOLUME XLVI, ISSUE 222, 17 SEPTEMBER 1915
Sergeant Arthur Thomas ATKINS of the Auckland Mounted Machine Gun Section, has left for England where he has received a commission in the Imperial Army.

AUCKLAND STAR, VOLUME XLVI, ISSUE 224, 20 SEPTEMBER 1915
Mr Lancelot Beaumont TODD, the well known football player, and son of Mr John Todd of Otahuhu, has been granted a Lieutenants commission in the Imperial Army.

PUKEKOHE & WAIUKU TIMES, VOLUME 4, ISSUE 86, 22 SEPTEMBER 1915 Mr G THORPE, who is on a business visit to Waiuku in connection with his occupation as an auctioneer, served through the Egyptian campaign as a Sergeant-Major in the Imperial Army, and his bravery in saving a drummer boy's life won him the Distinguished Conduct Medal.

PRESS, VOLUME LI, ISSUE 15391, 23 SEPTEMBER 1915
...Mention might also be made of one or two who have proceeded to England in the hops of enlisting in the Imperial Army, notably Mr Stuart RAMSAY, who was now second Lieutenant in the 8th Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers, Territorials.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3212, 6 OCTOBER 1915
Corporal Philip Henry George BENNET, D.C.M., formerly of the literary staff of the Wairarapa Times, who was recently wounded at the Dardanelles, has received an appointment in the Records Department of the Imperial War Office in London.

Advice has been received in Christchurch that Dr William IRVING, who went Home for war service, has been offered and has accepted, an appointment in the Netley Hospital (1st General Hospital), England. [SUN, VOLUME II, ISSUE 408, 1 JUNE 1915 Dr William IRVING, of Christchurch, will leave for England in a fortnight's time to assist at one of the military hospitals. He is president of the New Zealand branch of the British Medical Association.]

Lieutenant Phillip UREN, son of Mr Uren of Parnell, who left New Zealand as a Trooper with the 11th North Auckland Mounted Rifles, and was later promoted, is now lieutenant in the 1st Lancashire Fusiliers, 86th Brigade, of the famous 29th Division, which was recently badly cut up in the Dardanelle fighting. Writing to his father on August 9, Lieutenant Uren said he was well, though he had lost 16 of his men by the explosion of one shell.

EVENING POST, VOLUME XC, ISSUE 85, 8 OCTOBER 1915
Mr Stuart SEDDON, who served with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in Samoa, will today leave for England, where he proposed to enlist in the Imperial Army.

PRESS, VOLUME LI, ISSUE 15407, 12 OCTOBER 1915
News has been received that Major Bernard HEAD was killed at the Dardanelles on August 12th. He was well known in New Zealand as a climber and explorer in the Southern Alps. He made the first ascent of Mount Aspiring and explored the Valley of the Dart. He was a frequent visitor to Waimate where he had many friends. At the outbreak of the war being in the Dominion, he was attached to the 5th (Wellington) Regiment and went to Samoa with the Expeditionary Force in August 1914. He returned to New Zealand early in 1915 as he was very desirous of rejoining his old regiment, the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He reached the Old Country in April, and appears to have been posted immediately and sent on active service to the Dardanelles. Major Head formerly held a commission in the 2nd Volunteer Battalion, Shropshire Light Infantry. He served with distinction in South Africa, and received mention in despatches, and got the Queen's Medal with three clasps. He was appointed honorary captain in the Army in 1901. He afterwards lived at Ellesmere, Shropshire, and was a keen supporter of Lord Haldane's Territorial scheme. He was promoted to the rank of major, and was second in command of the 5th Battalion of tho Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Major Head was the youngest son of the late Mr Henry Head, of 27 Cornhill, London.

Mrs Voyce has received the following letter giving particulars of the death of her son, Lieutenant Henry Eugene VOYCE. After leaving New Zealand with the Main Expeditionary Force, Lieutenant Voyce received a commission in the Imperial Army, and was attached to 4th Worcestershire Regiment. The letter is as follows: - Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 9th August, 1915. Dear Mrs Voyce - It is with deep regret that I have to tell you that your son was killed in action on the 6th inst. We had a very severe attack to make on a strong Turkish position, under very heavy fire, and your son was killed during the advance. He did his duty gallantly, and is much missed by all ranks. Yours faithfully (signed), C. H. Seton, Major, O.C. 4th Worcestershire Regiment.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3213, 13 OCTOBER 1915
Dr James Robert BOYD, of Mataura, has received a commission in the Royal Army Medical Corps, and will depart for London shortly (says the Ensign). Dr Boyd will leave Mataura on Friday.

News has been received that Lieutenant William Owen Nelson ROUT has been killed in action (says the Nelson Mail). The deceased was 23 years of age. He was studying medicine at Edinburgh University when war broke out, and at once enlisted in Kitchener's army. He was married just before going to the front.

Dr John Pearce WHETTER, of Christchurch, who left for London a few weeks ago to offer his services to the War Office, has been appointed to the Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders.

Captain Alexander Frederick WATCHLIN, R.N.R., who resigned the charge of the U.S.S. Co.s tug Terawhiti last March to offer his services to the Imperial authorities, has been appointed as navigator to H.M.S. Jonquil (says the Auckland Star). Prior to this appointment Captain Watchlin was second in command of H.M. torpedo boat Thrasher. He also underwent a course of instruction in gunnery.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3213, 13 OCTOBER 1915
Dr William McKAY, of Greymouth, has just returned to England after spending four or five months as surgeon and superintendent of a British military hospital with the French army at Arc-en-Barrois, in the Argonne. The hospital was of 170 beds, and was attached to the Third Army. The staff was entirely British, but the hospital was under French military authority and inspection, and was a very efficient one. Amongst the British staff was the poet Masefield, Mr Phillimore (son of Mr Justice Phillimore), and at least a couple of well-known artists; while Lady Betty Koppel, a daughter of the Earl of Albemarle, is a probationer. As most of the French doctors are with the army, Dr McKay had an interesting experience of practice amongst the civil population. He returned to London because of the shortage of surgeons with the British forces but has now received advice which necessitates his early return to New Zealand. [SUN, VOLUME II, ISSUE 383, 3 MAY 1915 Dr William McKAY of Greymouth is at present in the north of France with the French Red Cross Medical Corps.]

Miss Emily Jane PETER (Christchurch), who went out to Serbia with Lady Paget's nursing mission last March, has now returned to London after many interesting experiences in that land. Miss Peter first of all settled in Uskubi, and worked in a surgical hospital there. All the patients had old wounds incurred in the fighting which took place before Christmas. In addition to the British, the Russians, French, and Americans also sent missions, which were badly wanted. Miss Peter further worked for a big hospital for Captain Bennett's unit for some time, and here she had the assistance of six Austrian orderlies, convalescent prisoners of war. Unfortunately, Miss Peter's health broke down, and she was forced to return to England. She travelled by way of Lemnos, Athens, and Malta. At the first place there was a huge fleet of warships, and at Malta she went ashore and looked up many New Zealanders in the hospital. She ascertained that the doctors had plenty of dressings, tobacco, and books, and the wards were clean and comfortable. Miss Peter is now quite well again, and is hopeful of going as a nurse to the Dardanelles. In the meantime she is working at Woolwich canteen, selling coffee to the arsenal workers.

Lieutenant Harry Foster HOLMDEN [Henry Foster HOLMDEN], R.A.M.C., who came Home a fortnight ago and received his commission in the R.A.M.C. at once, left on Sunday for the Dardanelles with a casualty clearing station.

Amongst the officers who have been awarded the Distinguished Service Order for acts of gallantry at the Dardanelles, is Captain Guy Westland GEDDES, of the 1st Battalion the Royal Munster Fusiliers. Captain Geddes is a New Zealander and served in the Boer war as a private in the Canterbury Company, of the 5th Regiment. He got his commission in the famous Irish regiment at the end of the war, and his promotion in 1910. The act for which he receives the D.S.O. is thus officially described: "On April 25, at Sedd-ul-Bahr, for gallantly leading his men into lighters and then swimming ashore under heavy fire. He continued doing duty until nightfall, although wounded early in the day."

Lieutenant William Oswald BERRYMAN, of the 1st Royal Dragoons, has come unscathed through a rather severe fortnight's fighting in Flanders, in the course of which his regiment lost seven officers (including the colonel) killed, and eight wounded, besides about 200 casualties in the ranks. Recently there was a great horse show at the front, the Indian Cavalry Corps showing many of their fine chargers. Lieutenant Berryman jumped one of his New Zealand chargers and made a very fair round, with the exception of the post and rails. More than one Olympia winner was on.

Captain John Henry Morris ARDEN, D.S.O., of the Worcester Regiment, has been wounded in Flanders. He is a well-known runholder at Cape Runaway.

Major Frank Berners KNYVETT, formerly of Auckland, has made a complete recovery from the wounds he received in German Southwest Africa, and after a month's training is taking up his commission as major in the Field Artillery. He will go to the front next week. Mrs Knyvett will remain in England until the end of the war.

Second Lieutenant Arthur Tahu Gravenor RHODES, of the Grenadier Guards (Special Reserve), who is acting on the staff of General Godley in the Dardanelles, has been promoted lieutenant.

Mr George Geoffrey SALE, son of Professor Sale, came home recently from South Africa, and has now received a commission in an infantry regiment.

Private R. S. WHITEMAN (Auckland) is with the 10th Royal Fusiliers on Salisbury Plain. He enlisted in Kitchener's army last August.

Sergeant Leopold Mielziner (Leo) MYERS (Auckland) has acted this week as recruiting sergeant in the Strand for his battalion, the 2nd Sportsman's, and has been in charge of the small office erected on a portion of the old Tivoli site. The battalion is to proceed to Mansfield shortly, and will be brigaded with the 1st Sportsmans. Mr Leo Myers joined the 2nd Battalion six months ago, and has won his promotion step by step in the noncommissioned ranks. He is now being given a first lieutenant's commission in the 18th Battalion, King's Royal Rifles which is being raised by Captain Sir Herbert Raphael, M.P. for South Derbyshire.

Mr Owen LECKY (Auckland) has a commission in the 3rd Battalion Highland Light Infantry.

Miss Dora Prendergast HARMAN (Christchurch) has gone to the Royal Herbert Military Hospital, Woolwich. She has signed on for a year, or for the duration of the war.

Acting Sub-lieutenant Oliver Jose Lewers SYMON is gazetted to torpedo boat 17. He was in the dominion with H.M.S. New Zealand as one of the midshipmen.

Sub-lieutenant Thomas James WOOD, R.N.R. (Christchurch), who has lately been granted a commission, has left for the north on submarine defence duties, with present headquarters at Inverness.

Mr J. N. NELSON (Owaka), lately returned to London from Brazil, where he has been engaged in mining, with the intention of trying to obtain a commission in the Engineers or in an infantry regiment. He is anxious to get to the front. [STAR, ISSUE 11700, 17 MAY 1916 - Lieutenant James NELSON 2-1 Home Counties R.E., belongs to Owaka, Otago. When war broke out he was a mining engineer in Brazil and came to England to join the forces.]

Miss Joan ALLAN (Poverty Bay) and Miss E. G. WILLIAMS are both doing military nursing in Gibraltar, where Miss HERDMAN is also similarly engaged. They went out in the same boat with the New Zealand nurses, there being also on board Dr Barnett (Dunedin), bound for Malta, and Dr Ackland (Christchurch), for Alexandria.

Private Cyril Bertram KENNY (Devonport, Auckland) is attached to C Company, 5th Battalion Canadian Contingent. He was in Flanders for three months in the ranks of the 1st Canadian Contingent, and got safely through the second battle of Ypres. On May 5 he received a shrapnel wound on the left arm at the Yser Canal, necessitating hospital treatment, first at Boulogne and then in England. He has since spent a pleasant furlough at Bristol, and is now quite fit again. Private Kenny has returned to the Canadian headquarters at Shorncliffe camp.

Lieutenant Patrick Kinloch CAMPBELL, 1st Battalion Black Watch, the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Patrick Campbell (Christchurch), left for the front again on July 6. This is his third period at the front, and in military circles this record is considered to be a great compliment. Lieutenant Campbell is in the pink of health now, and quite sound, and he expected to go immediately to the trenches with those left of his battalion; it was his lot to be in the trenches directly he returned to the front last time.

Miss Jessie FAULKNER (Christchurch), who has been appointed sister at a military hospital at Hampstead, now belongs to the Queen Alexandra Imperial Military Nursing Service Reserve. She hopes to be sent abroad later.

Able Seaman Sydney WILSON on board HMS Hercules, is a New Zealander.

Mr Henry Walker LANE (Christchurch), a member of the Inns of Court Training Corps, has been granted a commission in the Royal Engineers. [SUN, VOLUME V, ISSUE 1298, 11 APRIL 1918 Lieutenant H. W. Lane, Royal Engineers, son of Mr H. C. Lane, of Christchurch, has been elected a member of the Institute of Civil Engineers. Lieut. Lane was wounded while serving in Egypt, and upon recovery was sent to France, where he has been engaged in military engineering work for the last two years.]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3213, 13 OCTOBER 1915
Mr Arthur Wigley (Auckland) spent a few days last week with his mother, Mrs Wigley, Park Lane, before proceeding to Trentham, where he is joining a special tunnelling corps offered by the New Zealand Government to the Imperial Army.

WAIRARAPA DAILY TIMES, VOLUME LXIX, ISSUE 14409, 15 OCTOBER 1915
Mr Harry McCARDELL, for many years chief draughstman in the Land and Survey Department, Wellington, died after a short illness at Greytown, yesterday. Deceased was 57 years of age, and leaves a widow, four sons and one daughter. One of the sons, Mr J McCARDELL, is in the Imperial Army. [Joseph Walter Rohan McCARDELL 1NZEF 15/68].

OTAGO DAILY TIMES, ISSUE 16515, 15 OCTOBER 1915
... from Flanders comes the news of the death from wounds of Lieutenant Ian C. FINDLAY, the youngest son of three soldier sons of Sir John and Lady Findlay, for whom the deepest regret is expressed. Though the youngest of the three (Lieutenant Findlay) was the first to reach the front, and had been there with the York and Lancs, for two or three months.
Another New Zealander killed at the front in the East is Lieutenant H. E. VOYCE, of Christchurch, of the 4th Battalion Worcester Regiment. A son of Mr T. G. Voyce, of Christchurch, he went to Egypt with the New Zealanders, and there got his commission in the Imperial army. Attached to the 3rd battalion of the same regiment, in France, is another New Zealander (Lieutenant Richard Herbert MARRYATT, who got his commission at the beginning of the year. He is reported suffering from gas poisoning.
Mr John BARRIE-PANTON, an old Edinburgh boy, who was a corporal in the 2nd Battery, New Zealand Field Artillery, is gazetted a temporary second lieutenant in the Royal Field Artillery.
Promotions during the week include Second Lieutenant Grahame Forbes MICHIE, 8th Middlesex Regiment to be lieutenant; Lieutenant Gerald Deighton BAILEY, Leinster Regiment to be temporary captain; Lieutenant Matthew James MAKALUA 13th Battalion, Royal Sussex, to be temporary captain; Second Lieutenant Wyndham Waterhouse FITZHERBERT, 13th Royal Sussex, to be lieutenant.
Mr Ernest Richard LEARY, of the 3rd Auckland Regiment, and Mr Leonard Poulter LEARY, of the 5th Wellington Regiment, have both offered their services at the War Office, and have been placed on the Special Reserve; the former is attached to the 3rd York and Lancaster's, the latter to the 4a Reserve Brigade, R.F.A., Woolwich.
Mr Foster Brooke CROUCH, New Zealand Railway Department, who is in England on leave, has joined the Inns of Court Officers Training Corps.
Two New Zealand brothers on service in the navy are Messrs Henry Charles (Harry) SISLEY [1NZEF 23/1810 ] and Gordon Haselam SISLEY [1NZEF 4/634a], of Taranaki. The former is an engineer on the Swiftsure, the latter a telegraphist. Their sister (Miss Grace Fairhall SISLEY) is attached to the nursing staff at the New Zealand hospital at Walton.
New Zealanders will be interested to hear that Mr Lancelot B. TODD has been given a commission in infantry - the regiment is not yet specified. Until two years ago he played Rugby at Wigan. Immediately on the declaration of war he joined the New Zealanders who volunteered in this country, and was at Bulford. Very rapidly he was chosen sergeant-instructor, and went to Egypt with the British section.
Mr Clive W. CRACROFT-WILSON is gazetted second lieutenant in infantry.
Lieutenant Gerald Deighton BAILEY (son of Colonel C. S. Bailey, Timaru), Leinster Regiment (R. Canadians), has been promoted Captain as from the end of May. After his return from India upon the declaration of war, Captain Bailey was obliged to undergo an operation for appendicitis, and when convalescent he was sent to Cork, attached to the 3rd Battalion. He went to France early this year.
Second Lieutenant Grahame Forbes MICHIE (son of Mr A. M. Michie, late of Dunedin) has been promoted lieutenant. He obtained his commission in the 8th Royal Middlesex Regiment last February, shortly after his arrival from New Zealand.
Lieutenant Norman Reginald DAVENPORT, New Zealand Motor Service Corps, and Mr Frederick Charles Clement (Eric) CALDER, both of Auckland, arrived recently to offer their services here. They have both joined the Royal Naval Air Service, in which they have commissions as flight sub-lieutenants. They are being sent to Portsmouth for a course of training.
On account of ill-health, Lieutenant Eric Louis PHARAZYN, 3rd Norfolk Regiment, has been compelled to relinquish his commission.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3214, 20 OCTOBER 1915
Captain J. A. SLOANE, who arrived at Wellington from Sydney on the 11th inst. by the Moeraki, has had a remarkable experience during the present war, and has been recommended for the D.S.O. badge (says the New Zealand Times). Captain Sloane proceeded with the Manchester infantry in the first expeditionary force from England, and went to Flanders, where he spent 10 months. He was present at the taking of Termonde and Malines, the retreat from Mons, the battle of the Marne, the great fight for Hill 60, and was stricken by gas at Ypres, which so affected one of his lungs that he is now on six months leave of absence to recruit his health. Captain Sloane has been 13 years in the Imperial Army, and has the silver medal for the Indian frontier campaign, and the King and Queen's medal, with six bars, for the South African campaign. He won his commission at Ladysmith. Captain Sloane has already much improved through his trip abroad, and is looking forward to returning to the front on completion of his furlough.

Corporal Herbert William STEVENSON of the 20th Battalion, London Regiment, is a Musselburgh [Dunedin] boy, not yet 17 years of age, but nearly 6ft high, was so keen to fight for the Empire that he went up to Christchurch and enlisted. Failing to get through there, he went down to Lyttelton, and secured a situation as steward on the s.s. Mamari. He arrived in London on a Saturday, and enlisted in Kitchener's army on the Monday, his memory probably being rather defective when the question of age cropped up. He must have reached the trenches in France at the beginning of August. This must be about a record, as he left Wellington on June 10. He writes to his parents under date August 23 from the Convalescent Hospital at Epsom, saying that he had been three weeks in hospital, having been twice wounded by shrapnel, namely, on the fourth and fifth days in the trenches. He expected to get back to the base in France in three weeks from the time he wrote.

TARANAKI DAILY NEWS, 21 OCTOBER 1915
Lieutenant Harper Mervyn LEPPER, 4th Battalion, Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment), has been awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry on July 20th, 1915, at Hooge, when during a heavy bombardment, part of his trench was blown in and communication with the next battalion was lost. He extended his platoon through the ruins, and, although twice wounded, remained at his post, keeping up communications and sending in accurate information of the situation. Lieutenant Lepper, who is only 19 years of age, is a son of Mr. H. B. Lepper, of Lepperton, and was born and educated in Taranaki, being a prominent pupil of the New Plymouth High School. He was one of the several New Zealanders who qualified to be sent home for commissions in the Imperial Army, but owing to his age (17 years), he was turned down. His father, however, sent him to Sandhurst at the same time that the First Expeditionary Force left New Zealand. He was only three months at Home when he received his commission, and it was in his first engagement that he acted with such conspicuous bravery. In a letter to his parents, under date September 7th, from Woodland's Camp, Gillingham, he says: - "I had the surprise of my life this morning, when I read the paper and saw that I had won the Military Cross. I don't know whether to be glad or sorry, for I don't think that what I did merited the distinction. The Military Cross ribbon is blue in the centre, and white at each end. I don't know what the medal is like. The worst part of the whole show is to come. That will be when I have to go to Buckingham Palace to have it given to me by the King. As you will see, I am still with the battalion. Today, I was to go to Fort Borstal for a machine-gun course, but I am not going now. I did not want to go, as you have to be there a month, and that would prevent my going out to the front for some time. I told the commanding officer that I did not want to go, but he said I had to. To-day, when he heard that I had won the M.C., he told me that I need not go, so I am staying on here. Goodness only knows when orders for the front will come, and I am rather anxious to know which battalion I shall go to."

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3218, 17 NOVEMBER 1915
... from Flanders comes the news of the death from wounds of Lieutenant Ian Calcutt FINDLAY, the youngest son of three soldier sons of Sir John and Lady Findlay, for whom the deepest regret is expressed. Though the youngest of the three (Lieutenant Findlay) was the first to reach the front, and had been there with the York and Lancs, for two or three months.

Another New Zealander killed at the front in the East is Lieutenant Henry Eugene (Harry) VOYCE of Christchurch, of the 4th Battalion Worcester Regiment. A son of Mr T. G. Voyce, of Christchurch, he went to Egypt with the New Zealanders, and there got his commission in the Imperial army. Attached to the 3rd battalion of the same regiment, in France, is another New Zealander (Lieutenant Richard Herbert MARRYATT), who got his commission at the beginning of the year. He is reported suffering from gas poisoning.

Mr John BARRIE-PANTON, an old Edinburgh boy, who was a corporal in the 2nd Battery, New Zealand Field Artillery, is gazetted a temporary second lieutenant in the Royal Field Artillery. Promotions during the week include Second Lieutenant Grahame Forbes MICHIE, 8th Middlesex Regiment, to be lieutenant; Lieutenant Gerald Deighton BAILEY, Leinster Regiment, to be temporary captain; Lieutenant Matthew James Manuia MAKALUA, 13th Battalion, Royal Sussex, to be temporary captain; Second Lieutenant Wyndham Waterhouse FITZHERBERT, 13th Royal Sussex, to be lieutenant. Captain Wilmot Clifton QUINNELL (Wellington), who was appointed to this rank in Australia on being requisitioned as veterinary officer, is in London at present, and he has been informed that he is to retain the rank of captain. Instructions have reached him to proceed to Aldershot headquarters for duty. He was in Egypt until the middle of July, when orders were issued for him to come to England. Captain Quinnell has recently heard from his son at the Dardanelles, Corporal Alfred QUINNELL, announcing that he has been transferred from the Wellington Regiment to the Auckland machine gun section.

Mr Ernest Richard LEARY of the 3rd Auckland Regiment, and Mr Leonard Poulter LEARY of the 5th Wellington Regiment, have both offered their services at the War Office, and have been placed on the Special Reserve; the former is attached to the 3rd York and Lancasters, the latter to the 4th Reserve Brigade, R.F.A., Woolwich.

Mr Foster Brooke CROUCH, New Zealand Railway Department, who is in England on leave, has joined the Inns of Court Officers Training Corps.

New Zealanders will be interested to hear that Mr Lancelot Beaumont TODD has been given a commission in infantry, the regiment is not yet specified. Until two years ago he played Rugby at Wigan. Immediately on the declaration of war he joined the New Zealanders who volunteered in this country, and was at Bulford. Very rapidly he was chosen sergeant-instructor, and went to Egypt with the British section.

Mr Clive Winthorpe CRACROFT-WILSON is gazetted second lieutenant in the infantry. Lieutenant Gerald Deighton BAILEY (son of Colonel C. S. Bailey, Timaru), Leinster Regiment (R. Canadians), has been promoted Captain as from the end of May. After his return from India upon the declaration of war, Captain Bailey was obliged to undergo an operation for appendicitis, and when convalescent he was sent to Cork, attached to the 3rd Battalion. He went to France early this year.

Second Lieutenant Grahame Forbes MICHIE (son of Mr A. M. Michie, late of Dunedin) has been promoted lieutenant. He obtained his commission in the 8th Royal Middlesex Regiment last February, shortly after his arrival from New Zealand.

Lieutenant Norman Reginald DAVENPORT, New Zealand Motor Service Corps, and Mr Frederick Charles Clement (Eric) CALDER, both of Auckland, arrived recently to offer their services here. They have both joined the Royal Naval Air Service, in which they have commissions as flight sub-lieutenants. They are being sent to Portsmouth for a course of training.

On account of ill-health, Lieutenant Eric Louise PHARAZYN, 3rd Norfolk Regiment, has been compelled to relinquish his commission.

Captain Guy FETHERSTON, R.F.A. (Auckland), is at present in London for a few days prior to taking up a new post in command of a battery. Captain Fetherston, who served with one of our contingents in the South African war, and commenced this war in the 2nd King Edward's Horse, was slightly wounded after Neuve Chapelle, but remained on duty. He has been at the front for almost six months, and has well earned his promotion. He will go to the Divisional Artillery of the 33rd Division, which means being in England probably for some time.

Mr George Lublin TACON (Christchurch), who has been training with the Inns of Court Training Corps for some months, has been appointed to a second lieutenancy in the 11th Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment.

Another Canterbury boy training in the Inns of Court O.T.C. is Mr Selwyn Peter HOPE of Timaru, who was formerly a student at Clare College, Cambridge. Mr Hope expects his commission in the course of a few days.

Another Timaru boy, Mr Jack [Jacke Heaton?] RHODES, has recently graduated through the Inns of Court and got his commission.

Mr Duncan Forrest BAUCHOP (Christchurch), a brother of the late Colonel Bauchop, is in London, and is hoping to get a commission in the navy for the war.

Mrs Harriet SIMEON, wife of Captain Simeon, who accompanied the New Zealand Expedition to Samoa, is in London with the intention of doing some military nursing.

Mr Claude Alan JORDAN, son of Mr C. G. Jordan, Under-secretary for Justice, came to England with the intention of enlisting in a British line regiment and getting to the front as quickly as possible. He has spent some weeks visiting friends in the Old Country and has now gone to the depot of the King's Royal Rifles, the old 60th Regiment, in which his grandfather held a commission.

Sub-lieutenant Asshelton James (Ashton) LEVER-NAYLOR, R.N.R., formerly of the Union Steam Company has been promoted acting-lieutenant. He has had three months service in the Royal Navy.

Mr Robert William HANNAH and Mr Oscar Eugene GALLIE, both of Wellington, have been posted as second lieutenants to the Royal Field Artillery.

Dr Andrew Bonar LINDSAY, who has done a year's service in the R.A.M.C., and was mentioned in despatches a few months ago, has relinquished his commission. Temporary lieutenants in the medical service generally sign on from year to year.

A young Otago boy, Mr Albert HOLDEN, of Clyde, who was in the Philippines when war broke out (engaged in dredging) made his way to England by China, Japan, Siam, and India, and has now offered his services. On presenting himself at the War Office he was advised to offer himself for a commission, and did some time in the Inns of Court O.T.C. He has now obtained his transfer to the Artists Rifles, the battalion of the County of London Regiment, which has the proud distinction of maintaining an officers training corps in the field.

Mr Anthony William Fabio CACCIA-BIRCH, the eldest son of Mr W. Caccia-Birch, of Rangitikei, has been successful in the examination for admission to the Royal Military College at Sandhurst, and went in to term to study for infantry or army service corps. He was at Huntley School at Marton, and for the last few years at Marlborough College, in England.

Mr Leopold Mielziner (Leo) MYERS, of Auckland, has been posted as temporary lieutenant to the 18th Battalion the King's Royal Rifles, one of the new formations under the last call for 300,000 men. It is colloquially known as the Arts and Crafts Battalion.

Mr Thomas Poole JAMES (Feilding) has joined the Army Service Corps (Mechanical Branch) as motor ambulance driver, and has been sent to the Grove Park Depot. Mr James, who came to England to offer his services, has recently been visiting his brother at Newcastle, and relatives at Weymouth.

Mr D. MILNE (Waipukurau) arrived by the Remuera: he has come to offer his services to the War Office.

Lieutenant Peter John EWING, R.N.R. (Island Bay, Wellington), is in charge of the naval station at Olna Firth, Shetland Islands. From the North Sea Fleet he was transferred to the Humber for "Boom Defence," and later appointed to his present post.

Mr John Anthony CARR, Auckland Expeditionary Force, who went to Samoa, and then came to England to offer his services here, is now a Flight Sub-lieutenant in the Royal Naval Air Service, and is stationed near Chingford. His mother has taken a house in Epping Forest, to be near her son.

Another New Zealander who obtained his discharge in New Zealand after doing seven months garrison duty in Samoa, and who has come to England, is Mr William Baldwin BUSBY (of the firm of Clare and Busby, Wellington). He has obtained a commission in the 12th Worcestershire Regiment, and is now at Fort Purbrook near Portsmouth.

Lieutenant Hugh Montagu BUTTERWORTH (Christchurch), 9th Rifle Brigade, is at Ypres. Misses Margaret and May Butterworth, who have a boarding school at New Milton, Hants, are spending their vacation with associations engaged on war work, the former with the National Food Reform Association, which is doing good work in preaching practical economy, and the latter with the National Political League, which is engaged in supplying women and training them to take the places of men. The Misses Irene and Molly Butterworth are also working with the same bodies.

Captain and Adjutant Richard Guy Torrington MOODY-WARD, 2nd Royal Berkshire Regiment, who was gazetted missing and wounded early in May, is now reported to have been killed. His mother, who lives at Caversham, Oxfordshire, was formerly Mrs CHETHAM-STRODE, of Dunedin.

Lieutenant Andrew Morton YOUNG, R.A.M.C. (Auckland), attached to the Lowland Mounted Brigade Field Ambulance, has been promoted captain.

Dr Arthur Grueby CLARK is gazetted to a commission as lieutenant in the R.A.M.C.

A young New Zealander who joined the Army Service Corps here in the early days of the war, and who, at the time, was only 17 years of age, was Mr Daniel THORNTON, grandson of the late Captain WORSP, of Auckland. He belongs to the Munition Column, went early to France, and was in the retreat from Mons. During the second battle of Ypres his section received praise for the manner in which the ammunition was brought to the division which this column was serving. Previous to training, young Thornton was at Aldershot for two months, learning to become a despatch rider, attached to the Royal Engineers. His mother, Mrs Thornton, lives at Monks Risboro, Bucks.

Mr Edward Joseph PRESNALL (Richmond, Christchurch) has gone to Ireland, having joined King Edward's Horse, which is at the Curragh.

Second-lieutenant Roy James FITZGERALD (Wellington) belongs to the 12th (Service) Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, now in camp at Codford St. Mary.

Dr Leslie Norman REECE (Christchurch), who took his medical course at St.Thomas Hospital, has obtained a commission as lieutenant in the R.A.M.C., but he has been advised to work in this country during the coming winter, and to go abroad later if required. Last September Dr Reece went to Belgium as surgeon of the Belgian Field Hospital, a British voluntary undertaking, which was able to render much assistance to the Belgians at a time when they were practically destitute of hospitals near the firing line. Unluckily, four months ago Dr Reece was invalided home, and had to undergo an operation at St Thomas's Hospital. From this he has quite recovered.

Mr Joseph Stafford (Joe) GLOVER (Wellington), who was in England studying dentistry when war broke out, enlisted at once in the Royal Engineers (signal service) and is now stationed at Warren Heath camp, near Ipswich.

Lieutenant Hamiton Claude Carelton HERAPATH (Auckland) has been promoted to full rank in his regiment, the 8th East Kent.

Mr Gilbert Hutton GRIGG and Mr John Hutton GRIGG, sons of Mr J. C. N. Grigg (Longbeach, Canterbury), who have been training in the Inns of Court O.T.C., have both been posted as second-lieutenants to the North Irish Horse.

Mr Neill Aylmer RATTRAY (Dunedin) has received his first commission in the 4th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers.

Privates Benjamin GOOD (Mount Eden, Auckland) and Cecil Stuart KENNEDY (Porirua), two reservists who were recalled to the colours, are among the list of prisoners in Germany. Both belong to the Scots Guards. [EVENING STAR, ISSUE 17619, 26 MARCH 1921. DEATHS. KENNEDY On 10th January, at London, Private Cecil Stuart Kennedy, 2nd Battalion Scots Guards, beloved husband of Maidie Kennedy, and youngest son of W. D. M. Kennedy, late of Tyne street, Roslyn, and brother of W. and M. Kennedy, School street, Roslyn, from after effects of imprisonment in Germany; aged 29 years. He did his duty.]

Gunner J. W. MORTON (Rangiora), 91st Heavy Battery [Royal Garrison Artillery], is out at the Dardanelles.[Is this Walter Morton - Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery, No.13490 on Archway.]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3219, 24 NOVEMBER 1915
Mr Gordon Thompson PETTIGREW, formerly associated with the Dannevirke branch of the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile, will leave shortly for England, having been accepted for service with the Royal Army Flying Corps (says the correspondent of the Hawkes Bay Herald.) He is the eighth man from the firms branch there to volunteer for service.

Private Colin Albert FAIRBAIRN, who has been killed in action, was a son of Mr James Fairbairn, of Highcliff. He joined the Canadian Reinforcements, being attached to the machine gun section. Just prior to leaving England he wrote stating that his brigade was embarking next day, presumably for France. Private Fairbairn was the second son of Mr Fairbairn who had died in his country's service, a younger brother, Hunter Fairbairn, being killed a few days after the landing at the Dardanelles. [Served as Colin McDONALD Service Number 75370 29th Bn Canadian Infantry Died 26 September 1915.][OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3219, 24 NOVEMBER 1915. FOR THE EMPIRE'S CAUSE. FAIRBAIRN - On September 26, killed whilst on active service in France, Colin Albert, third son of James Fairbairn, of Highcliff; aged 23 years.]

Advice has been received (says the Poverty Bay Herald) that Miss Mabel Gertrude HYDE, of Gisborne, who has been visiting England and helping at a munition factory, has gone to Malta as a nurse.

Major Bernard Cecil FREYBERG, of Wellington, is now a commander in the Royal Naval Brigade. This unit has had some startling experiences recently, for in Hood's No. 1 Brigade on September 21 there remained but five officers out of an original 120. In his battalion Commander Freyberg is the only officer who went through the Antwerp expedition, only 30 men remaining with him.

Mr Robert Macfarlane MURIE, who was last heard of en route to England from British East Africa to join the Royal Flying Corps, writes to a Southland friend (says the Times) that he joined the corps, and got his stripes as sergeant-pilot. Later, however, another opening presented itself, and last month Mr Murie wrote from London that he was leaving for Southampton next day as lieutenant in the 10th Labour Battalion of the Royal Engineers. What lay ahead of him after reaching Southampton he did not know. [Regiment or Corps: East African Mounted Rifles, Royal Engineers Regimental Number: 234, 234]

An Aucklander has received from Private Ben GOOD, an Auckland man who enlisted in the Scots Guards in England at the beginning of the war, a letter written from a German prison camp, showing that the British prisoners chief trouble is serious lack of good food. The writer was taken prisoner during the Neuve Chapelle action. He states: "Twice a month I am allowed to write a letter. No doubt you have often wondered why I have not written before, but I did not think the war would last so long, and I have been in communication with all the people I know in England to send me out a parcel of eatables, etc. I am now of a different opinion as regards the war, and as all war news is strictly forbidden in all letters, let that suffice, and when writing don't say anything about the war, as all letters are censored. In regard to myself, I am well, and this place, Merseberg, in Saxony, is where I am imprisoned. We are working out in the open, and it gives you a terrible appetite. Can you and Dad with any other help you can get, send me a parcel or a box of tinned eatables every now and again? Anything you can eat, that is, in tins, will be acceptable and being in tins will stand the long voyage. Anything like the following will do: Tea, coffee, cocoa, milk, sugar, jam, dripping, tinned bread, biscuits, fish, corned beef, or any other tinned meat, sweets, sardines, in fact, anything in tins. Send as often as you can, and if any of your chums will help you, I will be very much obliged. All my pals in the regiment are gone - killed, I mean, with one exception, Kennedy, who is with me here, there being only 39 left out of my battalion. Yours ever, Pte Ben Good, No. 7 Co., Kriegs, gefangenlager. Merseberg, Germany, care G.P.O., Mount Pleasant, London. England. P.S. Don't waste any time, as it takes an awful long time to come all this way.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3223, 22 DECEMBER 1915
The grounds upon which his Majesty the King has conferred a Military Cross upon Temporary Second Lieutenant Watson Douglas SHENNAN, R.E., attd. 47 (London) Division Signalling Company (Territorial Force), son of Mr Watson Shennan, of Dunedin, are thus described in the official notification - For conspicuous gallantry and resource on September 26, 1915, when he led a party to lay a cable line between Maroc and Loos under very heavy shell and machine gun fire.

Challen Hasler Lufkin SKEET, second lieutenant in the 12th Royal Fusiliers, was in the big engagement at Loos, France, from September 25 to 27 and was unfortunately taken prisoner. He is reported to have acted with great gallantry, and to have upheld the reputation of his native land, New Zealand. Mr Skeet is the only son of Mr and Mrs Challen Skeet, for many years resident in Oamaru and Dunedin.

OAMARU MAIL, VOLUME XL, ISSUE 12731, 28 DECEMBER 1915
Lieutenant Leonard William TOSSWILL, of the 9th Battalion Warwickshire Regiment, has arrived in England to recover from a slight bomb wound in the thigh (says a London correspondent). He is already able to move about freely, and will probably rejoin his depot in about a month. Lieutenant Tosswill, who belongs to Christchurch, and is an old boy of Waitaki High School, went to Egypt as a sergeant in the Fourth Reinforcements. On joining the main body all the non-commissioned officers became once more full privates, and Mr Tosswill was a corporal until the big advance early in August. As the result of what happened then, he and an Auckland boy were selected for commissions in the Imperial Army, and he was posted to his present battalion, which is now in the Mediterranean.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3225, 5 JANUARY 1916
Mr Charles Geoffrey HARRISON, of North Canterbury, who came to England three months ago, has been appointed second lieutenant in the York and Lancashire Regiment. His brother, Mr John Roscoe HARRISON, is in the Honourable Artillery Company at the front, and is one of the bomb throwers of his company.

Captain Edward Ffrancis Ward LASCELLES, of the 3rd Dragoon Guards, is promoted major. Captain Lascelles has for the last year or two been a brigade major in the south-western command.

Sergeant Arthur Christian Cottenham KINGSFORD, of the 2nd King Edward's Horse, is now a second lieutenant in the Royal Engineers.

Mr J. G. [John Endall?] WANKLYN (Christchurch) has entered for a term at Oxford, and hopes to get a commission through the O.T.C. there.

Mr Alexander McNeil (Alec) PROCTOR (Wellington) hopes to join the Royal Flying School at Farnborough. Mr Proctor was for some time honorary pastor of the Takapuna Baptist Church.

Lieutenant Leonard William TOSSWILL of the 9th Battalion Warwickshire Regiment, has arrived in England to recover from a slight bomb wound in the thigh. He is already able to move about freely, and will probably rejoin his depot in about a month. Lieut. Tosswill, who belongs to Christchurch, and is an old boy of Waitaki High School, went to Egypt as a sergeant in the Fourth Reinforcements. On joining the main body all the non-commissioned officers became once more full privates, and Mr Tosswill was a corporal until the big advance early in August. As the result of what happened then, he and an Auckland boy were for commissions in the Imperial Army, and he was posted to his present battalion, which is now in the Mediterranean.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3225, 5 JANUARY 1916
An instance of rapid promotion of a New Zealander is mentioned in a letter we have received from a correspondent in England. The New Zealand is Major Francis Richard McMAHON, R.E, who hails from Wellington but is well known in Cromwell and was a student in the Otago School of Mines some years ago. He enlisted as a trooper in King Edward's Horse, but in January last, before that regiment went to the front, he obtained a commission in an infantry regiment. This was followed in May last by a transfer, with a captaincy to the Royal Engineers, in which corps he secured his majority in October. It is claimed that this represents the most rapid promotion that has been gained by a New Zealander in the army.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3226, 12 JANUARY 1916
The papers on Saturday morning will publish a gazette of 77 pages of names of officers and men recommended for gallantry and distinguished service in the field by Field-marshal French. The list includes ... the following New Zealanders: Major-general Richard Hutton DAVIES, Lieutenant-colonel William James Theodore GLASGOW (West Surrey Regiment), Lieutenant-colonel Alfred Edgar GLASGOW (Sussex Regiment), Lieutenant William Oswald BERRYMAN (1st Royal Dragoons), Lieutenant Frederick Allan HELLABY (attached to the Devonshire Regiment). Lieutenant-colonels A. E. and W. J. Glasgow, mentioned in the cables, are old Nelson Collegians. The latter proceeded straight from the Nelson College Cadets to the Imperial army. Quite a number of Nelson Collegians have done the same.

Advice has been received by Mr G. W. Geddes, Maitland street, Dunedin, that his son, Private Percy Mannering GEDDES, of the Third Battalion, Canadians, has been missing since the sinking of the Anglia last November, and that it is feared that he has been drowned. Private Geddes, who was 32 years of ago, went to Canada eight years ago, and on the outbreak of war he joined the forces there. He spent about 12 months in the trenches, and took part in the big battle at Ypres.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3227, 19 JANUARY 1916
Mr Thomas Mitchell Aubrey HASLETT, M.A., Otago University, who was secretary for the Australasian Students' Christian Movement until 1914, and then went to America to study at the Oberlin College, Ohio, has gone to England to offer his services.

Mr Wylie (inspector of schools under the Southland Board) hos received a further cablegram from England advising him that his son Captain Thomas Henry WYLIE, R.A.M.C. has lost his right eye and has shell wounds in his arm and legs. He is still in France and improving rapidly, and will be shortly removed to England.

Messrs Wilfred FOWLER and S. BURRELL, two Feilding residents, left by the Remuera on Friday (says the Wellington Post) to join the Flying Corps.

"Somewhere in France," an old Petone boy, Mr Arthur Edward KELLY, son of Mr W. H. Kelly, of Patrick street, Petone, is serving as a sergeant in the 3rd King Edward's Horse, a cavalry regiment. "Our regiment," he writes to his parents, "has done splendid work out here, but it has cost us dearly, and up to date 200 of our boys have been put out of action. For nearly eight mouths we have been in the trenches. I cannot tell you anything concerning military matters, but I may say that we have got all that is required to win - men, money, munitions, and guns. It will take a little time, we all know, but we shall win; there is nothing surer." Sergeant Kelly enlisted in London four days after war broke out. He states that his training in the Petone Navals stood him in good stead, and it was not long before he became a sergeant. "We are excellently fed," he continues his letter, "and also well clothed and supplied with smokes."

An "Old Boy" of the Otago Boys' High School was in London last weekend on special leave from the French military authorities (writes our London correspondent on December 3). He was Mr James WADDELL, of Cromwell, who was at the Otago High School in the late 'eighties. He is commander of a battalion in the French army, with a rank corresponding with lieutenant colonel in the British Army. He left New Zealand many years ago, became a naturalised Frenchman, and joined the French army. He has seen considerable fighting, and previous to the present war had medals for the Sahara, Morocco, and Indo-China campaigns. Now he has two new decorations- -the Legion of Honour and the medal for being mentioned in despatches. He was twice mentioned by the French Commander for bravery at the Dardanelles, where he was wounded during the summer, and returned to France. Having recovered he took part in the recent fighting in Champagne. Mr Waddell is now looking fit and well. He still takes keen interest in New Zealand, and hopes to pay a visit to the dominion after the war.

Writing to his partner (Mr Harry Turner, of Masterton), Mr L. PITCHER, who is now in the Aviation Flying Corps camp at Basra, Mesopotamia, says that he is 'sick' of Mesopotamia, and would be glad if he could get to France or any European country. He hoped, however, that they would soon be moving up to higher country, which would be more congenial. Mr Pitcher was air mechanic for Mr Scotland, the aviator who visited New Zealand some time ago. Mr Scotland has been sent back to India, suffering with a bad throat. The trouble is an old one, and Mr Pitcher says he will not be surprised if Mr Scotland returns to New Zealand. The climate of Mesopotamia did not agree with him at all. Mr Pitcher says that Mr Robert Stanley (Stan) BREWSTER, of Wellington, who is in the same aviation camp, is in good health.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3228, 26 JANUARY 1916
A private cable message received in Wellington states (says the Dominion) that Lieutenant Francis Featherstone (Frank) NEWMAN, Royal Horse Artillery has gone to Flanders. Lieutenant Newman is a member of the firm of Moorhouse, Hadfield and Newman, solicitors, Wellington, and only son of Dr Newman, M.P.

A few lines, received at Kaitangata last week, from Dr John Bruce BAIRD, who has been decorated with the Military Cross, from 'somewhere in France' conveys the news that he is medical officer to the famous 1st Black Watch Regiment, First Division (says the correspondent of the Free Press). He says he is very proud to be connected with what is, no doubt,'the finest regiment of the whole army in France'. He expected to be transfered to a brigade of artillery about the New Year, and as he expressed it, 'he would then have sampled the lot, except medical officer to trains and ammunition columns, which are tame jobs.'

Among the killed at Suvla Bay was Lieutenant James Hugh HENDERSON, of the Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment. Lieutenant Henderson was killed action on November 7. He was an Otago Boy, his parents being Mr and Mrs John Henderson, of Ashburton, late of Wylie's Crossing, Taieri. He learned the engineering trade in Dunedin, and afterwards went to British Guiana, which place he left to join the ranks of the British army after the outbreak of war.

Private Thomas Archdell BYRN, of Masterton, has joined the aircraft section of the British forces, and is now in France.

Dr James Christopher WADMORE (Bay of Plenty) has obtained a commission as temporary lieutenant in the R.A.M.C. and expects to join a hospital ship. His brother, Mr Alfred Mervyn WADMORE, who arrived in England in July, has joined the Officers Training Corps.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3229, 2 FEBRUARY 1916
The warehouse and factory employees of Messrs Hallenstein Bros (Ltd.) gathered last evening for the purpose of bidding farewell and God-speed to Mr Bendix Hallenstein DE BEER, a son of one of the directors of the company, who is leaving for England to join the Imperial Artillery. In wishing Mr de Beer a successful military carer and a safe return to New Zealand, the employees broke away from the usual custom of giving a presentation by handing Mr de Beer a sum of money, with a request that in any spare time during his course of training in England, and he so desired, he might spend the money in the purchase of luxuries for the benefit of any of the 40 odd employees of the company who have enlisted or on any other needy New Zealanders invalided to the Old Country. Mr E. E. Nicolson secretary of the company, in addressing Mr de Beer, stated that the directors were so pleased with the idea that they had increased the employees fund by a substantial cheque.

Sir Robert James Milo WALKER, who holds a captain's commission in the Coldstream Guards, is at present on a visit to Auckland. He has come to New Zealand at the invitation of the New Zealand Defence authorities, and he will probably take up an appointment on the Defence Staff. He has been fighting in the present war, and he was in France with his regiment in March last, but was invalided home. He is now recuperating.

Mr Leslie Maynard BRAIN, of the Christchurch branch of the Union Bank of Australia, and Mr Herbert George KEMP, of the Public Works Department, Christchurch, left Wellington by the Corinthic on January 24 for London, where they will report to the High Commissioner (says the Press). They intend to offer their services to the Imperial authorities.

NEW ZEALAND HERALD, VOLUME LIII, ISSUE 16144, 4 FEBRUARY 1916 Two officers of the Imperial Army arrived by the steamer Rotorua for the purpose of joining the Defence Force Staff of the Dominion. One was Captain Henry Alexander Cooper, of the 5th Royal Irish Lancers, and the other Captain Richard NEAVE, of the Essex Regiment. Each officer is accompanied by his wife. They will proceed to Wellington by the Rotorua.
Captain Cooper, as the result of his efforts during the first six months of the war in Flanders, gained the Russian War Cross. His health became impaired to such an extent as to make him unfit for further active service, but he has recovered sufficiently to be able to take up instructional work. Captain Neave was gazetted as a captain in the Essex Regiment in November, 1911, and is coming to New Zealand for the purpose of taking up a position as assistant-instructor in musketry and machine gun work. He saw active service in Gallipoli with the 29th Division, and was machine gun officer of the 88th Brigade. He was invalided to England, and subsequently received his present appointment. Captain Neave is the fourth Imperial officer who has come from England to take up an appointment on the staff of the Defence Force in the Dominion. The first was Major James Lewis SLEEMAN, of the Royal Sussex Regiment, who arrived on the Ruahine on Januarv 5. Sir Robert James Milo WALKER, who holds a captain's commission in the Coldstream Guards, as already announced, is also taking up an appointment in New Zealand. On account of the departure to the front of a number of officers connected with the training of the forces in the Dominion, the Government some time ago applied to the Imperial authorities for the appointment of seven or eight officers who had seen service in the firing line, and, though invalided, would still be available for instructional work. The appointments referred to are the outcome of this request.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3230, 9 FEBRUARY 1916
Mr F. W. Petre received news by last week's mail that his son, Lieutenant Edward Henry PETRE has once more been promoted, and is now a captain in the 2nd Suffolk Regiment. Captain Petre joined the Suffolks eight months ago, and this is his third promotion.

Amongst the Gisborne boys who have been serving with the British Forces in France is George REDPATH, son of Mrs Redpath, of Rakauroa (says the Gisborne Times). This young man proved a brilliant pupil at the Gisborne School, and subsequently at the Gisborne High School. He chose for himself a medical career, and after obtaining the highest honours at Gisborne, entered the Otago University, where he had a successful course, eventually passing his final examination as a doctor. In March he went to England to join the Royal Army Medical Corps, and subsequently proceeded to France on active service. Since being at the front he has had numerous narrow escapes, both from snipers and poisonous gas. On one occasion he was slightly affected by gas, but quickly recovered; but in the battle of Loos, in September, he received a dose of the poisonous vapour, as the result of which he was invalided back to England. Fortunately, ho has made a good recovery, and is now convalescent at Falmouth, doing light duties.

Private George Dickinson HARLE, formerly employed in the railway service at Dunedin, Seacliffe, Hyde, and Clinton, and who resigned his position to proceed to Great Britain to answer the Empire's call, writes to his parents (Mr and Mrs G. Harle, Milburn) regarding his experiences in the fighting line on the western frontier. Writing from "Somewhere in Belgium" (presumably Ypres, from post-card views received), under date of December 14, Private Harle (who joined Buller's Own Rifle Brigade) stated that his company was enjoying a few days rest in camp after strenuous fighting. During their period in the trenches and whilst in reserve the experiences had been thrilling, and there had been many hair-breadth escapes from the enemy's bursting explosive shells, although he had been fortunate enough to escape injury, many of his companions had been injured or killed outright. "Mud baths" from the bursting shells and "whizz bangs" (small shells for destroying trench parapets) were frequent, but the discomforts of trench life were cheerfully borne, although in portions they had to sit out in pouring rain owing to the fact that the dug-out had fallen in or been destroyed by the enemy's shells.

NEW ZEALAND HERALD, VOLUME LIII, ISSUE 16149, 10 FEBRUARY 1916
News was received in Christchurch today of the death, in action in Flanders, Sergeant-Major Henry Gerald WESTON, well known throughout New Zealand as a member of the Defence staff. Sergeant-Major Weston made many attempts to get to the front, but his services being very valuable to the authorities for training purposes, they were reluctant to let him go. Finally, he managed to get away, and arrived in England in August, and immediately joined the Royal West Kent Regiment. A very large share of adventure was the lot of Sergeant-Major Weston. The son of the Rev. F. C. Weston, of West Horsley, Surrey, and at one time chaplain to the Derajat Brigade, Sergeant-Major Weston some years ago enlisted in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. With his regiment he took part in the occupation of Crete in 1896. The two next years saw him participating in the Soudan war with the Tenth Soudanese Regiment, being present at the battles of Atbara and Omdurman. Sergeant-Major Weston went to Crete on the outbreak there, then 1899 saw him in China. In 1900 the Boxer outbreak occurred, and Sergeant-Major Weston was engaged in the operations which resulted in the taking of the Kowloon hinterlands. In 1905 he was in India. He left the Imperial Army in 1907, and went to West Africa. Afterwards he was fighting with the United States Army in the Philippines. He joined the New Zealand staff in January, 1913.

MANAWATU STANDARD, VOLUME XLI, ISSUE 10292, 12 FEBRUARY 1916
Mr Walter Edwin MOULDEY, recently of Christchurch, has been gazetted second lieutenant in the Lancashire Fusiliers. Mr Mouldey went to England some time ago, with the object of joining the Imperial army.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3231, 16 FEBRUARY 1916
Mr Thomas Grey CULLING, only son of Mr and Mrs T S Culling of Remuera and formerly of Dunedin, has been promoted to the rank of sub-lieutenant in the Royal Navy Flying Corps. He is now stationed at Portsmouth.

Mr Wilfred Wyan FISHER, son of Mr T R Fisher, St Clair, who left Canada as transport sergeant with the 48th Canadian Highlanders, in the early stages of the war, and subsequently passed his examination for a commission, has been appointed first lieutenant in his regiment, which is located on the western front in France.

William BROAD, rejected by the New Zealand recruiting authorities as too short, stowed himself away on a English-bound ship, working his passage after being discovered on the sixth day. He ended a journey of 10,000 miles at Leicester, his old home, where (says the London Observer), to his delight, they accepted him as a 'bantam.'

STAR, ISSUE 11627, 19 FEBRUARY 1916
The Gisborne Times states that the local council's beach caretaker, Mr Thomas HANLON, although sixty-three years of age, has been sent for by the War Office, and he proceeds shortly to London to take up a position on the Recruiting Staff for the English Expeditionary Forces. Mr Hanlon spent 27 years in the Imperial Army, and took his discharge at Calcutta with the rank of Sergeant-Instructor. Referring to his age, he said that age did not count now - it was a man's service papers that were responsible for an appointment, for a position could be found for every competent Imperial man. The War Office has sent Mr Hanlon £1OO to pay the passage money of himself and his wife Home. He was attached to the 55th (Cumberland) Regiment and went to India in 1875, and was through several frontier engagements and the Afghan War. He also took part in the Delhi Durbar in 1876 at the proclamation of Queen Victoria, and later participated in several small punitive expeditions against rebellious tribes. During his service sometimes the Imperial troops were on marches lasting three and four months. Most of his time was in the Punjab, round Benares, at Lucknow, finishing up at Calcutta, where he took his discharge and returned to London. Hoping to make a fortune, he came to New Zealand about seven years ago. But the trouble is, said Mr Hanlon, that I brought more gold with me than I am taking away.

AUCKLAND STAR, VOLUME XLVII, ISSUE 45, 22 FEBRUARY 1916
Private information received here, writes our Waihi correspondent, records the death of Captain Moray, a well known Waihi resident, who joined one of the early reinforcements for the front. Captain Moray was killed in action at Loos. He was an Imperial Army officer, and served through the Boer war, holding a commission in a Scottish regiment. He was a most popular officer. It is understood that he leaves a widow and two children, who reside in this Dominion. The soldier referred to by our representative at Waihi is, it may almost certainly be assumed, Major Arthur William Donald MORAY, who was attached to the 6th (Hauraki) Regiment. He was promoted to the rank of major in the Territorials early in 1914. In addition to his extensive experience in the Boer war (1899-1902), for which he held the Queen's medal with five clasps and the King's medal with two clasps, he held medals for operations on the Indian frontier in 1892 and in the Matabele rising, 1896-7. He went Home to offer his services to the Imperial authorities. [However he appears to have served with the Australian Imperial Force as Captain Arthur William Donald STUART-MORAY and died in 1948 in Wellington, NZ.]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3233, 1 MARCH 1916
Lieutenant Robert Gardiner SELLAR [SELLARS], R.F.A., is reported severely wounded in France. Lieutenant Sellars is the son of the late Mr Sellars, of Oamaru, who had a watchmaker's business in Itchen street, and is a nephew of Mr George Gardiner (says the Mail). He is an old Waitaki High School boy, and was successively a member of the Land Transfer Office staff, and a solicitor at Hawera, before leaving for England in May.

By the last mail from England Mr W. P. Kirkwood received advice (says the Stratford Post) that his brother, Major James George KIRKWOOD, was out of hospital, and expected to join his regiment at an early date. Major Kirkwood, who is second in command of the 10th Gloucester's, was wounded in the big advance on Loos on September 25 last.

The Stratford Post says that Mr Charles BAYLY, of Toko, who left for England to enlist, has written to say that he has enlisted in the Exeter Yeomanry.

At least one ex-Invercargillite was with the British force which landed at Salonika and pushed through Macedonia to the Bulgarian frontier in order to assist the Serbians. This young man, who was in a local institution, left New Zealand with the main body, but obtained a commission in the 6th Leinster Regiment, with which, as part of the 10th (Irish) Division, he went to Salonika (says the Southland Times). Under date December 18 he writes to a friend in Invercargill... [Also un-named in SOUTHLAND TIMES, ISSUE 17662, 21 FEBRUARY 1916]

ASHBURTON GUARDIAN, VOLUME XXXVI, ISSUE 8392, 7 MARCH 1916
Among other New Zealanders now in England, Sergeant-Major Otto FRIEDLANDER, son of Mr Rudolph Friedlander, of Ashburton, has been recommended by Major-General Godley for a commission in the Imperial Army. Sergeant-Major Friedlander enlisted in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force (Main Body) as a private, and has worked his way up.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3234, 8 MARCH 1916
In accordance with the request of the New Zealand Defence Minister, General Godley has recommended five New Zealanders now in England for commissions in the Imperial Army. Those recommended are: Sergeant-major Otto Albert FRIEDLANDER [Royal Engineers], Sergeant Harry Elsmore HOWARD [Northumberland Fusiliers], Sergeant George Basil Lee PORTER [British West India Regiment], Sergeant Harry ERLAM [Cheshire Regiment], Trooper Alexander Ritchie STRANG [Royal Field Artillery]. The Minister has approved of the recommendations.

Cabled advice has been received that Dr William Marshall MACDONALD, of this city, who has been attached to the Solesmes Military Hospital in France, with the rank of major, for the past nine months, has been promoted in rank and appointed to the head of the physical and neurological staff of the Fourth Army, with headquarters at Le Mans.

At the conclusion of the business at the Western Taieri Land Drainage Board on the 3rd the acting-chairman (Mr C. Campbell) mentioned that this was the last meeting at which their engineer, Mr STRANG, would be present, as the board's works had been practically completed ... Mr Strang proposes to proceed to England, his intention being to offer his services to the Imperial Army authorities. Mr Strang volunteered for active service here, but failed to pass the medical examination. [OTAGO DAILY TIMES, ISSUE 16776, 18 AUGUST 1916. Mrs James STRANG, late engineer to the Western Taieri Land Drainage Board, who recently returned Home, has enlisted and is now in camp with the Royal Engineers at Chatham, Kent. Mr Strang enlisted in New Zealand, but was rejected. Immediately on arrival in England he endeavoured to join the New Zealanders but was again rejected. He then offered his services to the Imperial authorities and was at once accepted, gaining a first class pass.] [Is this him - British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920 - Acting Lance Corporal James STRANG Royal Engineers Regimental Number 159502.]

THE FIRST NEW ZEALAND-BORN SOLDIER TO ARRIVE IN FRANCE ON ACTIVE SERVICE. We have received a short note from Corporal William Bell BRIDGER (whose photograph we publish among our illustrations) forwarding a label attached to a frozen sheep sent to us at the front for our Christmas dinner. Home seemed nearer! The label is that of the Wellington Farmers' Meat Co. Ltd. Works, Taratahi. On the reverse side it is inscribed "W.F.M., Wairarapa, 407." Corporal Bridger writes: "Somewhere in France. All good wishes for 1916. The Christmas number of the Witness was received by me at the front, and has been much admired. Kia Ora ! The following is my record: Enlisted at Whitehall, August 7. 1914; arrived in France, August 16. 1914; slightly wounded January 5, 1915; invalided home (brain fever and frost-bitten toes). March 6, 1915: returned to France August 26, 1915. At front Christmas. 1915. Regret I am not permitted to state where I am or name of division. We are going to win this dreadful war - to end it we must win it. God bless you all in far off New Zealand. [Essex Territorials/Royal Army Service Corps]

The following information concerning Colonel Edmund John DAVIDSON [aka Edmund GORDON-DAVIDSON], D.S.O., has been received in Nelson (says the Mail) by his wife, Mrs Davidson: Paris, France, January 4 Madam, I have the honour to report that your husband has been taken prisoner after being slightly wounded and gassed. He, with a company of the Foreign Legion, made a heroic defence of the position, and his name has been forwarded for the cross of the Legion of Honour. He is quite safe, although a prisoner for the duration of the war. Any news will be forwarded if it is available. (Signed) Captain and Adjutant Foreign Legion. Colonel Davidson visited his parents in Nelson some time ago on leave from the Peruvian Army. It was understood that he was sent to the Italian front as an Attache with the Italian army, but he apparently resigned his position in Peru to fight with the Allies. Colonel Davidson, who is an old boy of Nelson College, saw considerable service in the Boer War, and also in the Zulu War of 1906. [Nelson College Old Boys Register 1856-1956 - 1893-94. Came from Collingwood. Served in South Africa (1899-1902) with Canadian Scouts, and in Zululand in 1906. Despatches, D.S.M, World War I Foreign Legion, Colonel D.S.O. Was later at Fort Munro, Virginia as member of U.S Artillery. XV 1894, rugby rep. Nelson 1895-96] [The Dominion, Volume 8, Issue 2300, 6 November 1914 Among the arrivals from San Francisco yesterday was Major E. Gordon Davidson, formerly of Nelson, but who has been absent from New Zealand for many years. Major Davidson was formerly an artillery officer in the American (United States) Army, but for the past seven years has been connected in a responsible capacity with the Peruvian Army, and has been acting as a member of the Frontier Commission, the duty of which is to outline the boundary between Peru and Brazil. Major Davidson is now on furlough, and intends to revisit Nelson.] [https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Davidson-3328#_note-1 -The veracity of these claims can be questioned. It seems in fact he was still stateside, as in September 1916 he married a San Francisco society lady Claire McCorkle; this marriage was annulled in 1921. There is no trace of the much travelled, oft-promoted and purportedly much decorated Mr/Major/Colonel Davidson following that. [He was married in 1915 in Rotorua to Florence MACKAY as Edmond DAVIDSON]]

An interesting letter has been received in Sydney from Mr James William Humphrys SCOTLAND, the New Zealand aviator, who was with the fighting forces in Mesopotamia. Mr Scotland states that he found the climate very trying, and got a severe heat stroke. In consequence he had gone to Puna to recuperate. As soon as he had recovered sufficiently he would return to Mesopotamia, where there was ample work to do. He mentions that in the fight at Ctesiphon, which had lasted three days, the British had taken 1300 Turks and Arab prisoners...

GREYMOUTH EVENING STAR, 10 MARCH 1916
Dr James Macintosh BELL, formerly Director of the Geological Survey, New Zealand, is now a major, in the Canadian Royal Highlanders at Montreal, and at latest mail advices was going to the front with the next Canadian contingent.
The London Gazette contains a War Office notification that Lieutenant Alan Augustus ADAMS, of the West Yorks Regiment of the Imperial Army (the Prince of Wales Own), has been promoted to a captaincy, the promotion dating from August 8th, 1915. We heartily congratulate Alan, who is a son of Mr and Mrs A. A. Adams, of Greymouth on his promotion.
Mr W. T. Jennings., M.P., has: received advice of the death of his eldest son, Lieutenant Harold William JENNINGS. Lieutenant Jennings, who was an ex-pupil of St. Patrick's College, Wellington, left the service of the Bank of New Zealand at New Plymouth some five years ago, and went to London, where he held a position in the National Bank of New Zealand. From London he went to Buenos Aires, where he was employed for two years in the British South American Bank. On the outbreak of war he and two friends proceeded to London and joined the London Scottish. Later Harold Jennings obtained a commission in the R.F.A. He took part in the battle at Loos on September 25th, and was wounded. When convalescent he was sent to Athlone (Ireland), and there contracted enteric fever. Of three sons who went on active service in the early stages of the war, Lieutenant Jennings is the second who has given his life to his country’s cause, Lance-Corporal Edgar Jennings, having been killed in action at Gallipoli.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3235, 15 MARCH 1916
The list of casualties sustained in the Mesopotamia campaign includes the name of an officer well-known in Otago, who is reported as having been wounded namely, Captain J. D. GRANT V.C. of the 1-8th Ghurka Rifles. Captain Grant, who held the local rank of major in the dominion, was a staff officer in Otago for some years, and returned to India shortly before the outbreak of war. He joined the army in 1898, and reached his present rank in the Indian army in 1907. He has held several staff appointments, and during the Tibet Expedition in 1903-4 was twice wounded. It was there that he won the V.C. during the storming of the Gyantso Jong on July 6, 1910. The storming party, under Captain Grant, made its way under a galling fire, up the precipitous rock-face, with little or no covering available. Only one could go at a time. When Captain Grant reached the top he was wounded and hurled back, with Havildar Karbir Pun, who was beside him. They fell about 30ft. Regardless of their injuries, they again scaled the breach, and, covered by the fire of the men below, were successful, and the fort was taken. Captain Grant got the V.C. and Havildar Karbir Fun was recommended for the Indian Order of Merit.

Friends and admirers of Alan Augustus ADAMS, the old University captain and Otago threequarter, will be interested to learn that when the last mail left he was back in England on leave after having seen some fighting in Gallipoli, where he was wounded. The old Royal Blue holds the rank of captain in the West Yorkshires. A London Sportsman of a recent date says: — "Formerly he [Adams] played a very good game at centre three-quarter for London Hospital and Rosslyn Park, having learn't to play in company with some of the great players of New Zealand in Otago and elsewhere."

The fears which were entertained for Lieutenant Harold William McIvor JENNINGS were confirmed last week, when his father, Mr W. T. Jennings, M.P., received advice that he had passed peacefully and painlessly away on Tuesday week. Of three sons who went on active service in the early stages of the war, Lieutenant Jennings is the second who has given his life to his country's cause, Lance-corporal Jennings having been killed in action at Gallipoli. Harold Jennings was the eldest son of the member for Taumarunui, and left New Plymouth five years ago for London. He was employed in the New Plymouth branch of the Bank of New Zealand, and took part in local amateur operatic efforts. In London he was engaged in the National Bank of New Zealand, and from there he proceeded to Buenos Aires, where he was employed for two years in the British South American Bank. At the outbreak of war he and two other friends proceeded to London, where they joined the London Scottish. He later obtained a lieutenancy in the Royal Field Artillery, and took part in the great advance on Loos on September 25, where he was wounded. After convalescence he was sent for light duty to Athlone (Ireland), where he contracted enteric fever. Lieut. Jennings was born in Auckland, and was a pupil of St. Patrick's College. [CWGC gives date of death as 29 February 1916. Buried Cornamagh Cemetery, County Westmeath, Ireland]

PRESS, VOLUME LII, ISSUE 15540, 16 MARCH 1916
Amongst New Zealanders who have been back from the front lately, is Captain Alan MACDOUGALL of the 22nd Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers, who had been established in a rather "unhealthy" sector of our elongated front since Loos. Captain Macdougall, who was one of the best known of our Rhodes Scholars at Oxford, joined the Army as soon as the war broke out, and received his promotion in June last. He likes the work, and like most men who know them, is full of admiration of the Londoner as a soldier. He early got an insight into the ramifications of the spy service within the British lines, an activity which even yet cannot be said to have been extinguished. The movement of a big gun, even under cover of darkness cannot escape notice, and before another day has passed the German artillery invariably bombards the very house in which it is hidden. An amusing incident occurred recently on the front occupied by the Fusiliers. Preparations had been made by the British to launch a gas attack against the Germans as soon as the weather served. For four nights in succession the omens were not propitious. On the fifth night everything seemed favourable, and the attack was about to be launched when a Teutonic voice was lifted up through a megaphone from the enemys trenches, which said in pleading accent; For God's sake let de gas go to-night, we haf been waiting four nights for it.
Lieutenant Cyril Robert NICHOLS, a son of Colonel Nichols, of Oamaru, is in a trench mortar battery with the 3rd Army [East Surrey Regiment]. Trench mortars, like machine-guns and aeroplanes, have acquired a certain aristocracy since the war began, and to go to them is something like going to submarines in the Navy. With the rest of the Army the trench mortar batteries are the most unpopular of people because, wherever they go, they stir the Bosch up out of his dug-outs and occasion a strafe. It was exactly a year to the day since he left his home in New Zealand that Lieutenant Nichols started for the front to join a mythical unit. After a ten-days course at the trench mortar school he was sent up to the line. The work is very interesting, but very hard owing to the physical exertion required to move guns and ammunition along trenches in their present condition, for the weather at the front has been vile for a month or two past.
Captain Harold Francis Sherwood KING [SHERWOOD-KING], of the Royal Field Artillery, is now attached to the 40th Divisional Ammunition Column at Aldershot. As long ago as 1889, Captain Sherwood King was at Sandhurst, and before going to Zealand he served in the Royal Horse Artillery. He will probably go to the front in a few months time. Captain Sherwood King was well known in newspaper circles in New Zealand, where he was associated with the business side of many different papers.
Lieutenant Cecil HUMPHRIES (Christchurch), whose service in the war dates back to the first month, and includes terms with the Army Service Corps, the Manchester Regiment, and the Highland Light Infantry, in which he now holds a commission, is back again at the front, in the portion of the line which we have recently taken over from the French. Talking of the change which has come over the face of things since he was last there, Lieutenant Humphries writes: - "Poor old Fritz gets a bad time of it these days. We have heaps of munitions, guns galore, and men everywhere. If he strafe us we give him twice as much back, and the way the tables are turning on him is simply wonderful. John Bull perhaps was asleep, but I think he had one eye open all the same, the way our Army has grown and improved. We have so many batteries that some are called retaliation batteries, and only fire when the Huns try to do a little "hate" on our lines. In my belief the greatest thing to overcome is the common old barb-wire. The enemy have in places got as much as twelve yards of thick, heavy barb in front of the trenches, and if we could get something to shift this we would be quite all right."
Residents of Fairlie, South Canterbury, will learn with regret that Lieutenant Stephen Galt TRAIL [TRAILL], R.A.M.C., has been wounded in France by shrapnel in the leg, and was crushed by his horse, which was killed at the same time. Lieutenant Trail is now in London, and has been able to leave hospital, but it is not certain yet whether or not an operation will be necessary. It is doubtful, too, whether he will be fit for foreign service again, but he is in hopes of being able to continue in some kind of Army work until the end of the war.
Mr James Dalton DINEEN [DINNEEN] (Auckland), B.A., formerly on the staff of the Auckland Grammar School, was for a time in the Royal Flying Corps, but had to give it up owing to defective eye-sight. Since then he has been in training with the Inns of Court, O.T C., has obtained a commission in the Imperial Army, and has left for the Near East.
Captain Cuthbert T. MACLEAN, Royal Fusiliers and Royal Flying Corps, has been promoted Flight Commander.

WAIRARAPA AGE, VOLUME XXXV, ISSUE 10713, 20 MARCH 1916
Eric Hector GOODFELLOW, whose death was reported in our issue of Saturday, was a son of Mrs T. Goodfellow, of Auckland, and nephew of Mrs B. H. Waddington, of Masterton. The deceased, who was twenty-three years of age, was an Auckland Grammar School boy, and went to the Edinburgh University to complete his medical course. He was known by many in Masterton, as he used to spend some of his holidays with his relatives here. He took a great interest in military matters, particularly in the artillery, and his previous colonial experience gained for him a commission in the Imperial Army. His brother, Mr Gordon Goodfellow, who was late assistant engineer to the Lyttelton Harbour Board is also at the front.

AUCKLAND STAR, VOLUME XLVII, ISSUE 69, 21 MARCH 1916
Mr. P. D. BARKER, who was formerly on the staff at Christchurch Museum, is now a member of the Scouts with the Frontiersmen in East Africa, under Colonel D. P. Driscoll. [Wikipedia - The 25th (Frontiersmen) Service Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) was a British Army unit that served during World War I. It was raised by the Legion of Frontiersmen. The battalion served in the African Theatre of the war from 1915–1918, centered mostly in the area around Lake Tanganyika, British East African and German East African territory. The unit was formed on 12 February 1915 by Lieutenant-Colonel Daniel Patrick Driscoll.]
On Friday last an interesting function took place at the Watersiders Ambulance Station on the Queen's wharf, when Mr Cooke was presented with an elaborate gold watch by Mr. Sinclair White, on behalf of the Auckland waterside workers. Mr. Cooke has been in charge of the ambulance service for some time, and Mr. White referred to the able manner in which he had carried out his duties. Mr. Cooke has left Auckland to go Home by the Tongariro. He intends offering his services to the military authorities. Mr. Cooke was captain during the South African war and is an ex-sergeant-major of the Imperial Army. The good wishes of Auckland shipping people go with Mr Cooke.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3236, 22 MARCH 1916
Private information has been received in Dunedin that Captain J. D. GRANT, V.C, better known here as Major Grant, was wounded in the leg on the 13th January, the bone being fractured, and was invalided to Bombay Hospital, where he had been for three weeks at the date of the letter giving particulars of his wound. It is probable that he will bo sent to England to recuperate.

John Ritchie Caldwell LAIDLAW, the aviator whose death was announced in yesterday's cablegrams, was a son of Mr R. Laidlaw, who was until recently in the ironmongery business in Dunedin. He was 24 years of age. He proceeded Home last August at his own expense, and entered the aviation school. Cabled advice to his relatives informed them that he received his pilot certificate on March 2, and had been accepted by the Admiralty for active service with the rank of sub-lieutenant. In Dunedin he attended the High Street School, the St. Clair School, and the Otago Boys' High School.

Mrs Rickard, of Riversdale, has received word from her son, Mr Frederick George RICKARD that he has enlisted in a Lincolnshire regiment (says the Ashburton Guardian). Since his arrival in England Mr Rickard has been engaged in munition work.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3237, 29 MARCH 1916
Cable advice has been received from Mr Kenneth Henry MILLWARD (late of the Wanganui tramways engineering staff) that he has been accepted in the Aviation Corps. Mr Millward worked his passage Home in the engine room of the R.M.S. Orari in December last.

Lieutenant Herbert Ambrose COOPER, of the Royal Flying Corps, has been promoted to a captaincy by the Imperial authorities. Captain Cooper is still on active service at the front in France. Advice to this effect has been received by his Honor Mr Justice Cooper.

Colonel Joseph Cashmore FREETH, who distinguished himself recently in an attack in East Africa, is an old Masterton boy and a son of the late Mr C. J. Freeth. He went to South Africa as a sergeant-major with the Second Contingent at the time of the Boer war.

Lieutenant James Robert BOYD, M.D., R.A.M.C. (formerly of Mataura), has been on duty at Eastbourne for a little while (says the Ensign). Now he is in London attached to the Springfield War Hospital at Wandsworth Common, but his stay there will most likely be brief, as he is under orders to proceed to the Mediterranean. Mrs Boyd will stay in Edinburgh during her husband's absence.

Writing to his parents in Waipukurau, Trooper George CHAMBERS states that Sergeant John Lauderdale Stewart RICHARDSON [aka John Lauderdale STEWART-RICHARDSON], of Waipukurau has received a commission in the Coldstream Guards.

STRATFORD EVENING POST, VOLUME XXVIV, ISSUE 97, 30 MARCH 1916
Nurse Elsie McGregor STRONACH, who served in a New Zealand Hospital in Egypt, and who has been home on furlough, has been recalled to active service and will leave Stratford to-morrow morning.
Word has been received by Nurse W J Stronach of Stratford, that her second son, Donald Grant STRONACH, who enlisted in the Imperial Army at the outbreak of the war, being in London at the time, has received a commission in the Northumberland Fusiliers.

MANAWATU TIMES, VOLUME XL, ISSUE 13364, 30 MARCH 1916
Corporal William HUGHES, late of Otaki, who was wounded in the fighting at Flanders, and is now at Kinnell Park (North Wales), writes that he is making a good recovery from his wound, which was, at time of writing (Feb. 16th) nearly well. He was in charge of the officers mess, and was doing the catering. He expected to leave for New Zealand in April, and arrive in Auckland by the Remuera in May. Corporal Hughes has been 16 years in the Imperial Army, his time expiring on the 23rd March, and he will be glad, after doing his best, of a rest in New Zealand. [Imperial Reservist][The King's (Shropshire Light Infantry) Corporal No 5998]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3238, 5 APRIL 1916
On Christmas Day, at Fulham Parish Church, Leonard William TOSSWILL, second lieutenant 9th Battalion Warwickshire Regiment, only son of Mrs Tosswill, of Christchurch, was married to Miss Doris Mary Chilman, only daughter of Mr C. W. Chilman, of Wellington. The ceremony was performed bv the Rev. E. Davis. An old boy of Waitaki High School, Mr Tosswill came from New Zealand as sergeant in the Fourth Reinforcements, and was wounded at Gallipoli in the August fighting. He was promoted from corporal to a commission in the Imperial army, and was gazetted to the Warwickshire Regiment last October.

Mr Leslie Gordon LILLY, lieutenant Westminster Dragoons (late of Dunedin), was married on December 18, at St. George's, Bloomsbury, to Miss Maude Elizabeth Harrop, only daughter of Alderman Harrop, J.P., ex-Lord Mayor of Manchester, and Mrs Harrop, of Heaton Lodge, Heaton, Mersey. The ceremony was performed by Bishop Welldon. Since his marriage, Lieutenant Lilly has left for Egypt.

Callers at the High Commissioner's Office since Christmas have included: Lieutenant Reginald Marcus STERNDALE (1st Loyal North Lancs.), Mr Robert James ROBERTSON (Inns of Court, O.T.C., Fairlie), Corporal Charles Hagestadt Arthur SIMPSON (Motor Transport, A.S.C., Wanganui).

Mr James STRANG, who has acted as engineer to the Western Taieri Drainage Board for seven years, left Mosgiel on Friday, en route for the Home Country, where he intends to enlist in an engineering company. Mr Strang has proved himself a most capable and obliging official of the board, and, while expressing regret at his departure, all join in wishing him bon voyage.

The friends of the late Rev. Dr Nicholson, of Ravensbourne and St. Leonards, and of Mrs Nicolson, now of Babbacombe, Torquay, England, will learn with much regret that their eldest son, Major William Hurst NICOLSON, of the Indian Army, has been killed in action at Mesopotamia. The following from the Morning Post, London, are the particulars of the line record of this officer: Major William Hurst Nicolson, 37th Dogras, was the eldest son of Mrs Nicolson of St. Margaret's, Babbacombe, Torquay, and of the late Rev. William Millar Nicolson, D.Sc, Edinburgh. Major Nicolson, who was 45 years of age, obtained his commission in May, 1892 and was promoted in the following October. In July, 1896, he transferred to the Indian Army, in which he received his captaincy in July, 1901, and his majority in May, 1910. For a period of nine years, from March, 1901, he was employed with the King's African Rifles. Before this he saw service on the North-West Frontier in 1897-8, and was present at the action at Malakand. He had the medal with clasp for that service, and he received another clasp for the Tirah campaign, in which he was assistant transport officer to the 5th Brigade. During his service in British East Africa he fought in the operations against the Ogaden Somalis, and some years later he was at Nandi [sic]. The East Africa medal with two clasps was awarded him.

Flight-lieutenant James William Humphrys SCOTLAND, invalided from Mesopotamia, returned to New Zealand by the Maitai today Eight members of the crew of H.M.S. Pyramus also came back by the same boat.

Lieutenant Maxwell RAMSAY, R.A.M.C., who is attached as medical officer to the Second Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers, has been promoted to the rank of captain.

A letter (dated February 7) from Lieutenant-Alexander Manson Moncrieff FINLAYSON, South Lancashire Regiment, states that after six months training in the various departments of military work and in the training of recruits, he passed a brigade examination — a practical test lasting a week, which all officers in the brigade have to pass before going to the front. He adds: "I am now waiting my turn. I hope it won't be very long, because the present work is pretty dull and monotonous. The war is quiet just now, but there are indications of a big burst-up on the west front shortly, in which case I will probably get orders to be off."

Mr T. Jordan, solicitor, of Masterton, has received word from his brother, Mr Michael Joseph JORDAN, that he has won Iris spurs in Flanders (says the Wairarapa Times). Mr Jordan resigned from the engineer service of the New Zealand Shipping Company at London. He declined a commission in the Royal Engineers, and went as a private with the British reinforcements to France in April, 1915. He spent eight months at Ypres, and escaped unscathed, being personally commended for services in the field by Lieutenant-general Allenby, Brigadiers general Hoskins and Petrie, and recommended for a commission in three branches of the service —viz: artillery, infantry, and Army Ordnance Corps He gained his commission in the Army Ordnance Corps, was promoted to first lieutenant, and sent Home to the Woolwich Ordnance College for special instruction. He has now been appointed an inspector of ordnance with the rank of captain, and expects to go to Salonika with heavy siege gun batteries.

Major Henry John MCLEAN, of the R.A.M.C., who was for many months on active service at Gallipoli, cabled to his sister, Miss McLean, principal of the Wellington Girls' College, that he was leaving by the Maheno (says the Post). After receiving a bullet wound in the shoulder, which penetrated to the lung, he was removed to a hospital ship and taken to the " Blue Sisters" Hospital in Malta, where he received excellent nursing. While there he had an interview with Lord Methuen. Later on Major M'Lean was taken to England, suffering from joint rheumatism, which so crippled him that he was obliged to use crutches. He was first at Endsleigh Palace, and afterwards at Buxton Hydro for treatment, and was sufficiently recovered to walk without help.

Mrs MacDuff Boyd, of Hastings, received word to-day that her son, Stuart Wavel BOYD, third officer on the Persia, lost his life when the vessel was torpedoed on December 30. The news came as a severe shock to his parents, who believed him to be on the transport Dongola. Mr Boyd was at one time in the service of the Tyser Line on the Star of Australia.

Mr Henry Wilfred BUNDLE, of Dunedin, intends to proceed to England shortly for the purpose of enlisting. Mr Bundle, it will be remembered, passed the Medical Board in Dunedin some time ago, and after he had disposed of his interest in a local legal firm, went to Trentham, where the examining board rejected him.

A notable instance of the readiness with which some families have responded to the call of the Empire has come under notice of the Oamaru Mail. The Rev. Hugh Corrie Frere, some years ago was incumbent of the Episcopalian Church at Kurow. At that time Mr Frere took a very keen interest in the Volunteer Force, and was a chaplain to the North Otago Mounted Rifles. He is now rector of Roydon, near Diss, in England, and seems to have lost none of his zeal for service to his country, for he is at present serving as a special constable. But what is more to the point even than this is that he has five sons serving the Empire in various capacities and different localities. Allan Gray FRERE, who served through the Boer war with the 6th Dragoon Guards and the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, gaining two medals and six clasps, is a captain in the 86th Carnatic Regiment; Owen Gray FRERE, who served 10 years in the Natal Mounted Police, is now in the British East African Police; Noel Gray FRERE is District Commissioner in Sierra Leone; Eric Gray FRERE is serving in the Royal North-west Mounted Police of Canada; and Jasper Gray FRERE is a lieutenant in the Suffolk Regiment, serving at the front with the 4th Battalion and in charge of the machine guns since October, 1914.

News of the Philomel has been received by the Defence Minister, and the news is all good. The ship has lately been visited by inspecting officers of the Navy, who have made the most complimentary remarks about the condition of the ship and the men in their report on the ship. The inspectors said "She was very clean and efficient for her age. The ship's company were keen and well dressed, and appeared to be a very fine body of men, and a credit to New Zealand." The commander also communicates a story of splendid bravery by one of the crew. "I have the honour and pleasure," he writes, "to bring to your notice the conduct of able seaman Frank KIVELL (a volunteer from New Zealand for the war). On an occasion when a cutter from a ship in my command was recently swamped while attempting to communicate with the shore at --. Communication was urgently necessary, and the boat was told to anchor outside the surf and to endeavour to communicate by native surf canoes. Soon after the boat was anchored, in about 14ft of water, a succession of steep waves completely swamped her, and the canoes coming off were capsized, and the majority of the men were washed out, and had to swim for the shore in a heavy-breaking surf, able seaman Kivell being amongst the number. Able seaman Anderson, who was attending to the anchor, is a weak swimmer, and was left in the boat. He was severely buffeted, and was washed right along to the stern of the boat. He had entirely lost his head, and he states that he knows very little of what happened. Seeing this when he got ashore, able seaman Kivell at once started for Anderson's relief. The heavy breakers made this a very hazardous proceeding, which the srongest swimmers in the crew state they would not care to have undertaken. On his way off to the boat Kivell found able seaman Castel in difficulties, the latter having endeavoured to float ashore on a mast, and having got his foot entangled in rope gear. Kivell dived and cleared Castel's foot, but was struck by the mast on coming to the surface. Notwithstanding this, he proceeded to the boat, and rescued Anderson, who was helpless, and who made things much more difficult by clutching Kivell by the neck and nearly drowning him. However, he successfully brought Anderson ashore in an unconscious condition. "I consider it was entirely due to this man's pluck and perseverance in very difficult circumstances that no lives were lost. I recommend that his services be recognised in the usual manner by the award of a lifesaving medal."

PRESS, VOLUME LII, ISSUE 15558, 6 APRIL 1916
Prior to proceeding with business the meeting [Lyttelton Borough Council] adjourned in order to say au revoir to Mr Nicol James WEBSTER, assistant borough engineer, who is proceeding to London to offer his services to the Imperial Army authorities. [Army Ordnance Corps]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3239, 12 APRIL 1916
Prior to the conclusion of the City Council meeting on the 5th, his Worship the Mayor mentioned the fact that Councilor John Sutherland SINCLAIR was about to proceed to England with the object of offering his services to the Imperial authorities. Cr Sinclair had offered his services here, but had been turned down, and his desire to assist in the war was so great that he had decided to make a great sacrifice in order to do so. He hoped that Cr Sinclair would be spared to return to the city after the bells of peace had rung out and this terrible war had come to an end...

Captain William Aiken FAIRCLOUGH, R.A.M.C. who is attached to the hospital ship Marama, has written to Mr C. J. Parr, M.P., stating that he has visited England. Captain Fairdough said he had inspected English, Australian, and Indian hospital ships, but preferred the Marama to them all.

Word has been received that Captain Charles John SMITH, formerly commanding the Ranfurly Rifle Volunteers, Napier, has received a commission in the 8th South African Infantry Regiment, which comprises part of the forces now fighting under General Smuts in German East Africa. Captain Smith saw service in the Boer war with the Fifth and Eighth New Zealand Contingents. For some years he resided in German South-West Africa, and on the outbreak of hostilities was interned as a prisoner of war, remaining in the hands of the enemy until General Botha received the surrender of the German forces at Windhoek last year. Two other New Zealanders also hold commissions in the same regiment as Captain Smith.

An interesting letter has been received from Mr Duncan Forrest BAUCHOP, who left the Christchurch Technical College in June to offer himself for war work at Home (says the Press). He was for some months in charge of a department of the Ministry of Munitions, and has since received a commission as engineer-lieutenant, and quartered at the Royal Naval Barracks, Portsmouth. He has recently been appointed instructor at the Royal Naval College at Osborne, an important and honourable post.

By his daring and effective attack on the Zeppelin raider, Lieutenant Alfred de Bath BRANDON, the New Zealander, has eclipsed the famous exploit of the late gallant Lieutenant Warneford, who was the first airman to accomplish the destruction of a Zeppelin. Warneford's attack was delivered in the daytime, Brandon's at night, at a much greater altitude, and under much more dangerous conditions. Sub-lieutenant Brandon is a son of Mr A. de B. Brandon, of Wellington. He is 32 years of age, and went Home last year for the purpose of entering the Aviation Corps. He attended the Flying School at Hendon, and the Military School at Harrow, and received his commission in the Royal Flying Corps later. He is a Wellington College boy, and later attended Cambridge University. Before the war he was a member of the legal firm of Brandon, Hislop, and Brandon. In the course of the last letter to his father Lieutenant Brandon stated that he had just obtained his commission, and was waiting for it to be gazetted. He was then at the Military Aviation School at Harrow, where he had been engaged in flying experiments with a new model of an aeroplane, known as the "Avro" machine. As is well known, the aeroplane (biplane and monoplane), has been at a disadvantage as compared with the "Zeppelin" airship, owing to the fact that these great "clippers of the clouds" could rise or fall practically vertically, whilst the aeroplane has to mount in spiral circles. The advantage of the "Avro" type of aeroplanes is that, though still a thing of planes, it can ascend in shorter circles, and therefore much quicker than other types of British machines. The "Avro" can climb vertically at the rate of between 50 and 60 miles an hour, and has a speed of 70 miles an hour when flying horizontally. It is this type of aeroplane that Lieutenant Brandon had been given the opportunity of experimenting with, which points to the probability that it was in one of these new machines that he made his sensational attack on the Zeppelin. A number of members of the legal profession in Wellington sent a cablegram to Flight Sub-lieutenant A. de B. Brandon congratulating him upon having surmounted and bombed a Zeppelin.

An interesting, though brief, account of operations against the enemy in the heart of Africa is given by Gunner Alfred NEAVE, of the Mounted Machine gun section, Nyasaland Imperial Service Contingent, in a letter to his parents in Christchurch. The contingent travelled by transport from Capetown to the port of Chindio, and then went up the Zambesi River in paddle steamers for a distance of about 200 miles, passing through plantations of tea, coffee, tobacco, and cotton. At a settlement called Chindio the men disembarked and took train to Limbe, where the Scotch settlers greeted the soldiers with the greatest enthusiasm. From Limbe the troops travelled to Zamba, where a rest was made for a day or two. Travelling was not easy, for horses cannot live in the climate, and journeys have to be made on foot. Each man has a boy to carry his kit, and native boys also carry machine guns and provisions. For a force of less than 300 there were 500 carriers. From Karanga, north of Zamba, the force went out on patrol and had a brush with the Germans. For a while the engagement was lively, but owing to the high firing of the enemy, only one man, a native scout, was injured.

SOUTHLAND TIMES, ISSUE 17707, 13 APRIL 1916
Mr Norman Alexander Wellington WALLIS, son of Mr A R Wallis, Invercargill, who went Home in October to join the Imperial Army, has passed his examination for entrance into Woolwich and has been granted a commission in the Royal Artillery.

STAR, ISSUE 11675, 15 APRIL 1916
Mr Alec Noel Hawkes WHITCOMBE, of Christchurch, who arrived in London on February 7 by the ill-fated Maloia came over to offer his services to the War Office and is shortly going through a course of training with the Royal Horse Artillery at the St John's Wood Barracks.
Lieutenant-Commander Reginald H. MOORHOUSE, R.N.R., of Cambridge, arrived in London by the Ruapehu on February 17 to offer his services to the Admiralty. He is at present staying with his brother-in-law at Home Place, Limpsfield, in Surrey.
Mr Arthur Courtenay Philip BACK, of Lyttelton, who came over from South Africa when war broke out and joined 2nd King Edward's Horse, spent nine months in the trenches in France and received a bullet wound in the shoulder some three months ago. He is now in England studying for a commission in the Imperial Army and is going to a Cadet School at Cambridge next week.
Mr William Harold POWELL, of Wellington, who is shortly going into training for a commission in the Garrison Artillery, is at present staying with his cousin, General Sir Francis Thomas, K.C.B., at Rochester. He is then going on to visit Bodrain Castle ruins, which once belonged to Sir Nathaniel Powell, and from there to Edinburgh for a brief visit.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3240, 19 APRIL 1916
The following members of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force are the January nominees for commissions in the Imperial Forces: 4/15a—C.S.M. Otto Albert FRIEDLANDER, Divisional Engineers [Royal Engineers], 10/380 Sergeant Harry Elsmore HOWARD, Wellington Battalion [Northumberland Fusiliers], 6/112 Sergeant George Basil Lee PORTER, Canterbury Battalion [British West India Regiment], 12/94 Sergeant Harry ERLAM, Auckland Battalion [Cheshire Regiment], 11/170 Trooper Alexander Ritchie STRANG, Wellington Mounted Rifles Regiment [Royal Field Artillery]. The following are the February nominations: - 3/718 Sergeant Alexander Edward Wrottesley SALT, New Zealand Medical Corps [Manchester Regiment]. 5/25 Driver Oswald John MARSH, New Zealand Army Service Corps [Royal Army Service Corps], 6/12 Aro Keith BAKER, Canterbury Infantry Battalion [Killed in action 09 July 1916 with NZEF], 11/860 Private Bertram Isold BRISCO, Wellington Mounted Rifles Brigade [Does not appear to have transferred], 7/642 Trooper Gerald Homewood ANDERSON, Canterbury Mounted Rifles Brigade [Machine Gun Corps].

Some time ago Cr John Sutherland SINCLAIR volunteered in Dunedin for active service, but did not pass the medical test, and consequently his services were not accepted. However, feeling that he might be of some service to his King and country, he decided to make a great sacrifice and to go Home and to offer his services to the Imperial authorities. Reference was made to this fact at the last meeting of the City Council, when a resolution appreciating the stop he had taken was passed by the council...

His Excellency the Governor has received a telegram informing him that his brother, Captain (Brevet Major) The Hon. Josceline C. W. Savile FOLJAMBE of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (of which regiment he was adjutant), was killed in action on April 6. Captain Foljambe was born in 1882. He joined the Northumberland Fusiliers in January,1902, and when two battalions of that regiment were disbanded in 1908 he was transferred to the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. He was promoted to captain in April, 1914. The late Captain Foljambe visited New Zealand in April, 1914, and took the opportunity of meeting the 6th Haurakis when in camp at Cambridge (the Hauraki Regiment is allied to the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry). Captain Foljambe was severely wounded on November 22 during operations at Kut-el-Amara, but returned to duty on December 31.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3241, 26 APRIL 1916
Mr Norman Alexander Wellington WALLIS, son of Mr A. R. Wallis, of Invercargill, who went Home in October last to join the Imperial Army, has passed his examination for entrance into Woolwich, and has been granted a commission in the Royal Artillery.

The Wanganui Herald reports that Mr Donald Anderson LAWRIE, who was an engineer on the minesweeper Hythe when she was sunk in a collision off Gallipoli, and who is now on the mine-sweeper Jupiter, reports himself well, in a letter to his father (Mr W. B. Lawrie, of Gonville). He says: This job is far better than the Hythe. We go out sweeping through the day and come in at night. Our speed is 20 knots, and we only draw 6ft in depth, so everything is in our favour. They only want the Zeppelins over there and every young chap would join up. I could not come home until this is all over, and that time seems a long way off. When he wrote Mr Lawrie was studying hard, as he intended sitting at an early date for his chief engineer's certificate.

The Eltham correspondent of the Taranaki Herald states that Mr Harold WILKINSON, son of Mr Wilkinson, M.P., who has been studying medicine in England, has joined the colours. [Royal Field Artillery Special Reserve].

Mr and Mrs H. Buxton, of Ryal Bush, have received cable advice (says the Southland Times) that their son, Noel BUXTON, has been promoted to a sub-lieutenancy in the British Navy. Lieutenant Buxton, who held the rank of first officer (mercantile marine), enlisted in Sydney some nine months ago, and saw considerable service in Gallipoli.

Mr Alfred Wedderburn BISHOP, barrister and solicitor, of Christchurch, will leave for England by the Turakina on May 6 from Wellington, with a view to entering an officers' training camp.

Mr John Athol NICOL, son of Mr R. Nicol, Waimate, has been appointed a lieutenant engineer [Royal Navy]. Mr Nicol, who has been in London for some time, will proceed to his duties somewhere in the locality of Suez.

Mr Benjamin, of Christchurch, has received a cable message from the Secretary of State for War, stating that his daughter, Sister Kate Elizabeth BENJAMIN, who was for many years on the staff of the Christchurch Hospital, and who went to the front some time ago, is now a patient in No. 19 General Hospital, Alexandra. The message does not state the nature of the complaint from which Sister Benjamin is suffering. [Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service]

Mr Gerald Lovat STEAD, the well-known North Canterbury runholder and racehorse owner, has enlisted (says the Christchurch Sun) in the artillery. [EVENING POST, VOLUME XCIII, ISSUE 21, 24 JANUARY 1917. Mr Gerald Stead, who has been twice rejected for active service, offered his services to the Defence Department this morning without pay for the duration of the war, in any work the Department thought he could do.]

Lieutenant James Wynyard DAVISON of the 8th Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, returned for a month to New Zealand by the Turakina (says the Christchurch Press). Lieutenant Davison was with his regiment in Serbia, where they suffered heavy losses defending certain mountain passes, was with many others invalided to Malta, where he was for some time in hospital. On reaching England eventually he applied for, and was granted, four months furlough. He will return to England and his regiment by the Turakina.

Mr Frank SIMON, son of Mr Thomas Simon, well known in Invercargill business circles, is now serving with his regiment, the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, in which he holds a lieutenant's commission (says the Southland News). Lieutenant Simon was a pupil at the Middle School, receiving a secondary education at the Southland Boys' High School, where he distinguished himself both as a scholar and as an athlete. Ho commenced his university career at the Otago University, but left the dominion about five years ago to study medicine in Trinity College, Dublin. Lieutenant Simon answered the call right at the commencement of hostilities, and for some time trained with a regiment of Grenadiers in England. Returning to Ireland, he was made adjutant of a training camp, and a short time afterwards received a commission in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, with which regiment he is now serving in France.

News has been received of the death of Lieutenant Harper Mervyn LEPPER, third son of Mr and Mrs H. B. Lepper, of Lepperton (says the Taranaki Herald). Lieutenant Lepper was killed in action in the great battle on April 9. After a period of training in England his battalion was sent to the front in Flanders, where he greatly distinguished himself, and gained the Military Cross, the greatest honour next to the Victoria Cross. The Gazette describes the deed which secured him this distinction as follows: Lieutenant Harper Mervyn Lepper, 4th Battalion, Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment), has been awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry on July 20, 1915, at Hooge, when, during a heavy bombardment, part of his trench was blown in and communication with the next battalion was lost. He extended his platoon through the ruins, and, although twice wounded, remained at his post, keeping up communication and sending in accurate information of the situation... On recovering from his wounds, Lieutenant Lepper received his Military Cross from the hands of the King, and subsequently went with his regiment to Egypt, where he was acting-captain and adjutant. News was received some weeks ago that he had left for the front, and now his death is reported.

News has been received from England that Private John Henry SWALES, of Rakaia, has been invalided Home from East Africa, and has now been discharged from his regiment, the 25th Fusiliers, as unfit for further service. Private Swales went Home in February, 1915, and enlisted in the Legion of Frontiersmen, which was afterwards transformed into the 25th Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers, which was sent to East Africa. He took part in the fight for the capture of Bukoba, where two New Zealanders (Privates C. F. Pedersen and Henderson [?]) lost their lives. Shortly after this Private Swales was attacked with fever, and was subsequently invalided Home, and sent to Torquay Red Cross Hospital. He was in London for a few days, and is believed to have left for New Zealand by the Remuera, which sailed on March 24. [EVENING POST, VOLUME LXXXIX, ISSUE 95, 23 APRIL 1915 Mr J. H. Swales, of the New Zealand Public Works Department, who is well known in Rakaia, has joined the B Battalion Royal Fusiliers. This regiment is commanded by Colonel Driscoll, and is known as the Legion of Frontiersmen Battalion. Private Swales was too old to enlist in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, so he came Home by the Tongariro, arriving early in February, and, being an old Navy man, he found no difficulty in joining Colonel Driscolls force. It is thought that they are for special service in East Africa, and they may leave shortly.]

Mrs W. E Taylor, of Roslyn, has received letters from officers of the 1st Border Regiment, giving particulars of the death of her son, Lieutenant John Macdonald TAYLOR, who, having left New Zealand as a member of the Main Expeditionary Force, subsequently obtained a commission in the Home forces. Captain Farrell, officer commanding C Company, 1st Border Regiment, 87th Brigade, 29th Division, writes: "I was standing next to Lieutenant Macdonald Taylor when he met his death...."

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3242, 3 MAY 1916
A New Zealand Times representative has been supplied with a most interesting list of the masters and officers of the Union Company's service who have enlisted for active service: — Gone to the United Kingdom to join His Majesty's Navy; Captains Alan Ernest CAIN, R.N.R., Alexander Frederick WATCHLIN, R.N.R., Messrs A. H ROBERTSON, G. FERGUSON, J. C. BARNETT, R. BREEN, A. J. R. BARR, E. DOOLIN, W. H. WATT, R.N.R., B. F. CARRINGTON, F. W. BARON, E. J. HALES, A. FORSON, F.A.C. HISLOP, W.W. FISH, A.S.L. NAYLER, A. W. BEARDSELL, G. W. WHITTON, J. W. BUNDRED, R. H. BAIGNET. Granted leave to join the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces — Wounded at Dardanelles: Messrs E. C. SARGINSON, C.H. CAMPBELL, A. COOK, G.A.HERBERT, Captain D.W.D. BOLD, A.B.SIZAR, A.D.CRISP, D.W. NICHOLAS. Killed in action — V.J. HAY. Returned medically unfit — Mr J. H. MILLAR. On active service — Messrs J. B. SEATON, D. O'HARA, W. F. SUCKLING, W. S. GILPIN, L. W. BELL, A. C. PARKER, C.J.T. HATFIELD, R.C. JOHNSTON, J.SCRIVINER, R.CLARK, A.H.SCALES, R.T.INGRAM, J.F.JAUNAY, C. McLEOD, W. G. HASTIE, L. D. CLARK. Serving with the Navy — Mr E. F. WATSON. R.N.R. Joined the Australian Forces — Messrs G. B. MORGAN (wounded), W A. BEASLEY, J. JICKELL, P. S. MACDONALD, M. C. LANGDALE, C. J. HACKWORTH, N. J. SIEPEN, K. A. DITCHEM (reported sick), M. N. JOHNSTONE, N. CAMPBELL, H. J. CLARE. Joined the Australian Navy — Messrs W McINTYRE, R. W. B FARMER. Joined the Australian land force; — Messrs E. J. HALL, H. W. SMITH and E C.BUGBY.

Mr Harry BARKER, who went from Gisborne to England, with the object of offering his services for the war, has written stating that he volunteered to drive for transport in France, to be attached to artillery, but found it a much more difficult matter than he expected to get acceptance (says the Poverty Bay Herald). He was told by the Transport Department that it was not taking anyone unless he had been two years driving a bus or a van and two years as a mechanic, and a good letter he had from the High Commissioner did not avail to secure him an appointment. Mr Barker, failing to get with the transport service, decided to go into the officers' training corps. Mr Richard BARKER, on arrival Home, volunteered for transport work in England.

Seaman William LUMLEY of H.M.S. Pyramus. a nephew of the Rev. W. Ready, has taken part in several minor bombardments during the past 18 months, and was severely wounded while in action "somewhere in the Near East." During the operations of the Pyramus for over a month the thermometer registered 120 degrees in the shade, and the heat was almost unbearable (reports the Wellington Post). Seaman Lumley, who was invalided home, has recovered. He will subsequently enlist in the army. [1NZEF 268767]

STAR, ISSUE 11693, 9 MAY 1916
Mr M. Cook, of Leighton Street, Avonside, has received advice that his brother, Corporal J. COOK, of the Imperial Army, has been mentioned in Battalion Orders for bravery in connection with the rescue of a comrade in the Tigris. Corporal Cook, who is well-known in Christchurch swimming circles, enlisted at Home.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3243, 10 MAY 1916
Second Lieutenant Samuel Howard ELLIS (Northumberland Fusiliers) has been transferred to the Royal Flying Corps, Military Wing. Mr Ellis belongs to Auckland.

Dr Walter FELL (Wellington), who obtained a commission in the R.A.M.C. last June, immediately on arrival here, is now on board the Mauretania. In October he was in the Mediterranean on the hospital ship Hunslet. Dr William Cochran BURNS, lieutenant R.A.M.C, has relinquished his commission.

Colonel Walter WRIGHT, an old Dunedin boy and an old boy of the Otago Boys' High School, was warmly congratulated this week by Field-marshal Lord French, General Sir Archibald Hunter, and General Sir Francis Howard on the occasion of a visit to the headquarters gymnasia at Aldershot. When war broke out the gymnastic staff of the army was automatically dispersed, the officers and instructors rejoining their regiments in the fighting line; but within three weeks Colonel Wright was ordered to reorganise tho whole thing and form a new staff. He did this by re-enlisting old graduates of the school who had left the service, wounded men who had returned from the front and candidates selected by commanding officers from their battalions. By compressing a four months curriculum into 21 days, the school can now train 6000 regimental instructors per annum, as compared with 360 before the war. In view of the great enrollment of civilians in the new armies, the work of the instructors became of supreme importance, especially as hand-to-hand fighting developed. Canada has adopted Colonel Wright's scheme of training.

Mr James George HARP (Frankton Junction), formerly an engineer of tho Orari, came to England under engagement to Messrs Vickers Maxim and Co., and was sent at once to their aeroplane works at Crayford, Kent, where he is now employed making rudders for the fighting machines. Mr Harp lost a brother at the Dardanelles, and when the war is over he hopes to go to Lemnos to exhume and take home the body of another New Zealand friend. He is in England purely as a volunteer.

Dr William James PORTEOUS (Dunedin) arrived on February 19 by the Remuera (accompanied by his wife and two children). Two days later he accepted a commission as temporary lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps. His work will begin on March 1, and he expects to be posted to the Southern Command in England for a few months.

Mr William Braithwaite MANSON (Dunedin), who joined the London Scottish recently, has just been notified by the Royal Academy of Music that he has been awarded the Battison Haynes prize for composition — a trio for piano, violin, and cello.

Mr Frank HOLMES (Timaru), who has been with the Royal Naval Division for more than a year past, in charge of the transport, is now a major. Ho went to the Dardanelles at the time of the first landing.

Mr Donald Ernest HARKNESS (Nelson) completed his course of training in flying at Eastchurch in December, having received his commission as a flight lieutenant in the Royal Naval Air Service the previous month. He is now stationed at the war station at Dover. Lieutenant Harkness was in town for a few days this week.

Mr James McBeath CALDER (Dunedin), who returned to England after spending seven or eight years in West Africa, is now a lieutenant in the Royal Indian Marine, and goes to the East, probably the Persian Gulf, early next month. He is at present in town, with another Dunedin boy, Mr John Williams McLAREN who has been for six years past attached to the naval base at Rosyth. Mr McLaren graduated in engineering at the University of Glasgow. [UK, Civil Engineer Records, 1820-1930 Name: John Williams McLaren Birth Date: 28 May 1884 Nationality: British (English) Residence: H M Dockyard Rosyth MB Record Type: Proposal Event Date: 15 Nov 1911 Certificate and Year Range: 13601-13800 (1911 Dec - 1912 Apr)]

Lieutenant William Joseph SIM, LLB., of the 3rd Battalion, the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, is stationed at Edinburgh. He was a member of the First New Zealand Force, which occupied Samoa.

Lieutenant Eric Aubrey Hawkes WHITCOMBE (Royal Field Artillery) has been acting for some time as adjutant to his brigade at Salonika.

Miss Agnes ALLAN, matron of the Waiapu Hospital, came to England on leave, with the object of engaging in military nursing. She has for some months been attached to the Military Hospital at York, and is now on furlough in London, recovering from a mild attack of pleurisy. She expects to return to York next week. Her sister (Miss Jean ALLAN) is still nursing at the Military Hospital at Gibraltar.

Miss Taplin ALLMAN (Palmerston North) arrived by the Remuera to do military nursing, probably under the St. John Ambulance Association.

Mr J. A. G. WILSON [?] (Palmerston North) is a recent arrival. He is hoping to get into one of the munition works.

First-class Petty Officer Robert Hunter PATERSON, of the Scott Maxim Section R.N. Air Service, was at Suvla Bay from the landing till the evacuation of December 20. He is now trying for a commission in the R.N.A.S. He tells me that his intimate knowledge of the New Zealand bush stood him in good stead at Gallipoli. Mr Paterson was for some time on Little Barrier Island, whither he imported the first kiwis. He came to England in 1913 in connection with some patents, and joined the Scott Maxim section when war broke out.

Sergeant John Bertram PARKS, Grenadier Guards, is gazetted to a commission in the Essex Regiment, but he has been seconded for duty in the field with the New Zealand Forces.

Second Lieutenant Rudolph Dunstan [Rollo] VAVASOUR, R.F.A. (Blenheim), who obtained his commission about the middle of 1915, is now a flying officer of the R.F.C., military wing.

Mr Frank HAYTER (South Canterbury), who has seen many months service in France with King Edward's Horse, is in London awaiting a commission. Before, being gazetted, however, he will probably have to do four months training as a military cadet, under the new War Office scheme.

It is mentioned that two young New Zealanders — Messrs Fred NICHOLS [?] and Henry BENGE (Greytown) have received commissions in the Royal Flying Corps.

Lieutenant Thomas Frederick CORKILL, R.A.M.C. (Wellington), has passed his final examination in medicine at Edinburgh; and another young New Zealand medical student, who has just got through at Edinburgh with first-class honours, is Mr William BROWNLIE, M.A., B.Sc. (Invercargill). He intends trying for a commission in the R.A.M.C.

Mr Robert Allen GUMMER (Auckland) was in Canada when war broke out. He joined the Army Service Corps, in Toronto, and arrived in England last month. He is at Lee, awaiting instructions.

Mr Alexander Hugh AITKEN has joined the Royal Engineers. He was in Waihi at one time as a mining engineer, but went to the Philippines seven years ago. He reached London quite recently.

Mr Edward Arthur WESTWOOD is driving a motor ambulance attached to the Imperial forces somewhere in France. He is the son of Mr W. Westwood (Epsom, Auckland), and an old boy of Wellington College and the Auckland Grammar School. He was in the United States when war was declared, studying at the North-western University, Chicago.

Second Lieutenants Lionel Martyn ABRAHAM (Palmerston North) and Warwick James SMEETON (Auckland) have been promoted first lieutenants. Both are in the Royal Field Artillery.

Staff-sergeant Geoffrey W. A. HORTON [Geoffrey Haliburton HORTON ?] (Auckland), of Divisional Head-quarters New Zealand and Australian Division, has come to England from Egypt at the request of the Secretary of State for the Colonies, to take up a position under the Minister of Munitions. He is at present spending a fortnight's leave in Cornwall.

Lance-sergeant Philip Hastings MCDOUALL (Dunedin), who has been for some time with the 2nd King Edward's Horse, has been transferred to the Royal Engineers with the commission of temporary second lieutenant.

Mr Francis GOWARD-WEBSTER (Wellington), who holds a commission in the Royal Garrison Artillery, is stationed for the present at Woolwich.

The High Commissioner his received the following letter from New Zealanders and Australians interned in Ruhleben camp: "Absender: J. H. JONES, Barracks No. 2, Box 18. January 29, 1916. Dear Sir, Australasians in Ruhleben send their heartiest congratulations. The New Zealand parcels have arrived regularly up to date. The undersigned gentlemen send their best thanks and wishes: — Tom SULLIVAN, F. GODFREY, L. CARR, W. MORRIS, E. TUCKEY, J. R. WEBB, L. E. J. SULLIVAN, H. G. HUNT, A. H. JONES, T. H. S. BIRANGI [?], W. MORRISON. P.S. Should so like some butter."

Missing — Believed Killed. This is the announcement appearing in to-day's casualty list above the name of Captain Ernest Tristem Rupert CARLYON, 10th Battalion Sherwood Foresters. He was an old boy of Wanganui, and latterly was a student at Pembroke College, Cambridge. Early in the war he was given a commission, and in September was gazetted to the Sherwood Foresters, and in November of last year he received the temporary rank of captain in this service battalion. In July, Captain Carlyon was admitted B.K. (by proxy) of Cambridge University. [He did not die until 20 July 1941 - see CWGC]

Mr Francis Gordon PAYNE, who has been studying to qualify as a civil engineer, is leaving New Zealand by the Turakina to join the colours in England. He hopes to bo enrolled in the Royal Engineers after spending some little time with his parents, who are at present in London. Mr Payne is the only son of Mr F. W. Payne, the well-known consulting engineer of Dunedin.

News has been received of the death of Lieutenant Walter Alexander CLIFF-MCCULLOCH, who was killed in action in Flanders on February 27. For some time he was with Mr H. Balfour-Kinnear, at Kumeroa, near Woodville, and then took a farm in the King Country, away in the back-blocks. On coming out for a holiday late in August, 1914, he learnt that war had been declared, and enlisted without returning to his farm. [7th Bn Royal Irish Rifles]. Lieutenant John Gordon CLIFF-MCCULLOCH, now on the Maloja, is one of his three brothers, who also have been in action.[Royal Naval Reserve].

A recent honours list in the London Gazette contained the notification that Lieutenant-commander George Hamilton DENNISTOUN, R.N., had been made a member of the Distinguished Service Order for his services on the occasion of the destruction of the German gunboat Hermann von Wissmann at Sphinxhaven, on Lake Nyasa, on May 30, 1915. Lieutenant-commander Dennistoun, who is a son of Mr G. J. Dennistoun, of Peel Forest, is very well known in Christchurch. He joined the navy about 17 years ago, and was promoted sub-lieutenant in 1903. In 1905 he was appointed to the Pyramus, and since then has served most of his time afloat in Australian and New Zealand waters. In 1909 he was appointed first and gunnery lieutenant in H.M.S. Pioneer, and he served in that ship until she was turned over to the Australian navy in March, 1913, when he transferred to the Pyramus. When that ship was recommissioned in July, 1914, Lieutenant-commander Dennistoun was temporarily attached to the Pyramus. He married a few weeks later a daughter of the late Mr F. H. Pyne. When the Main Expeditionary Force left New Zealand, Lieutenant-commander Dennistoun went in the Tahiti aa transport officer. From Alexandria he went on to England, and on reporting to the Admiralty, was at once ordered to Central Africa, where he took up the appointment of senior naval officer on Lake Nyasa.

Information has been received by Mr Henry Cotterill, of Christchurch (says the Press) that his son, Dennis [Lionel Denis] COTTERILL, who gained a Military Cross, has been given a staff appointment in England. The cross was bestowed upon Mr Cotterill for descending into a mine filled with poison gas to rescue some soldiers. One of the doctors went at the same time, and they were both dressed in diving apparatus. They managed to descend and return safely, but, unfortunately, the men below were all dead.

Mr Onslow Stanley PARKER, son of Mr W. J. Parker, of Remuera, and Mr William Owen SPINKS, son of Mr R. B. Spinks, of Ponsonby, are leaving Wellington for London to join the Royal Flying Corps.

Mr Jack Reginald GREY [GRAY], son of Captain W. J. Grey, of Wellington, who recently obtained his master's certificate as a yachtsman, will leave shortly for England to enter the naval service.

EVENING POST, VOLUME XCI, ISSUE 112, 12 MAY 1916
Mr. Joshua Tucker, of Ashburton, has received word from his son, Captain Frederick George TUCKER, who is on active service in German East Africa, to the effect that he is well. He is unable to give particulars of the fighting, but states that it is a great country, and they have had two big bayonet fights in the moonlight.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3244, 17 MAY 1916
Mr Joshua Tucker, of Ashburton, has received a letter from his son, Captain Frederick George TUCKER, who is on active service in German East Africa, stating that he is well. He is unable to give particulars of the fighting, but says it is a great country, and they have had two big bayonet fights in the moonlight.

It was recently reported by us that Dr William Marshall MACDONALD of this city, had been promoted to the rank of medecin-major first class, in the French Army Medical Service, and appointed physician to the neurological centre for the Fourth Army District of Le Mans. This centre has recently been remodelled and enlarged for the accommodation of 400 in-patients, as well as of a large out-patient department. The centre, at which all the cases of wound's and disease of the nervous system in the Fourth District are treated, is under ths control of Dr Tinel, the well-known neurologist of the Salpetriere Hospital, Paris, and the two assistant physicians have also served on the staff of Professor Dojerine ati the Salpetriere.

A soldier who has seen exciting service in a strange land is Captain S. C. Anderson, son of Mrs Francis John CHASE [Rebecca and Charles ANDERSON nee FINDLAYSON], of Roslyn, who recently returned to Dunedin from South Africa. Dunedin is Captain Anderson's birthplace, but for the past 14 or 15 years he has been engaged as a metallurgist with mining companies in South Africa. On two occasions he has taken advantage of the extended leave which such companies willingly give their employees to enable them to have their share in the suppression of native rebellions. These were Zulu risings that Captain Anderson took part in stamping out, and the experience he then gained proved useful when he volunteered for the recent campaign in German South West Africa. One of the great difficulties of that campaign, he says, was the scarcity of water. Sometimes the Hereros would lead the troops to a likely spot, but almost invariably the recognised water holes had been poisoned by the Germans with the liberal use of arsenical sheep dip. Horses with the British troops, after going for perhaps 60 hours without water, would actually drink themselves to death when they came to a waterhole. The natives were very friendly to the British and Dutch, realising that their presence would end the brutal outrages they had become accustomed to associate with the Germans. It was not uncommon to see the bodies of natives hanging from trees where they had been murdered by the Germans. The Huns' treatment of the natives was indeed becoming a menace to the whole of the white population of Africa, for the natives were liable to visit their resentment on whites of any nationality. Captain Anderson was incapacitated by enteric fever while taking part in the German South-West African expedition, and he has come back here largely for rest and holiday. It is his intention later on to return to South Africa and seek active service again.

Mr Frank HAYTER [aka Francis Goodenough HAYTER] (South Canterbury) spent ten months in France, with King Edward's Horse. Lately I was able to send out to New Zealand some of his experiences connected with the early landing; and now I have seen some further notes which he wrote to a friend. As these contain numerous fragments of interesting reading, I do not hesitate to make some extracts. He doesn't seem much to like some of the old French farmhouses, with their dilapidated barns, and with their living rooms, cowsheds, and stables all facing on to a yard containing the inevitable manure pit. But in spite of this horrible arrangement he found the inhabitants healthy and their living apartments very clean and neat...

I have been favoured with an interesting account of the adventurous journey of Dr Jessie SCOTT from Auckland to London by way of Salonika, Serbia, Belgrade, Vienna, and Zurich. Dr Scott has reached London safe and sound, none the worse for her wanderings right in the middle of the Balkan war zone. At present she is taking a well earned rest in this country, and her future movements are necessarily uncertain. Dr Scott took her degree at Edinburgh, and from 1910-1913 was on the medical staff of the London County Council. In the latter year she returned to Auckland, and practised in that city until last summer, when she received a cable from the Scottish Women's Hospitals Unit for Serbia asking her to join the staff and go straight to Salonika. There were three units, all under the charge of Dr Inglis, and they arrived shortly before the main enemy attack which ended in Serbia being overrun by a horde of Bulgarians, Germans, and Austrians. The Scottish units were broken up, some of the staff retreating through Albania with the Serbian army, while others (including Dr Scott) refused to leave the wounded Serbians, and were made prisoners of war...

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3245, 24 MAY 1916
Information has been received by cable of the death from wounds of Captain David Mitchell TOMLINSON, on May 13. Captain Tomlinson was a distinguished science graduate of Otago University, and was in London in connection with his profession when war was declared. He immediately enlisted in King Edward's Horse, afterwards transferring to the 13th Royal Scots as lieutenant. He was serving in that regiment at the time of his death.

Captain Philip Randel WOODHOUSE, R.A.M.C., of Dunedin, who has been in France since the outbreak of the war, was recently awarded the Military Cross. Captain Woodhouse has been slightly wounded, but is still with the 1st Battalion, Irish Guards, to which he has lately been attached as medical officer.

Private advice has been received that Lieutenant-colonel William James Theodore GLASGOW, of the Royal West Surrey Regiment, has been promoted to the rank of brigadier-general. He is an old boy of Nelson College, and was one of the first three New Zealanders to qualify for Sandhurst. Lieutenant-colonel Alfred Edgar GLASGOW is a younger brother of the brigadier-general.

News was received by the last mail of the serious illness of Captain Arthur Ernest MARSACK, R.A.M.C. Dr Marsack, who is stationed at the Fort Pitt Military Hospital, Chatham, Kent, was suffering from cerebro-spinal fever, but when the mail left was reported to be out of danger.

Advice has been received of the promotion to a captaincy of Lieutenant Frederick Arthur RUCK of Christchurch, who has been serving with the British forces in Flanders. [ex 1NZEF]

Advice has been received in Christchurch that Mr Frederick Denny FARROW, late of Grahamstown University, South Africa, who went to England in January last to offer his services to the Imperial Government, received orders in March to proceed to France, as assistant chemical adviser to the 4th Army, with the rank of lieutenant.

A private letter states that Mr Francis George Leopold (Frank) HOLLAND, formerly a teacher in the service of the Wanganui Education Board, and well-known in local cricket circles, and who is now a lieutenant in the Royal Field Artillery, is with his battery at Salonika.

HASTINGS STANDARD, VOLUME VI, ISSUE 141, 29 MAY 1916
Word has been received that another New Zealander, Mr Walter Smith PENTY, son of Mr. E. Pentv, of Ruakituri, Hawke's Bay, who left New Zealand some time ago for the purpose of learning aviation in America, has now gained his certificate and ranks as a professional aviator. From there he proceeded to Whitehall, London, and having been accepted by the authorities he is now awaiting instructions. He expects to be attached to the navy. Mr. Penty is a nephew of Mr. F. Penty, architect, of Wellington.
Mr. J. W. Reid, Napier, has received word from his son Lieutenant John Laurie REID, that he has quite recovered from his wound and is again medically fit. After leaving hospital Lieutenant Reid was granted three weeks sick leave, but only one week had elapsed when he was commanded to join the Seventh Wing Royal Flying Corps. It is just a year since Lieutenant Reid left New Zealand, and he has had training in various quarters. The first month at Home he was working in Woolwich Arsenal after which he joined the territorial regiment attached to and bearing the name of the King's Royal Rifles. Next he went in for and obtained a commission in the 18th Northumberland Fusiliers, Imperial Army, and it was while with this regiment serving in France that he was wounded. Lieutenant Reid mentions the fact that the sergeant major of his squadron is a Maori from Rotorua, and that another New Zealander, a Christchurch boy, is also in the seventh wing R.F.C.

NEW ZEALAND HERALD, VOLUME LIII, ISSUE 16242, 30 MAY 1916
OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3247, 7 JUNE 1916
The Victoria Cross has been awarded to Corporal Harry RICHARDSON, of the Gordon Highlanders, eldest son of Mrs Richardson (of Onehunga) and the late Mr Richardson, for many years town clerk of Onehunga. Corporal Richardson was born at Onehunga and is 40 years of age. He was educated at the Epsom Public School some years ago, went to Australia, and thence to South Africa, where he served in the war against the Boers. He remained in South Africa until the outbreak of the present war, when he enlisted in the Union Forces and served in the campaign in German South-west Africa He was wounded in the left hand, and later in the knee. While still under medical treatment, Richardson went to England, and on his recovery joined the Gordon Highlanders. If is believed that the decoration was awarded for gallantry in holding a redoubt with 35 men for four days. When relieved he was suffering severely from frost-bitten feet and was admitted to the trench hospital. In a letter recently received by his mother, Corporal Richardson says that when he returns to New Zealand he will bring five medals, all of which have been well earned. Three brothers have joined the forces. One (Robert) served in the South African campaign and is again on active service; while another (Charles) recently returned home, suffering from injuries caused by shrapnel. A younger brother (Alfred) is training with the Seventeenth Reinforcements. [Kiwi Battlefields by Dr Ron Palenski - However Victoria Cross records show no such award to anyone from the Gordon Highlanders called Richardson and certainly no New Zealander called Richardson. (The only Richardson recorded as a V.C winner was a Canadian piper.)]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3249, 21 JUNE 1916
Leslie Daniel FOLLETT [aka Leslie Raymond FOLLETT], eldest son of Mr C. Follett, of Marton, was one of the victims of the North Sea fight, the parents having received a cablegram to that effect on Saturday. About two years ago the deceased, who was only 21 years of age, was serving on a Norwegian boat, and when this vessel was held up by the Germans, young Follett was asked by the Germans his nationality. He replied, "Norwegian," and when the vessel arrived at a British port he joined the navy. He was transferred to the Queen Mary, and was first stoker when she went down.

Captain Donald SIMSON, who reported for duty at Trentham Camp recently and was declared by the Medical Board unfit for active service, has been granted his release from the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. Captain Simson belongs to the Special Reserve of English Cavalry Officers, and from the King Edward's Horse was transferred to the British Section of New Zealanders. It is his intention to remain in New Zealand until he has placed the New Zealand Returned Soldiers' Association on a sound basis.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XLI, ISSUE 9384, 24 JUNE 1916
Mr Rudolph Friedlander, of Ashburton, received news by last mail that his son, Sergeant-Major Otto Albert FRIEDLANDER, who had been with the Field Engineers since the landing at Gallipoli, and after the evacuation went to Egypt and subsequently to France, has received his commission, as lieutenant in the Royal Engineers, and is at present at Chatham. Mr Friedlander's other son, Captain Hugo Rudolph FRIEDLANDER R.A.M.C., has been promoted to a casualty clearing station in France.

WAIRARAPA DAILY TIMES, VOLUME LXX, ISSUE 14598, 26 JUNE 1916
Judge Cooper received advice on Saturday that his son [Herbert Ambrose COOPER], who was a captain in a Flying Corps, had been killed.
Lieutenant Gladstone William WARD, son of Sir Joseph WARD, has received his full commission in the transport section of the Imperial Army Service Corps.

NEW ZEALAND HERALD, VOLUME LIII, ISSUE 16266, 27 JUNE 1916
Captain William Henderson GIBB [HENDERSON GIBB], late of the 16th Waikato Regiment, N.Z. Infantry, is now out in India.
Temporary Commander Bernard C. FREYBERG, D.S.O., has been transferred from the R.N.V.R. to the Royal West Surrey Regiment, with the rank of captain.
Mr Hugh Arthur MOUTRAY READ, of Auckland, who had a commission in King Edward's Horse at the beginning of 1915 and transferred rather more than a year ago to the Army Service Corps, is now gazetted Inspector of Fire Services (graded for pay as a staff captain) with the temporary rank of captain.
Mr William Edward BARNARD, solicitor, of Te Aroha, spent six weeks touring in England on arrival about Christmas, and in February he enlisted as a private in the R.A.M.C. He is now at Aldershot and says he has never regretted joining the ranks. [see 1NZEF 83456]
Temporary Captain Robert Haldane MAKGILL M.D., of Auckland, relinquished his commission on May 6. It will be remembered that he came Home on special leave for war service about a year ago, and that latterly he had been Chief Sanitary Officer, Alexandria District. Dr. Makgill is to leave for New Zealand at an early date.
Mr Reginald Cheyne BERKELEY, formerly of Auckland, but more recently of Suva, expects to leave for the front shortly. [Captain Rifle Brigade M.C]
Second-Lieutenant John Inglis CHRYSTALL, of Christchurch, is seconded for service with a brigade machine-gun company.
Second Lieutenant John (Jack) SEABROOK, R.F.C., of Auckland, began his training at the Curragh, in March last. Since then he has been posted to Farnborough to take courses of instruction prior to being instructed in aviation. Mr. Otto Albert FRIEDLANDER is gazetted to a commission in the Royal Engineers. Enlisting as a private in the N.Z. Expeditionary Force, Sergeant Major Friedlander was recommended by General Sir A. J. Godley for a commission in the Imperial Army.
Promotion for two New Zealanders in the North Irish Horse is just gazetted - Second-Lieutenants Gilbert Hutton GRIGG and John Hutton GRIGG are now full lieutenants.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3250, 28 JUNE 1916
Captain Eustace STOCKER, who as stated in a recent cable message, has been mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig's despatches is a son of Mr B Stocker, of the legislative Council staff. When the war broke out he was in England, having been granted a year's leave of absence from Supreme Court duties in Wellington. He enlisted with the British section of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, and in due course was sent to Egypt, where he was under Colonel Esson. While there he was recalled to London and given the rank of captain in the King's Liverpool Regiment. He went through the battle of Loos, in which he distinguished himself, and is still on the western front. When he last wrote to his parents he was on the British Headquarters Staff.

Mr Justice Cooper received, advice this afternoon that his son, Herbert Ambrose COOPER, a captain in the Flying Corps, had been killed.

Mr J. L. Clemas, of Wairoa, has received a cablegram from the Admiralty notifying that his only son William Leonard CLEMAS was lost in the battle of Jutland. Deceased was transferred from the Hornet to the Nestor quite recently.

Lieutenant Lionel Denis COTTERILL, 5th Royal Berkshires, son of Mr H. Cotterill, of Christchurch, has been gazetted captain, dating from October 14 last. He got his captaincy 10 days after he had reached the age of 21 years.

Lieutenant Frank Irwin RUTHERFURD, of Wellington, has been awarded the Military Cross. He went to England over 12 months ago, obtained a commission in the Royal Field Artillery, and was sent to France soon after. He is at present in London, recovering from wounds.

Relatives in Nelson received word by last mail that Lieutenant-colonel Alfred Edgar GLASGOW (Royal Sussex Regiment) has been twice wounded, and when the mail left was in England. Lieutenant-colonel Glasgow is a brother of Messrs A. and J. Glasgow, of Nelson. Another brother has recently been promoted to be a brigadier-general.

Captain Leopold Mielziner (Leo) MYERS, formerly a well known citizen of Auckland, and a brother of the Hon. Arthur Myers, left England for the front some six weeks ago as captain in command of a company of 250 men in the 60th Regiment (King's Royal Rifles). It will be remembered that Captain Myers enlisted as a private 16 months ago in the 2nd Sportsmen's Battalion (now the 24th Royal Fusiliers), and has worked hard to achieve his present rank.

NEW ZEALAND HERALD, VOLUME LIII, ISSUE 16267, 28 JUNE 1916
Advice was received by Mr. George Gould, the well-known Christchurch citizen, to-day, of the death of his second son, Second-Lieutenant George Oscar Alan GOULD, King's Royal Rifles, who died of wounds in France. Lieutenant Gould, who was 21 years of age, was educated at Christ College and Harrow, and when war broke out he was studying for the law. He acted for a time as temporary aide-de-camp to the Governor, Lord Liverpool, and then went Home and obtained a commission.

PRESS, VOLUME LII, ISSUE 15629, 29 JUNE 1916
Second Lieutenant John Inglis CHRYSTALL, 13th Hussars (Christchurch), is seconded for service with a Brigade Machine-gun company.
Lieutenant Peter CLARKE (Wiltshire Regiment) of Temuka, is now on administrative work in connexion with his divisional trench mortars, which he regards as one of the most fascinating arms of the service. He has been engaged in a section of the line on which our tunnelling company have made themselves a name for intrepidity and daring. When Lieutenant Clarke went to administrative work his place in the battery was taken, by Lieutenant Stuart SEDDON (Wellington). Lieutenant Clarke is spending a few days furlough, as usual, in visiting Ireland.
Mr Reginald Ngatiawa Ramsbottom ISHERWOOD (Christchurch), who has a commission in the Royal Horse Artillery, is at present taking a course at the Larkhill School of Gunnery. While spending Easter at Sandringham, as a guest of Mrs F. Beck, Mr Isherwood had the honour of being presented to Princess Victoria, who showed a keen interest in the Dominion and great admiration for the gallantry of the colonial forces.
Temporary Second-Lieutenant Lester Edward Lucas DONNE (Unattached List) is to have the temporary rank of lieutenant, while employed as a recruiting officer. He is the second son of Captain T. E. Donne.
At the conclusion of a year's service in the R.A.M.C., Lieutenant Fife SLATER (Kaikoura) relinquishes his commission.
Mrs ANDREWS, wife of Major C. E. Andrews, New Zealand Staff Corps (Timaru), is on the nursing staff of the 4th London General Hospital.
Mr. Stuart Maxwell DEANS (Christchurch) is studying at the Royal Military College, Camberley.
Major Lawrence George David HUTCHISON, Royal Engineers, was recently granted short leave from the front. He came over and met his father, Mr George Hutchison, who is here on Privy Council business.

OTAGO DAILY TIMES, ISSUE 16736, 3 JULY 1916
New Zealanders officially gazetted to the Royal Flying Corps have during the last few days included William Stanley SHIRTCLIFFE (Wellington), George Edmond Vernon AIMER (Auckland), and James Duff HEWETT. They have commissions as second lieutenants.
Lieutenant William James CLACHAN, Middlesex Regiment (Wellington), has been promoted to the rank of captain, to date from the end of March.

DOMINION, VOLUME 9, ISSUE 2814, 4 JULY 1916
The Rev. W. Ford-Hutchinson has received private advice by cablegram that his son, Trooper Frederick George FORD-HUTCHINSON, who left with the Main Body New Zealand Expeditionary Forces, and was wounded at Gallipoli, has received a commission in the A.S.C.M.T. Imperial Army.
Advice has been received that Lance Corporal James Francis Bayntun CONDON was killed in action in France on June 21 [actually 06 June 1916]. A son of the late Mr. James Condon, Lance Corporal Condon was born in Auckland, and completed his education at St. Patrick's College, Wellington. He was in the service of Messrs. Devore, Martin, and Prendergast for about two years, and afterwards acted as assistant secretary for the North Auckland Farmers' Co-op. Limited, in Whangarei. In January, 1911, he went to Canada, and was employed on the engineering staff of the Canadian-Pacific Railway at Calgary. Immediately after the outbreak of war he enlisted, and had been in France 18 months. Lance-Corporal Condon, who was 29 years of age was a nephew of the Hon. W. Beehan, M.L.C.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3251, 5 JULY 1916
Letters have been received by relatives of the late Major David Mitchell TOMLINSON from the chaplain of the 13th Royal Scots and from Lieutenant Dunlop, of the same regiment, giving particulars of Major Tomlinson's death, and from these we extract the following: — Chaplain Courts writes: "Our commanding officer being killed, Major Tomlinson had taken over, and was leading our men with the utmost gallantry and coolness when he fell. He was taken to the Thirty-third Casualty Clearing Station, where he had the advantage of the most skilled surgical attendance available out here, but in vain, and he succumbed on Sunday. I was near the front, and could not be present myself, but I understand he is buried near a well known French town in a quiet spot, which will be quite easily identified after the war should that be your wish. It is hard to convey to you a sense of the loss the battalion has sustained in one whose rapid rise had marked him out on many occasions he as a born soldier; but our loss is insignificant in comparison with yours, and I ask you to accept the sincere sympathy of the whole battalion." Lieutenant Dunlop writes saying that no one was more highly thought of in the regiment than Major Tomlinson, and that "he was without doubt the finest officer we had. The men thought the whole world of him, and would follow him anywhere. The loss to the regiment in his death is beyond measure, and I feel it more than I can say,"
Word has been received in Wellington that Commander Bernard Cecil FREYBERG, D.S.O., of the Royal Naval Division, has been wounded again, this time in the right arm. The message states that the arm is fractured. Commander Freyberg has been wounded several times previously.
Dr Stephen Galt TRAIL [TRAILL] (Fairlie), who was appointed to a lieutenancy in the R.A.M.C. in June 1915 has just relinquished his commission. He returned from France early this year, suffering from shrapnel wounds in the leg and injury sustained from a crushing by his horse, which was killed at the same time. Even if unfit for foreign service, Dr Trail hopes to continue in some form of army work until the end of the war.
A fresh list of awards and promotions was issued yesterday for services in connection with the war. Major (temporary lieutenant colonel) W. R. PINWILL, Liverpool Regiment, is to be Brevet Lieutenant-colonel. It will be remembered that he was on the staff in New Zealand from 1911 to 1914.
Major Norman Chivas HAMILTON, Army Service Corps (Lieutenant-colonel New Zealand Imperial Force) has been awarded the D.S.O., as also has Captain George Frederick HUTTON, Royal Welsh Fusiliers (son-in-law of Mr and Mrs A. E. G. Rhodes, of Christchurch). Major Hamilton was appointed for service under the New Zealand Government toward the end of 1913.
Dr Agnes BENNETT (Wellington) has come to England for a rest after a year's work in Egypt. She spent a short time in Paris, where she found the pressure of the war - especially the economic pressure - sadly felt; much more so than in London. Unless there is great demand for medical officers within the next three months, Dr Bennett will return to New Zealand.
At a special meeting of the French Society of Neurology, held in Paris, to consider the neurology of war, Great Britain was represented by Dr William Marshall MACDONALD of Dunedin, who is at present working at Le Mans, and by the celebrated English neurologist, Dr Gordon Holmes. Amongst the questions which were considered from the medico-military standpoint were head injuries, wounds of nerves, and hysteria of war. It is scarcely necessary to say that the experience of the last 20 months has furnished immense new material for these studies.
Major William Allen CHAPPLE, R.A.M.C, has been transferred to the Kitchener Hospital in Brighton, from Mount Vernon, Hampstead. At the moment he is in France as a parliamentary delegate to the Allied Commercial Congress being held in Paris. He is hoping to get near to the trenches, and to see over some of the war hospitals of France, so as to obtain an idea of the surgical work from the beginning. Miss Louisa Douglas (Isa) CHAPPLE is on the nursing staff of the 2nd Eastern Hospital at Brighton; Miss Nelca CHAPPLE is nursing at the Morden Grange Hospital, and Miss Elizabeth Ewing (Ella) CHAPPLE is similarly engaged at the Morden Hall Hospital, near Wimbledon.
Sub-lieutenant William Edward SANDERS, R.N.R., is at present undergoing his gunnery course at Portsmouth on H.M.S. Excellent. Before leaving New Zealand he served in the troopships of the U.S.S. Company for 11 months, resigning to serve in the R.N.R. Mr Sanders belongs to Auckland.
Mr Ernest MASCALL (Auckland) was not able to get into either the Royal Flying Corps or the Royal Naval Air Service, but he has joined up with the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Motor Patrol Boat Section, and has been given the position of chief engineer. He is under orders to leave for Southampton for about two months instruction in gunnery, signalling, etc., before entering on active service.
Sisters Sybil Kathleen KELLY and Ethel Mary STRACHAN, who have been working for some time at the New Zealand Hospital at Walton, have recently resigned from the staff there and have now left for Russia to do Red Cross nursing. Their first destination is Petrograd.
Temporary Second-lieutenant George Geoffrey SALE, a son of Professor Sale, who came from South Africa to offer his services, was posted last July to the North Staffordshire Regiment. He has now been transferred to the Royal Engineers. Mr Sale was a graduate of the Otago School of Mines and has been a mining engineer in South Africa for some years.
Mr Henry Isaac COHEN, son of Mr Albert Cohen, of the Evening Star, Dunedin, has reached England, and has been informed by the War Office that he will receive a commission in an infantry regiment at an early date. Mr Cohen came overland from Marseilles, spending a few days in Paris. [see Archway file]
Dr Gilbert Henry DIVE, who holds a captain's commission in the R.A.M.C, is to be temporary Major while in command of a Field Ambulance.
Captain and Adjutant Francis Alexander (Frank) WILSON (Napier), Royal Dublin Fusiliers, was, at the outbreak of war, one of the masters at Mount Cook School, Wellington. He joined the Wellington Battalion and went to Egypt, being subsequently recommended for a commission. This in due course he obtained, and his present rank is of recent date.
Temporary Lieutenant William Reginald BIRCH (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is now gazetted captain, his promotion dating from December last.
Mr Raymond George GOLDFINCH (Feilding) is an air mechanic in the Royal Naval Air Service. He arrived from New Zealand in April.
Mr Nicholas GREENWELL (Auckland) late of the Public Works Department at Taumarunui, and his brother (Mr Arthur Robert GREENWELL), have commissions in the air services, the former in the Royal Flying Corps and the latter in the Royal Naval Air Service. They arrived at the beginning of February, and until a week ago Mr N. Greenwell filled up the interval awaiting his acceptance by working at a munition factory in London, where the chief occupation is sighting for anti-aircraft guns. Now he has gone to Oxford for his "wings." Flight Sublieutenant A. Greenwell is in London.
Mr James Duff HEWETT is now a Flight Sub-lieutenant in the Royal Naval Air Service.
Lieutenant Leslie Norman REECE, R.A.M.C. (Christchurch) has been promoted Captain. He is at the London General Hospital. After recovering from illness last year Dr Reece was recommended to take home duty during last winter.
Second-lieutenant Clive Franklyn COLLETT, Royal Flying Corps (Wellington) has been promoted to full lieutenant.
Second-lieutenant Peter CLARKE, Wiltshire Regiment, who is with a trench mortar battery, has been transferred from a reserve to a regular battalion.
Mr E. G. HONEY [?], a young New Zealand journalist, joined the 20th Battalion Middlesex Regiment as a private at the beginning of 1915. He has recently been discharged from the army after attacks of pneumonia.
Mr Fred Arthur EUSTACE (Auckland) who obtained his commission in the Royal West Kent Regiment at the end of 1914, is now a full lieutenant. He was in London when war broke out, and once joined the New Zealanders at Bulford, but was early recommended for a commission.
Second-lieutenant (temporary Captain) Lawrence George David HUTCHISON, Liverpool Regiment, T.F., is to be a temporary major while commanding a Tunnelling Company.
A young New Zealander on submarine duty here is Mr John William KINDER, son of Mr H. Kinder, of Auckland. After completing his studies at Wanganui College he went into Fraser's foundry and served his time there. Later he went to Sydney and passed as chief engineer. A desire to obtain some knowledge of oil engines brought him to England, and he was sailing between England and the Argentine on a vessel called the Highland Pride when war was declared. Immediately he offered his services, and after a short time ashore was attached to a first-class cruiser (the Penelope). On board this vessel he put in a winter in the North Sea, and then volunteered for submarine duty. Mr Kinder was on E 6 up to the trip before she was lost, with all hands, now he is ashore standing by a new submarine.
Major Herbert Hely POUNDS (Auckland) is serving with the Durham Light Infantry, and is at present recovering from a wound received in Flanders.
Lieutenant Arthur HIRST, R.N.V.R. (Taranaki), has returned to duty after being invalided from the North Sea. He is now on patrol duty in the Downs.

EVENING POST, VOLUME XCII, ISSUE 7, 8 JULY 1916
The following casualties to members of the Imperial Army having next-of-kin in New Zealand were reported at noon today:
Killed in Action. 30th June, FITZHERBERT, Harold Lancelot, 2nd Lieut. (Fenton Latham, College-street, Wanganui)
Wounded. 30th June. Admitted Hospital in England, FITZHERBERT, Wyndham Waterhouse, Lieut. (Fenton Latham, College-street, Wanganui)
In Hospital, Wounded, FREYBERG, Bernard, Lieutenant Colonel (C. Freyberg, Tourist Department, Wellington); arm fracture

WAIRARAPA AGE, VOLUME XXXVIII, ISSUE 11752, 10 JULY 1916
News has been received that Second Lieutenant Harold Lancelot FITZHERBERT was killed in action on June 30th, and that his brother, Lieutenant Wyndham Waterhouse FITZHERBERT, was wounded on the same day. Both officers, who are members of the Imperial Army, belonged to Wanganui, and are brothers of Mrs E. P. Fenton, of Masterton.

OTAGO DAILY TIMES, ISSUE 16742, 10 JULY 1916
At the last investiture at Buckingham Palace, Captain Charles NELSON, 15th Hussars, received the Distinguished Service Order. From 1907-09 Captain Nelson served on the New Zealand Staff.
New Zealanders are glad to notice that the Military Cross has been awarded Second Lieutenant Alfred de Bathe BRANDON, Royal Flying Corps (Special Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and skill in dropping bombs on a Zeppelin at night. This feat, it will be remembered, was accomplished on the night of March 31, when Zeppelin L13 sunk in the Thames Estuary.
Second Lieutenant John Inglis CHRYSTALL, 13th Hussars (Christchurch), is seconded for service with a brigade machine gun company.
Captain Guy FETHERSTON, Royal Field Artillery, has been spending a short furlough from the front, where he has been for about 12 months.
Mr Rewi Rawhiti MACINTOSH (Oamaru) is hoping to go to Perth almost at once and start training with the Black Watch. Having held a commission in New Zealand, he is hoping to obtain one in this favourite Scottish regiment. Leaving New Zealand toward the end of January, Mr Macintosh stayed in the Argentine for seven weeks with relatives.
Mr George Foden Rooking HALL (Napier) went out to the Dardanelles last September with the West Kent Yeomanry, and was at Cape Helles. After a while he had to go into hospital, suffering from enteric, and he returned to England in January by the hospital ship Mauretania. He is now on furlough, after treatment at Birmingham. On the way to the Dardanelles the troopship Olympic, with about 7000 men on board, was nearly torpedoed in the Mediterranean, the torpedo passing within a few feet of the stern. The guns on board fired, but the submarine disappeared.
Captain W. E. Faulkner, Leicester Regiment has relinquished his commission on account of ill-health.
Private Daniel O'HARA, N.Z. Infantry (formerly of the Union Steam Ship Company of New Zealand), has received a commission in the Royal Naval Reserve. He was at the Dardanelles for eight month.
Lieutenant James NELSON, Royal Engineer, is stationed at Sevenoaks. He belongs to Otago.
A New Zealander who joined the South African Rifles and is at present in France is Mr Maurice JACOBSON (only son of Mr and Mrs J. Jacobson, late of Wellington). He went to British East Africa three years ago as chief engineer at the Nairobi sawmills, and joined the S.A. Rifles at the beginning of the war.
Captain William HENDERSON GIBB (late of the 16th Waikato Regiment, N.Z. Infantry), 3rd Battalion, the Black Watch, is now out in India, attached to tho 1st Garrison Battalion, Scottish Rifles.
Miss Agnes Boyd ALLAN (late of the Waipu Hospital) who has been nursing in a military hospital in York for some time, is about to be transferred for service in India. Her sister, Miss Jean Mackie ALLAN, who has been nursing at Malta and Gibraltar for some time, will presently arrive in England.
The death is recorded from wounds of Major David Mitchell TOMLINSON, Royal Scots. In April 1915, he obtained a commission in the 13th (Service) Battalion, up to which time he had been a corporal in King Edward's Horse. In the early part of last year he was promoted first lieutenant, and in April of this year he had two more steps in advance.
Second Lieutenants Victor James GALLIE (Wellington) and Joseph Ward RUTLEDGE (Christchurch) have been confirmed in their rank in the Royal Field Artillery.
On the declaration of war Mr John Lauderdale STEWART-RICHARDSON was living in Hawke's Bay, and he at once enlisted in the New Zealand Mounted Rifles, and served in Gallipoli. In May 1915, he was wounded and invalided to England. In the same month he married Miss N Joyce RIGBY, and in the following October he obtained a commission in the Coldstream Guards. Today comes the news that he was killed on May 17. He was the second son of the late Sir James Stewart-Richardson, Bart., of Penentland, and brother of Captain Sir A. E. Stewart-Richardson, Bart., of the Black Watch who died of wounds in November 1914. His age was 38.
Second Lieutenant Lawrence ALLMAN-MARCHANT (Wellington) who has a commission in the Royal Irish Fusiliers, has been confirmed in his appointment.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3252, 12 JULY 1916
The Hon. C. J. Johnston, Speaker of the Legislative Council, has received a cablegram, intimating that his son, Captain Octavius Ralph Featherston/e JOHNSTON, was killed in action on July 2. He was serving with the Middlesex Regiment.
Word was received in Dunedin from the War Office on the 6th that Captain James Lloyd FINDLAY, of the 7th East Surreys, second son of Sir John Findlay, has been severely wounded, and is now lying in hospital at Boulogne. Captain Findlay, who has been on active service since the outbreak of the war, had escaped injury up to the present. His elder brother is also on active service, and it will be remembered that his younger brother lost his life some time ago.
Twice within the last week the cablegrams have mentioned the dashing work of the Highland Light Infantry. It is interesting to note that the ex-Otago High School boy, Captain Cecil Frederick George HUMPHRIES, is attached to the 12th Highland Light Infantry. He was in London when war broke out, and joined the Army Service Corps with the rank of sergeant; quickly resigned this rank, and joined the Manchester's, Indian Expeditionary Force, as a private; won the D.C.M. and was promoted to sergeant; was wounded at Neuve Chapelle. Invalided to England, Sergeant Humphries soon recovered, and was promoted to lieutenant, and later on to captain.
Information has been received that Sergeant Charles Arthur WHEELER, a native of Dunedin, but latterly an artist resident in Melbourne, who went to the front about 18 months ago has been awarded the D.C.M. He is still at the front, and is attached to the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment).[British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920 Name: Charles A Wheeler Regiment or Corps: Royal Fusiliers Regimental Number: K/1226, TP/7375 [TR/73751]]

POVERTY BAY HERALD, VOLUME XLIII, ISSUE 14042, 12 JULY 1916
According to advice that has recently been received from the front, one of five New Zealanders recommended by General Godley for commissions in the Imperial Army included Lieutenant Harry Elsmore HOWARD, formerly of the Public Works Department's staff at Ngatapa. Lieutenant Howard, who was employed as a chainman on the railway works was an Imperial reservist, having been a private in the Grenadier Guards. He left Gisborne with one of the very first drafts and at Palmerston North was offered a commission in the New Zealand Forces. He preferred, however, to accompany the New Zealanders in the ranks, and had the distinction of passing through the entire Gallipoli campaign from the first landing till the day of evacuation without a day's illness or receiving even a scratch. He received his first leave after over 18 months continuous active service, when the evacuation was completed, and was granted time to spend a week with his people in England. Lieutenant Howard was warmly commended by General Godley for his continuous services, and his friends here will doubtless be glad to hear of his success.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3253, 19 JULY 1916
Cable news Dunedin on the 12th that Lieutenant Philip Lowrey WRIGHT, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, had been wounded in France, and is now in England. The wound was a shrapnel one in the head, but is reported to be not serious. Lieutenant Wright is a son of the late Mr J. T. Wright, of Messrs Wright, Stephenson, and Co., Dunedin.
Private cable messages have been received from Lieutenant Thomas Edward Youd SEDDON, M.P., Land Brigade Canterbury Battalion, and Lieutenant John Stuart Spotswood SEDDON, R.F.A., that they are both well. The cables have come since the German attack on the New Zealand trenches, and the great offensive. The brothers met in France. Lieutenant Stuart Seddon had just served three months in the deadly trench mortar work in the front trenches, and had come through safely. Word has also been received from Mrs Wood (nee Rubi Jessie SEDDON) that her husband, Fleet-surgeon Samuel Henry WOODS, who is well known to many New Zealanders, was transferred to H.M.S. New Zealand, as fleet surgeon, and served in her in the Jutland battle.
A message was received on Friday by Mr Howard J. S. Ellis, head master of the New Lynn Public School, stating that his son, Lieutenant Samuel Howard ELLIS, Royal Flying Corps, was reported by the War Office as missing on July 3. A further message received on Saturday stated that Lieutenant Ellis was now a prisoner in Germany. Owing to engine troubles he was forced to descend behind the enemy's lines. An officer in an accompanying aeroplane reported that he made an excellent landing.
Mr Edward Percy Verity SEALY, late of the National Bank, Timaru, has joined the French Ambulance, as he found no vacancy in the British Flying Corps or in the motor transport service. He ranks as an officer, but gets no pay. In a recent letter he states that he has been employed mostly in night work, going right up to the trenches, at one place only 200 yards from the front line. Shells are numerous, but in April the ambulance had only one man hit. A part of the road travelled by the ambulance passes in full view of the Germans, but there seems to be an understanding not to shell that part, and the French leave a part of a German road similarly free. In the convoy with which Mr Sealy is there are 14 Englishmen, three New Zealanders, a Ceylon tea planter, an Argentine rancher, a Greek, a Belgian, a Penang Britisher, a Singapore Britisher, and two French officers.
Lieutenant Harold Lancelot FITZHERBERT, of the Sussex Regiment, who has been killed in France, was a son of the late Mr Henry S Fitzherbert, who formerly practised as a solicitor in Wellington, and was later a magistrate at New Plymouth. [CWGC has Son of William Alfred and Fanny Fitzherbert which is correct.]

AUCKLAND STAR, VOLUME XLVII, ISSUE 175, 24 JULY 1916
Captain H. C. MEIKLE (Auckland), of the 4th Battalion, N.Z. Rifle Brigade, has been in London on short leave from France, while his Brigade had a week's rest. There is a possibility of his being admitted to one or other branches of the Air Service.
Miss B. C. BUTTON, of Auckland, who has been doing Red Cross work for some time, is now undergoing a course of training at the Agricultural College, Cambridge, with a view to going on the land during the summer months. In the autumn she intends visiting Scotland and Ireland, returning to London for the winter. If she does not return to New Zealand at the end of the year Miss Button will take up Red Cross work until the spring.
Miss A. TOMBE (Dunedin) was decorated last week by King George, who conferred on her the Royal Red Cross decoration of the first class, in recognition of her services in the organisation of the New Zealand Military Hospital at Walton-on-Thames. Miss Tombe was in this country for a holiday when war broke out, but immediately offered her services to the New Zealand Government. Miss Tombe has now gone to Ayr on a visit.
The following New Zealand ladies are doing Red Cross work at the New Zealand Hospital at Brockenhurst: - Mrs. Kenneth GORDON, of Auckland; Mrs. F. T. BOWERBANK, of Wellington; Mrs. George H. STEWART, of Crookston, Otago; and Miss Agnes M. HERBERT, of Kelso, Otago.
The two sons of Mrs James Troup, formerly of Christchurch, and now of Melbourne, are both in the Imperial Army. Lieutenant F. M. TROUP is in the 2nd Royal Fusiliers, and Second-Lieutenant J. D. TROUP is in the Royal Flying Corps. Engineer Sub-Lieutenant A. L. DAVIDSON, R.N.R. who died on June 6 from disease contracted in the Cameroon campaign, was the son of the late Mr. W. Davidson, of Willow Back, Barford, near Lismore, Canterbury, and had lately been with the New Zealand Shipping Company, Leadenhall Street, E.C. He obtained his commission in April, 1915.
Second-Lieutenant J. W. GORRIE, son of Mr. H. T. Gorrie of Auckland (N.Z.) is now in France with the 7th Worcester Regiment.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3254, 26 JULY 1916
Lieutenant George Hocken MASSEY, of the Royal Field Artillery, whose death in action is reported in our cables, was a son of Mr H. A. Massey, late of Invercargill, who is at present in London. Lieutenant Massey was educated at the Waitaki Boys' High School, and was later coached locally preparatory to entering a military college in England, at which he obtained a lieutenant's commission in the Field Artillery. [CWGC - Son of Horatio Arthur and Mary Judith Massey. Born in New Zealand. His improvements in horse stands were adopted by the Royal Artillery. His brother John Hamon Massey M.C also fell.]
Captain Charles Campbell MAY, who has been killed, was the only son of Mr Charles May, of Dunedin, who was in the May-Oatway firm. Mr May was formerly in the telegraph service here, and was in the Engineer Corps under Major Beal. He is now with the Army Service Corps in Egypt. His son, Captain May, went to London and joined the King's Colonials, and then received a commission in the Manchester Regiment. He was about 28 years of ago. He married in England, and one child is left with the mother.
The Southland Times states that the Rev. James Baird has received a very interesting letter from his son. Captain John Bruce BAIRD R.A.M.C., lately in practice at Kaitangata, describing his visit to Buckingham Palace on May 10. when he received the Distinguished Conduct Medal from his Majesty the King. According to the Gazette notice it was awarded for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty from September 25 to 27, 1915, when in charge of different bearer sections collecting wounded in the area between Lone Tree and Hulluch road under shell and machine gun fire. Captain Baird was a lieutenant at the time, and won not only the D.C.M., but also promotion to the rank of captain. Captain Baird is at present in charge of an ambulance train conveying wounded from the Flanders front.
A letter was received on Thursday from Surgeon-captain Rae McRAE (son of Mr J. McRae) an old Timaru boy, who is engaged in a casualty clearing station behind the firing line "somewhere in France." Great activity in the C.C.S. was going on as orders had been received to get ready at once to accommodate 1000 patients. This letter was written early in June.
The following members of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force are the nominees for commissions in the Imperial Forces for May, 1916: 4/509 Sergeant Philip Roderick McCrae HANNA [Royal Field Artillery], 2/647 Gunner John Menzies William MCKENZIE [Field Artillery but back to NZEF], 11/234 Corporal Ninian Steele HYSLOP [Royal Flying Corps], 7/424 Lance Sergeant Geoffrey Gordon RICH [Cavalry Reserve], Trooper Frederick George FORD-HUTCHINSON, Wellington Mounted Rifle Regiment [Royal Army Service Corps].

OTAGO DAILY TIMES, ISSUE 16758, 28 JULY 1916
News has been received that Lieutenant Colonel Redmond Barry NEILL, commanding the 15th West Yorks, has been wounded in action recently in France, and that he has been mentioned in despatches by General Sir Douglas Haig. Lieutenant Colonel Neill, who is a son of Mr P. C. Neill, of Dunedin, joined the Imperial Army in 1899, served through the South African war, and subsequently for 12 years in India. He retired from the army as captain in 1913 to take up sheep-farming in Canterbury. At the outbreak of the war he immediately offered his services to the War Office, and at a few hours notice left his sheep station at Mount Somers to accompany the New Zealand force to Samoa as adjutant. He returned from Samoa to train and take command of the Fourth Reinforcements, leaving New Zealand with them. On arriving in Egypt he left the New Zealand Expeditionary Force to rejoin his old regiment, tho Royal Irish Fusiliers, with which well-known and gallant corps he has seen a good deal of fighting at the front. From latest accounts Colonel Neill is progressing favourably at the Welbeck Street Hospital for officers in London.

TIMARU HERALD, VOLUME CV, ISSUE 16028, 31 JULY 1916
Mr Laurenson, of Pleasant Point, has received word that his son, Sergeant Daniel Gordon LAURENSON, who left here with the Main Body, and went through the Gallipoli campaign, has been given a commission in the Imperial Army.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3255, 2 AUGUST 1916
Lieutenant Noel Stewart WHITTON [Noel Stuart WHITTON], R.A.M.C., son of Dr Whitton of Oamaru, who was mentioned in Sir John French's despatches for gallantry in action at the Loos engagement, has now been gazetted a recipient of the Military Cross. Lieutenant Whitton is at present stationed at Basra with the Mesopotamia Expeditionary Force. Two of Lieutenant Whitton's contemporaries at Waitaki High School viz., Lieutenant Frederick Neville HOUSTON (York and Lancashire Regiment) and Lieutenant Watson Douglas SHENNAN (Royal Engineers) have been awarded the same high military distinction.
The Rev. W. S. Lucas, of Nelson, formerly of Waikouaiti has been advised by cablegram that his son, [Stanley Arthur LUCAS] who is a captain in the R.A.M.C., on the western front, is in a London hospital with a bullet wound in the foot, and is progressing favourably.
Captain George Alastair Sinclair THOMSON (killed) was the third son of Mr John Sinclair Thomson [SINCLAIR THOMSON], who previously lost another son (Captain Kenneth Sinclair Thomson) early in the Mesopotamia campaign while serving with an Indian cavalry regiment. Captain Thomson was born in Dunedin and educated at Christ's College, Christchurch, and at Loretto (Scotland). Returning to New Zealand, he studied at Lincoln College for about a year, and was then engaged on Colonel Cowie Nichols's station in North Otago, where he had spent about three years prior to going Home. He went Home in the early months of the war at very short notice, in response to a cablegram from an uncle, who offered to help him to secure a commission, and was given a commission in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. During the past year he saw a great deal of fighting. A third brother is serving on a torpedo boat in the North Sea.
Nurse Alice SMART, formerly of the Auckland Hospital, and of "Woodside" and other private hospitals, has been awarded the Royal Red Cross for her work since the war started. Nurse Smart offered her services soon after the war broke out, and was appointed to Reading Military Hospital where she has been stationed ever since.
News has been received that Lieutenant colonel Redmond Barry NEILL, commanding the 15th Yorks, has been wounded in action recently in France, and that he has been mentioned in despatches by General Sir Douglas Haig. Lieutenant-colonel Neill, who is a son of Mr P. C. Neill, of Dunedin, joined the Imperial Army in 1899, served through the South African war, and subsequently for 12 years in India, he retired from the army as captain in 1913 to take up sheep-farming in Canterbury. At the outbreak of the war he immediately offered his services to the War Office, and at a few hours notice left his sheep station at Mount Somers to accompany the New Zealand force to Samoa as adjutant. He returned from Samoa to train and take command of the Fourth Reinforcements, leaving New Zealand with them. On arriving in Egypt he left the New Zealand Expeditionary Force to rejoin his old regiment, the Royal Irish Fusiliers, with which well-known and gallant corps he has seen a good deal of fighting at the front. From latest accounts Colonel Neill is progressing favourably at the Welbeck Street Hospital for officers in London.
DEATHS - RITCHIE - Previously reported missing, now believed to have been killed in action on April 22, 1916, Lieutenant John Nevill RITCHIE (Seaforth Highlanders), dearly beloved third son of the late John Macfarlane RITCHIE of Belvraid, Dunedin, and of Mrs Ritchie, and beloved husband of Irene Mary Ritchie, aged 36 years.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3257, 16 AUGUST 1916
Advice has come to hand stating that Captain Thomas Harry KINDER, of the 7th Suffolks, England, who was reported missing some weeks ago has been killed in action on the Flanders front. The late Captain Kinder was an ex-Student of Wanganui College.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3258, 23 AUGUST 1916
...his Majesty the King also conferred the Military Cross upon a large number of officers, among them being Captain Eric Francis Wallace MACKENZIE [MCKENZIE], R.A.M.C. (Wellington, son of Dr F. Wallace Mackenzie).
Mr Lawrence Galway WALKER (Gisborne), who has been in England for five years, has been appointed engineer sub-lieutenant, Royal Naval Reserve.
Mr Rowland David Underwood TODD and Mr [Esmond Samuel ?] DE BEER, jun. (Dunedin) have joined the O.T.C. for artillery instruction.
Lieutenant William David BATHGATE, R.A.M.C. (Dunedin) is attached to the 18th Welsh Regiment, and is at the Aisne Camp, Blackdown.
Second Lieutenant Joseph Arthur Burdett HELLABY, Royal Engineers (Auckland), has now his rank of first lieutenant, as also has Second Lieutenant Roger GOULD, R.F.A. (Christchurch).
Lieutenant-colonel Alfred Edgar GLASGOW, of the Royal Sussex Regiment, has been wounded. He is an old boy of Nelson College, and was with the relief force at Chitral in 1895 for which he received the medal with clasp. Two years later he was again fighting on the North-west Frontier of India, receiving a second clasp to his medal, and immediately afterwards he took part in the Tirah expedition, obtaining a third clasp.
Major William James Theodore GLASGOW, Reserve of Officers, has been promoted from lieutenant colonel, Royal West Surrey Regiment, to be temporary brigadier-general attached to Headquarters Units. He too is an old boy of Nelson College, and was the first from that school to gain a commission in the Imperial Army.
Mr Francis Alexander (Frank) WILSON (Napier) has a commission in the 1st Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
Mr F. G. MANSON [?] (Masterton) arrived in London on Saturday, after a safe journey by the Tainui, and hopes to take up some form of war work.
Temporary Lieutenant David Mitchell TOMLINSON, 13th (Service) Battalion, Royal Scots, who obtained his commission about a year ago from the 2nd King Edward's Horse, is today gazetted temporary captain, and from temporary captain to be temporary major.
Mr Norman De Kuyper WAYMOUTH (late of Parnell) has a commission in the Royal Engineers. Until coming to England to offer his services he had been, engaged in the Argentine for some time as civil engineer.
Mr S. F. SMITH [?] (Auckland), who was unfit for military service, has been engaged at munition work since he arrived in London in November.
Mr Walter James FARMER (Marton) arrived just too late to get into the air service, so for the present he has joined the British Ambulance, Service de Sante Militaire, which is attached to the French Army and he expects to leave for France any day now with a new 50 h.p. Austin ambulance, which has been presented by an English parish. Mr Farmer hopes later to be able to enter the aviation branch.
Mr Harold Winstone BUTTERWORTH (Wanganui College), who was killed in action at Loos, was at the time holding the temporary rank of captain, having command of a company of the Rifle Brigade. The appointment, which was dated three weeks before he was killed, has just been gazetted.
Lieutenant Trevor Noel HOLMDEN, 15th Battalion Worcester Regiment, has been slightly wounded in Mesopotamia, where he was with the new force for the relief of General Townshend. Mr Holmden (who belongs to Auckland) was a member of the Main Body N.Z.E.F., from which he obtained his commission in the Worcester Regiment. He served at Suvla and in both the evacuations of the peninsula and after this his battalion was sent to Mesopotamia.
New Zealanders officially gazetted to the Royal Flying Corps have during the last few days included: - William Stanley SHIRTCLIFFE (Wellington), George Edmund Vernon AIMER (Auckland), and James Duff HEWETT. They have commissions as second lieutenants.
Lieutenant William James CLACHAN, Middlesex Regiment, Wellington, has been promoted to the rank of captain, to date from the end of March.
Major Henry Owen KNOX, C.M.G.. has been promoted assistant quartermaster-general, retaining his temporary rank of lieutenant colonel.
Commander Bernard Cecil FREYBERG, D.S.O., has returned to the base of the Royal Naval Division at Lemnos, after spending a few weeks leave in London.
Major Frank Berners KNYVETT, R.F.A. (Auckland), has been wounded in France.
Major-general Richard Hutton DAVIES, C.B., who went to France last July in command of the 20th Division, B.E.F.. has now been transferred to England, where he is commanding one of the reserve centres.
Some further details of the deed of valour for which Lieutenant-colonel Joseph Cashmore FREETH (Wellington) received his D.S.O. are contained in Geneval Smuts's despatch on the East African campaign. Our London corespondent states that Lieutenant-colonel Freeth had orders to take his battalion, the 7th South African Infantry, by a detour, to make good the Latema Height, to the north of the line of advance from Taveta. He fought his way up the hill, his party dwindling to 18 men. A few of the Rhodesians and Mounted Rifles joined him, and the party held on till daybreak. The main force attacked the neck between Latema and Reata Hills had prepared to retire, but Colonel Freeth's movement enabled the patrols to join with the hill forces, and the action resulted in dislodgement of the Germans from the whole of the rough forest country round Kilimanjaro. The British casualties were 270, and on Latema position alone 50 enemy dead were found. A 6 cm. gun, three machine guns, and ammunition and rifles were captured.
Mr James STRANG, late engineer to the Western Taieri Drainage Board, who recently returned Home, has enlisted and is now in camp with the Royal Engineers at Chatham, England, Mr Strang enlisted in New Zealand, but was rejected. Immediately on arrival in England he endeavoured to join the New Zealanders, but was again rejected. He then offered his services to the Imperial authorities, and was at once accepted, gaining a first class pass.
Lieutenant-colonel Andrew William ANDREW, who is well known in Christchurch, is now serving in Mesopotamia, in command of an Indian regiment. In a letter to his father, Mr John R. Andrew, Spreydon, dated June 3, the officer forwards some interesting particulars of life in that country. “The hot weather,” he states, “is in full swing here now, and I can assure you it is no joke living in tents. The rivers have overflowed their banks in all directions, and there is nothing but water for miles. Insects of all kinds abound in these marshes. Millions of small flies make it impossible to read or sit near a light at night, and so every night we see thousands of men sitting on the ground in the darkness waiting till if is time to go to bed. Sandflies and mosquitoes in myriads, bite one's hands and legs, and thousands of huge spiders make if dangerous to go about in bare feet. I saw one on my sleeve the other night. It was about as big as the top of a teacup. Everybody here will be glad to get out of this country, although for my part I must say I think the climate is bettor than that of India,”

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3259, 30 AUGUST 1916
The following members of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force are the nominees for commissions in the Imperial Forces for June, 1915: 7/491 Sergeant Paul Frederick DAWSON, Canterbury Mounted Rifle Regiment [Dragoon Guards], 12/331 Sergeant-Major Hector CAMERON, Auckland Battalion [York and Lancaster Regiment], 2/370 Gunner George Gordon De Courey DRURY, Divisional Artillery [Royal Scot Fusiliers], 5/270a [11/270] Sergeant George HOOD, Divisional Train [4th Reserve Regiment of Cavalry] 5/231 [24/231] Rifleman Arthur Cecil MUDFORD, 4th Battalion New Zealand Rifle Brigade
Lieutenant colonel A C PARKER of the Intelligence Department, who is mentioned for good service in the despatches from Egypt, is the son of Mrs Parker (late of Oamaru, and nephew of Lord Kitchener). He formerly held a commission in the South Canterbury Volunteers, and for some years past has been Governor of Sinai, the peninsula in Egypt across which the Turks have been operating against the Canal.
Our London correspondent writes that William Braithwaite MANSON, only son of Mr and Mrs William Manson, late of Dunedin, and grandson of Mr and Mrs Joseph Braithwaite, of this city, was killed in action on his birthday, the 1st July. He had joined the army in January of this year. Born in New Zealand, he was brought to England by his parents when quite a child, and at a very early age he displayed marked musical talent. He was the first New Zealand boy who had the privilege of admission to the world-famed choir of the Chapel Royal, St. James, and his general education was completed at the special school in connection with the Chapel Royal. The choristers have many privileges, and they are the recipients of lasting presents from royalty on occasions of special importance. Intending to make music his profession, Mr Manson joined the Royal Academy of Music, and before he was 18 years of age he was appointed Professor of Harmony. Ho gained three medals — for harmony, playing at sight, and singing. In July, 1915, he was awarded the Charles Lucas prize for composition, and half the Olivena-Prescott prize, and only this year, after joining the London Scottish, the Battison-Haynes prize for composition (piano, violoncello) was awarded him.
Mr Harold Ian Simson, of Hawke's Bay, has received advice that his youngest brother, Mr Herbert Cyrus [Herbert Waipu] SIMSON, has been appointed a lieutenant in the Royal Flying Corps in England.
Successful work has been done by Flight lieutenant Rollo Dunstan [Rudolph Dunstan] VAVASOUR, son of Mr H. D. Vavasour, Ugbrooke, Marlborough, as a member of a Flying Corps operating in Northern France. Having learned of a fine feat performed by him at the end of June, in which he brought down a German machine after an exciting combat, the Marlborough Express secured the following extract from a letter written by him on July 1: "Our aeroplanes are doing great work out here just now..."

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3260, 6 SEPTEMBER 1916
A few days ago Mrs F. WILDING, Opawa, received a cable message stating that her nephew, Major Percy ANTHONY, of the Welsh Regiment, had been killed in action in France (says the Christchurch Press). Major Anthony was a son of Mr Charles Anthony, a brother of the late Evangeline Anthony, and a cousin of Sir Robert Baden Powell and the late Anthony Wilding, killed at La Basseo last year. He volunteered from the Malay States in October, 1914, and being accepted, resigned his appointment at Batu Gajah, and was gazetted temporary captain in the Regiment. During the last six months he had been in the trenches "somewhere in France." A lieutenant in the contingent of Herefordshire Volunteers attached to the 2nd Shropshire Regiments during the South African war, he had the Queen's Medal with five clasps. An all-round athlete, he was in the front rank of cricketers.
Dr Marshall MACDONALD, of Dunedin, who for the past year occupied the position of medicin-major with the French forces, returned by the Arawa as medical officer. He reported that the health of the officers and men throughout the voyage was excellent.
News was received by last week's mail that Mr James Robert DENNISTOUN, of Peel Forest, who was reported wounded and missing when flying in France on June 26, with his cousin, Mr Herbert Bainbridge RUSSELL, is lying in a German hospital in the neighbourhood of Arras. His mother had had a letter from a Bavarian nurse stating that although very seriously wounded in the abdomen, they hoped to take him through. When the mail left nothing had been heard of his cousin, who was the pilot of the biplane in which Mr Dennistoun was acting us observer.
Word has been received by the Hon. Arthur Myers that his brother, Captain Leopold Mielziner (Leo) MYERS, of the King's Royal Rifles, has been promoted to a brigade staff appointment. The captain who took Captain Myers's place in the trenches, and a sergeant-major, were killed next day. Captain Myers had been on duty in the trenches for two months prior to his appointment to his present position.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3261, 13 SEPTEMBER 1916
Dr Marshall MACDONALD, who for the past year has occupied the position of medecin major with the French forces, returned to Dunedin on the 6th by the second express. Dr Macdonald came out from London as medical officer with the troops on the Arawa.
Cable advice from London, received in Dunedin last week, intimates that Lieutenant John Edward HUNT of the staff of Wright Stephenson and Co. (Ltd) has been granted a commission in the Royal Flying Corps.
Word has been received by Mr William Thomas NELSON, of Napier (says the Hawke's Bay Herald), that his second son (Mr David NELSON) has been promoted to lieutenant in the Royal Flying Corps.
Flight-lieutenant Samuel Howard ELLIS, of Auckland, recently reported missing, having landed in the enemy's lines, has cabled his father (Mr H. J. Ellis, of New Lynn) that he is a prisoner in Germany, wounded in the leg and cheek, but otherwise doing well.
Lieutenant Harold BUTTERWORTH, of Auckland, who was killed whilst flying in France on July 15 was within three days of his twenty-first birthday when he met his death.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3262, 20 SEPTEMBER 1916
Our London correspondent reports that Captain Robert Williams MICHELL, M.D., F.R.C.S., R.A.M.C., son-in-law of the late Mr Robert Gillies, of Dunedin was fatally wounded on July 3. After helping a neighbouring medical officer, who was in great difficulties, Captain Michell organised and led a rescue party to bring in wounded men who had been lying out in "No Man's Land" for two days. Although wounded himself, he continued his work for some hours, when he was struck a second time and paralysed. He leaves a widow and one son aged eight years. [CWGC - Husband of E. S. Michell, of "Birtley," Cranmer Rd., Cambridge.]
Our London correspondent writes that Lieutenant Frederick Robert Benson JOWITT, of the West Yorkshire Regiment — a son of the late Mr J. H. Jowitt, formerly of Dunedin, who was reported to be killed, was subsequently gazetted wounded, and is in the Third London General Hospital, where he is making good progress from multiple wounds.
Our London correspondent writes Captain James Lloyd FINDLAY, East Surrey Regiment, son of Sir John Findlay, has recovered sufficiently to be able to leave the Military Hospital, Somerville, Oxford, for a convalescent hospital in Sussex, near Crowborough. He had four or five shrapnel wounds in the leg above the ankle, being hit early on the morning of July 3 at the battle of the Somme, while leading his company up to the firing line. The trenches were blown away in parts, and Captain Findlay was out in the open when a shell burst, which killed many and wounded a number more. Captain John Wilfred FINDLAY, King's Royal Rifles, happens to be at the same convalescent hospital as his brother. He has got over his operation very well, but is not strong yet.
Our London correspondent advises that the following promotions of members of the Imperial General Staff, now serving in New Zealand, appear in the London Gazette: While employed with the New Zealand Forces — Lieutenant-colonel Charles Monk GIBBON, Royal Irish Fusiliers, to be temporary colonel. Major Clarence Reginald MACDONALD, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, to be lieutenant-colonel. Colonel Gibbon has held the post of Chief of the General Staff, New Zealand Defence Forces, since the outbreak of the war, while Lieutenant-colonel Macdonald has filled the position of chief infantry instructor in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force training camps.
Mr Charles BAYLY, of Toko, Taranaki, formerly a doughty football representative, has received a commission in the Devonshire Yeomanry.
Lieutenant Reginald Marcus STERNDALE (1st Loyal North Lancashire), who was dangerously wounded in January in France, is expected in Auckland by the Niagara on September 17. Lieutenant Sterndale has been granted four months leave from his regiment.
Mrs T. E. BOWES, Fairlie, has received cable advice that her brother, Lieutenant John Edward HUNT, formerly of Timaru, has been granted a commission in the Royal Flying Corps.
Lieutenant (temporary captain) Rainsford BALCOMBE BROWN, R.F.A., Special Reserve, and Royal Flying Corps, has been awarded the Military Gross "for conspicuous gallantry and skill." He is the son of Mr and Mrs Balcombe Brown, of Wellington. He attacked an enemy kite balloon and brought it down in flames. He was flying in a type of machine unfamiliar to him, owing to the absence, through wounds, of the regular pilots. At dawn he commenced to learn the machine, and the same evening brought down the kite.
According to advice just received by Mr Wesley Spragg, of Mount Albert, regarding his son, Lieutenant Wesley Neal SPRAGG, Royal Flying Corps, the latter is making a rapid recovery from an accident which befell him in the course of a flight from Yarmouth to Norwich (says the Auckland Star). As he was nearing the Norwich aerodrome the engine of his machine jammed, forcing the propeller off and breaking the rudder control. Lieutenant Spragg had succeeded in planing down to within 50ft of the ground, when the nose of the machine suddenly dipped, and it dived straight to earth. Both the lieutenant and his observer jumped clear, the former receiving injuries to one shoulder and losing some teeth, as the result of his fall. The machine was completely wrecked, and had the two men remained in their seats they would almost certainly have been crushed to death in the debris. Lieutenant Spragg had another fall about two months ago, being thrown out of his seat at a height of about 15ft. He fell head-first through the tail-planes of his machine, which broke his fall to some extent. He was wearing an aviator's steel cap, which saved him from serious injury. He saw service recently over the lines in France, and was present at the commencement of the Somme offensive. He hopes to be soon out of hospital and at work again.
The following is the official list of naval ratings returning to New Zealand, who are due to arrive at Wellington on the 28th inst. in the Wimmera. With the exception of Able Seaman FOREMAN and Stoker BURROUGHS, both of whom have been invalided from H.M.S. Philomel, all the men mentioned are on leave from H.M.S. Pyramus. If circumstances permit they will be dispersed to their homes on the day of arrival. From H.M.S. Pyramus: Able Seamen John MOTION, James FYFE, Henry C. DOMENY, Frederick J. BOWERS, Leslie P. LOCK, Charles H. PETERSON, Frederick C. P. KERMODE, Harold T. BLOOMFIELD, Frederick J. MAISEY, George A. ALEXANDER, Robert H. HUCKS, John HAY, Harry HAY, Ansley A. MOORE, Robert M. GIBSON, Ernest M. SMITH, Ernest W. PETERSEN, Henry O. STONE, James R. DONOVAN, Eric O. MANEY, Arthur W. CROSS, Ordinary Seamen Charles B. J. TAYLOR, Arthur T. WALLER, Thomas H. G. HULLACH. Boy: First class, Ronald T. INGS (ordinary seaman), Harold T. M. WATSON, Herbert R. WALKER (signalmen), John M. ARMSTRONG (leading stoker), Stokers James KENNEY, Thomas A. BOND, Frederick G. O'NEIL, Frederick McCULLOUGH, David RIGBY, Sidney MURRAY, Sydney W. FRY, Dennis CLIFFORD, Joseph GRAY, John W. TAYLOR, Percy PALMER, Charles W. VOGEL, Martinius ANDERSON, Arthur AVERY, Leslie R. B. CHANEY, William E. MCGORMAN, Robert P. LESTER, Gordon S. DOILE, Frederick J. DARLOW, William E. HARVEY, Percival J. MORRIS, Wilfred R. WILDEY, Archibald SWAIN, Alfred A. M. PULLEN, Albert H. FRAME, Henry J. PILBROW, Frederick V. EVANS. Armourer's crew: Charles W. PETERSON. Carpenters' crew: Arthur B. COURTENAY (plumber), Henry J. HOPKINS (blacksmith's mate), Eric R. H. MAGNUSSON (third writer). From H.M.S. Philomel: Francis R. FOREMAN (able seaman), Henry W. BURROUGHS (stoker), invalided.
News by cable has been received by his parents that Lieutenant Eric Oakley PRYCE, of the Royal Field Artillery, son of Mr and Mrs Pryce, of Halcombe, has been awarded the Military Cross. He was promoted to be first lieutenant about two months ago.
Mr C. Fynmore, of Dunedin, has received word by cablegram that his son [Noel Nelson Lovell FYNMORE] has been given a commission in the Royal Field Artillery, and will leave for France immediately. He has gone through his training in an Officers' Training Camp at Exeter, and has been successful in getting through his examinations.
Mr and Mrs W. G. Hutton, of the Hutt road, Petone, have for some time been mourning the loss of their son, Mr Albert Ernest HUTTON who was supposed to have been lost H.M.S. Hampshire (says the Wellington Post). They have now received a letter from their son, which states that, just prior to the last trip of the ill-fated ship, he was transferred to another vessel.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3263, 27 SEPTEMBER 1916
Sergeant James BURY of the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, brother of Mrs Alice Blundell HOWELL, of Omahanui, Wairoa, has been awarded the D.C.M. for gallant services in France, in holding an important position, after all his men had been killed or wounded.
Mr Sams, Balmoral Station, has received word (says the Timaru Herald) that his son, Second-lieutenant Frank Douglas Home SAMS, Royal Flying Corps, has been reported missing since September 3, in France.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3265, 11 OCTOBER 1916
Our London correspondent writes, under date August 24: "A New Zealander who has seen the war almost from the beginning, and in various aspects, is this week awarded the Military Cross. Mr Eric CROFT (Dunedin) had just commenced his medical studies at London Hospital when the war broke out, and he wont at once with the Red Cross to Brussels. He was there when the Germans occupied the town, and was kept prisoner for two months, when he managed to reach England by a circuitous route. He then joined a clearing hospital of the R.A.M.C. in the Ypres salient, and remained with it for a few months; spent a few more weeks with an Indian hospital at Hardelot and came back at the end of 1914 to resume his medical studies. Three months later he passed his second professional examination. Student's life, however, was not sufficiently active for him, and he left it again to qualify for a combatant commission. This he obtained in the Royal Field Artillery (Special Reserve), and he has been at the front with his battery for some months past. He has now been awarded the Military Cross for an act described as follows in the official gazette: "When proceeding under orders to gain information as to the position of our front line, he encountered a hostile party, consisting of an officer and 35 men who showed fight; but with an infantry officer and two bombers only he forced the whole party to surrender."
A welcome home social was tendered at East Taieri on the 9th to Seaman Ronald INGS, of the H.M.S. Philomel, an East Taieri boy, who had been absent for about three years. Mr Miller presided, and opened the evening with an appropriate speech. During the programme addresses were delivered by Professor Bedford, Mr James Eogg, and the Rev. A. W. Kinmont. Professor Bedford, on behalf of the residents, presented Seaman Ings with a handsome gold albert and pendant, suitably inscribed, and in so doing wished the recipient every success in his career. The audience sang "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow."

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3266, 18 OCTOBER 1916
The High Commissioner has received from Flight Lieutenant Samuel Howard ELLIS, a son of Mr H. Ellis, of Auckland, a letter written from a German military hospital. Lieutenant Ellis, who took part in the great aerial raid which accompanied the opening of the Somme offensive, writes: - "I was brought down by an anti-aircraft gun on July 3, having been hit in the left leg (which was broken) and put out of action and in the right cheek. The leg is the more serious, and that is only a matter of a few weeks. I was a bit seedy for a day or so, but am now mending rapidly. I have been treated with the most wonderful kindness by all ranks throughout, from the man who lifted me out of my machine (which was smashed) to the very able surgeon who now attends me."

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3267, 25 OCTOBER 1916
The official details of the circumstances in which Lieutenant Eric Oakley PRYCE, son of Mr Herbert Pryce of Kakariki, Halcombe, was awarded the Military Cross "for gallantry and steadiness under fire," relate that on August 15 Lieutenant Pryce's battery (D Battery, 105th Howitzer Brigade R.F.A), position was west of Mametz Wood. "The position was shelled, a gun was hit, and the men of the detachment wounded. Lieutenant Pryce, assisted by B.S.M. Porter and Gunner Day, tended the wounded under fire, and in five minutes had the gun in action, and continued the bombardment. "On August 8 a gun of this battery was hit, and the ammunition in the pit exploded. The gun was thrown a distance of 40 yards, and the men of the detachment in the shelter trench were buried by the displaced earth. Lieutenant Pryce showed great coolness in organising and directing a digging party, which, after an hour's work under fire, recovered the whole detachment, "Lieutenant Pryce had to take over the battery on July 31, when the battery commander was wounded, and he has given a very praiseworthy exhibition of coolness and gallantry for so young an officer."

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3268, 1 NOVEMBER 1916
Mr Stanley Morell MACALISTER, son of Mrs C. H. MacAlister, Invercargill, has obtained his commission as lieutenant in the Royal Horse Artillery ("The Heavies").
The following members of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force are the August nominees for commissions in the Imperial Forces: 5/45a Staff Sergeant-major Halavanco [George Gordon] LEAKE, Divisional Train [Royal Field Artillery], Sapper W. CALTHORPE, Divisional Signal Service [?], 7/736 Driver Ernest Hardy JOHNSTONE, Field Artillery. 15/96 Sergeant-major Melville Arthur WHITE, Headquarters New Zealand Expeditionary Force [Royal Flying Corps], 11584 Sergeant Hubert Philip SOLOMON, Cycling Corps [Royal Flying Corps].

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3269, 8 NOVEMBER 1916
Lieutenant Frank Irwin RUTHERFURD (Royal Field Artillery), Onewhero, who was recently awarded the Military Cross, is on sick leave.
Mr Charles Vigor BROWN, of Napier, has been accepted as a sub-lieutenant in the Motor Boat Patrol.
General Sir A. J. Murray's despatches from Egypt, where he relieved General Maxwell as Commander-in-Chief, have just been published. Amongst the officers whose services are mentioned are: Temporary Captain Robert Haldane MAKGILL, R.A.M.C. Dr Makgill was chief sanitary officer for the Alexandria district until May of this year, when he relinquished his commission and returned to New Zealand.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3270, 15 NOVEMBER 1916
The Rev. G. F. Stockwell, of Waimate, has received word of the death of his brother, Corporal Arthur Hallgath STOCKWELL, in action in France (says the Times). The deceased enlisted in Canada, where for some years he had been farming, joining the 46th Battalion of the Canadian Scottish. After finishing his training in England he was sent to the western front. [CWGC - Son of Henry and Elizabeth Stockwell, of Sproxton Manor, Sproxton, Leicestershire, England; husband of Mabel Annie Stockwell, of 9, Stratford Rd., West Bridgford, Nottingham, England.]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3271, 22 NOVEMBER 1916
Major Hubbard, officer commanding the No. 11 Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps in France, in a letter to Mr Justice Cooper, says: “I have to confirm the sad news that your gallant son [Herbert Ambrose COOPER] was killed yesterday morning about 9 o'clock. His Nieuport Scout fell when about 200 ft up, and he died a quarter of an hour afterwards without recovering consciousness. I am glad to say that he suffered no pain at all. He was buried this afternoon with as full military honours as was possible under active service conditions. About 15 of his brother officers, 80 N.C.O.'s and men, and a firing party followed him to the graveyard, where the service was conducted by Captain Ford, the Presbyterian army chaplain. As wood and labour are very scarce here, coffins are not generally provided, but two of the N.C.O.s and a mechanic, all skilled wood-workers, voluntarily gave up their night's rest last night and made one, in which he was buried. On a brass plate, screwed to the lid, the following inscription was punched, as we had no materials for engraving: ‘Captain H. A. Cooper, R.F.C., S.R. Killed on active service. 21/6/16. Honoured and respected by all.' I cannot adequately tell you how much we all loved and admired your son. To me it is a very great personal loss. Not only was he a most admirable flight commander, a highly-skilled flyer, and a most intrepid fighter, but he was the cleanest, straightest, truest man I have ever met. He has had very many fights in the air — his last on the 18th, when he pursued 11 hostile aeroplanes, and attacked them single-handed. He has left a gap in the squadron that cannot be filled, but we shall always remember him with pride and affection. With very sincere sympathy with you, believe me, yours sincerely, T. O'B. Hubbard, major."
The High Commissioner states that he recently learn't that Captain Ernest Tristem Rupert CARLYON, of the 10th Sherwood Foresters, is a prisoner of war in Germany, at Crefeld. "Captain Carlyon has lost an eye, and he suffered severely from exposure after being wounded. Before capture he lay in the trench for 36 hours, with snow falling all night, and he contracted a severe attack of inflammation of the lungs in consequence. His mother lives at Napier, and I am making inquiries on her behalf as to the reason of the non-delivery of her letters to him."
The Ladies Emergency Committee of the Navy League has also furnished the name of Able Seaman William Leonard CLEMAS of H.M.S. Nestor, a prisoner of war at Brandenburg. His mother lives at Wairoa, Hawke's Bay.
The London Scottish Old Comrades Association reports that 5108, Lance-corporal Hugh BROWN, of the 1st London (Scottish Battalion), is a prisoner at Dulmen in Westphalia. "His people live in Wanganui," says the High Commissioner. "It has been arranged that the London Scottish Association shall in future supply Lance-corporal Brown with bread and tobacco, whilst a weekly supply of food will be despatched from this office."

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3273, 6 DECEMBER 1916
The Otago Yacht and Motor Boat Club on Monday in the Arcadia Tea Rooms entertained the Otago and Southland men who have been accepted for service in the Motor Boat Patrol. The guests were Ernest Victor SMITH, George McKNIGHT, George Henry GREEN, Henry Eric CLARK, Lionel Alfred HOOKE, William. A. H. GORDON [?], Arthur Bruce WELCH, Walter Harold HISLOP, Herbert Robert COLE, Walter Herbert HODGINS, William Henry SELL, Hector James MCBEATH, Philip Corliss GANNAWAY, Arthur James DEAN, Alexander Walter WYLIE, and Douglas Arthur Hagar SMALL (Invercargill).
Lieutenant John Gordon CLIFF-McCULLOCH, R.N.R., has been awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for heroism during the Jutland battle. He acted with great courage and skill after a portion of his ship was set on fire by an enemy shell. The orders say: "His prompt action and example had undoubtedly a good effect, on the large number of very young men stationed there." Lieutenant Cliff-McCulloch had retired from the navy as medically unfit (heart trouble, after rheumatic fever), and was farming in the Pohangina district when the war broke out. He jumped at an opportunity of getting away on the Philomel shortly afterwards as an intelligence officer, and eventually signed on with the Grand Fleet. He is well-known in Dannevirke, where he was farming for a time.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3275, 20 DECEMBER 1916
Following is the last draft of New Zealand recruits selected for the Imperial Navy Motor Boat Patrol: — Sub-lieutenants: Robert Andrew ADAMS, Auckland; Henry Clive ARMITAGE, Auckland; Berie William BEAUMONT, Auckland; Grafton Francis BOTHAMLEY, Wellington; Seymour Grey Thorne GEORGE, Auckland; Robert Withers GUNSON, Auckland; John Wilson Laurie STUBBS, Auckland; Luther Martin HARE, Remuera; Harold Elmslie GOODWIN, Wanganui; George Crichton MALTBY, Tauranga; H. HAMILTON [?], Wellington; Thomas PIERARD, Wellington; J. S. HINDS, Christchurch; Hubert Alexander RHIND, Lyttelton; Chief motor mechanic: Percy Cauty LOASBY, Christchurch. The draft leaves towards the end of the month.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3276, 27 DECEMBER 1916
The Wairarapa Daily Times, referring to the awarding of the Military Cross to Captain Norman Henry PRIOR, R.A.M.C., of Masterton, for going over a parapet on the western front and dressing wounded men under intense fire, says: "Masterton soldiers at the front have repeatedly referred to the splendid manner in which Dr Prior has always carried out his duties. Amongst the sick and wounded Dr Prior's work has been invaluable, and he has not spared himself in order to ease the sufferings of our soldiers. The men under his care speak in terms of high praise of his devotion to duty and the risks which he took in order to attend to wounded soldiers."

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3277, 3 JANUARY 1917
Mr S'Sendalg HUTTON (son of the late Mr David Con Hutton, principal of the Dunedin School of Art) was second engineer of the Indian Steam Navigation Company's Itonus, which was torpedoed in the Mediterranean a few days ago. A cable message from Malta has been received by Mrs D. C. Hutton announcing the fact. [Did 03 January 1936 Bombay, India]
The following members of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force are the September nominees for commissions in the Imperial Forces: 9/1441 Sergeant John Edward HUNT, Otago Mounted Rifles [Royal Flying Corps]; 13/102 Trooper Matthew Roland FARRER, Auckland Mounted Rifles [Machine Gun Corps]; 11/793 Sergeant James Macgregor MORRISON Wellington Mounted Rifles [Middlesex Regiment]; 26/1029 Sergeant Robert Alexander RUTHERFORD/RUTHERFURD, New Zealand Rifle Brigade [Royal Engineers]. The names of Staff Sergeant-major Halavanco [George Gordon] LEAKE and Driver Ernest Hardy JOHNSTONE, have been deleted from the list of August nominees for Imperial commissions, and the following substituted therefor: 6/931 Q.M.S. Reginald Henry SHIPTON, 1st Battalion Canterbury Regiment; and 6/2047 Corporal Anthony Darley Russel RENDLE, 2nd Battalion Canterbury Regiment [Devonshire Regiment].

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3278, 10 JANUARY 1917
Word has been received by cable that Captain Ivan Stuart WILSON, R.A.M.C, has received the Military Cross. Captain Wilson is an "old boy" of the Otago Boys' High School, and passed through the Otago University, where he obtained his medical degree. Subsequently, while superintendent of Napier Hospital, he took the degree of M.D., New Zealand. Later on he went to London, and obtained the fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons, and when the war commenced he was resident surgeon of the London Chelsea Hospital for women's diseases. He was amongst the earliest of British medical men to volunteer for the war, and went to France with the British Expeditionary Force in August, 1914. He was wounded in the right lung on September 10, 1916. and is at present on convalescent leave in the South of England

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3280, 24 JANUARY 1917
Lieutenant Maurice William Campbell SPROTT, eldest son of the Bishop of Wellington, has been mentioned in despatches. He was wounded for the second time on September 15, and was sent to England for hospital treatment. He has now recovered and returned to the front recently. Lieutenant Sprott volunteered over two years ago, and received a commission as second lieutenant in the 9th Norfolks. He was recently made battalion bombing officer.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3281, 31 JANUARY 1917
A private letter from Lieutenant Alexander Manson Moncrieff FINLAYSON (of the South Lancashires), dated November 22, states that he had almost recovered from the injury to his left eye. A shell had burst near him and the backblast caught his eye. He expected soon to be discharged from hospital, and to join the reserve battalion of his regiment...
The Rev. S. Griffith, of the Dundas Street Methodist Church, has just received word from his son, Flight Sub-lieutenant James Clarence GRIFFITH [GRIFFITHS], of the Royal Flying Corps, that he has graduated as a fully qualified airman, and is proceeding to France. Lieutenant Griffith entered Exeter College, Oxford, in September, and passed the theoretical course in five weeks. This course is a comprehensive one, including rotary and stationary engines, the mechanism of aeroplanes, theory of flight, photography, meteorology, and astronomy, map-reading, and cross-country flying, signalling, Lewis machine gun, wireless, aerial and artillery observation, also various instruments, such as altometer, inclinometer, and velometer for registering height, inclination, and speed. Having passed the course Lieutenant Griffith next went to the Flying School at Netheravon, Wilts, where after flying with an instructor, in all three hours and twenty minutes, he was ready for his solo i.e the first flight alone. To pass the test of proficiency a man must fly alone successfully for three hours and make 10 landings. This was accomplished in one morning without accident, and he was then promoted to Upavon, Wilts, for higher instruction where he has secured his "wings" and is ordered to France. His brother, Private W. S. C. Griffith, of the Fourteenth Reinforcements, who has been seriously ill with pneumonia in France was recently sent to the New Zealand General Hospital, Brockenhurst. Yesterday's messages states that he is now convalescent.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3282, 7 FEBRUARY 1917
The following members of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force have been nominated for commissions in the Imperial Forces. October Nominees - 15/94 Corporal Charles Kingsley MILLS, Auckland Mounted Rifles [Royal Flying Corps]; 10737 Sergeant Arnold MORRISON, Cyclist Corps; 11/285 Lance-corporal Angus McDonald HYSLOP, Wellington Mounted Rifles [Royal Air Force]; 4/402 Sapper Henry GRAY, New Zealand Engineers [Royal Engineers]. November Nominees - 7/619 Sergeant Gordon Buchan CHRYSTALL, Canterbury Mounted Rifles [Royal Field Artillery] 11/763a Sergeant Francis Cyril FOSSETT, Wellington Mounted Rifles [Reserve Regiment of Cavalry], 4/423 Lance-corporal Nathaniel MALCOLM, New Zealand Engineers [Royal Engineers] 10/2809 Private John Willoughby Hadfield MARSHALL, Wellington Infantry Brigade [York and Lancaster Regiment], 4/1078 Sergeant Seymour Thomason SPENCER, New Zealand Engineers [Royal Engineers].

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3283, 14 FEBRUARY 1917
Mr J. C. Simpson, of Waipukurau, has been advised by the Defence Department that his son, Lieutenant Hector Joseph SIMPSON, was killed during an engagement with the enemy in East Africa in January. Deceased, who was 35 years of age, took part in the Boer war. After visiting Waipukurau at the close of that struggle, he returned to South Africa and joined the South African Police. When he met his death he was attached to a Rhodesian Native Regiment.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3286, 7 MARCH 1917
A cable message was received in Sydney on February 16 from the War Office that Second Lieutenant George Fortescue PERSTON, Royal Field Artillery, only son of Mr N. M. F. Perston, of the Bank of New Zealand, Sydney, and grandson of the late Mr W Robertson Perston, was killed in action in the Balkans on February 12. THe deceased officer, who was 30 years of age, was born at Dunedin, and was educated at the Waitaki High School and at Nelson College, and from the latter he joined the staff of the Bank of New Zealand in Nelson, subsequently taking to farming in the Auckland district. He left New Zealand in November 1915 for England, where he obtained a commission in the Royal Field Artillery soon after his arrival.
Lieutenant Sidney Murray WREN, son of Mr James Wren, of Dunedin has been awarded the Military Cross for distinguished service in the field. He was an Otago High School boy. He went to Canada, and was in journalistic work when the war broke out. He volunteered with the Canadians and went to England. Being laid low there with pneumonia, he could not cross the Channel with his corps. They were gassed, and nearly all died. Reporting to the War Office as soon as fit, young Wren was appointed as a military attache to the diplomatic commission to the Allies and the neutral nations. Then he served as an attache to the Atrocities Commission. Returning to England from Belgium, he was made a lieutenant in the Royal Engineers and placed on General Fitton's staff. He served with the 101st Division in France for two years, and was wounded at the Somme. He is now recovering at Ilford.
Major-general Richard Hutton DAVIES, a New Zealand officer, who has been loaned to the Imperial authorities, has relinquished his rank and appointment on the New Zealand Staff Corps on being transferred to the Imperial Army as from February, 1915.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3288, 21 MARCH 1917
The official story is now told of the "valour and utter contempt of danger" of Lieutenant-colonel Bernard Cecil FREYBERG in the great charge of the Royal Naval Division. It states: — "Captain (temporary Lieutenant-colonel) Bernard Cyril Freyberg, D.S.O., Royal West Surrey Regiment and Royal Naval Division. For most conspicuous bravery and brilliant leading as a battalion commander. By his splendid personal gallantry he carried the initial attack straight through the enemy's front system of trenches. Owing to mist and heavy fire of all descriptions, Lieutenant-colonel Freyberg's command was much disorganised after the capture of the first objective. He personally rallied and reformed his men, including men from other units who had become intermixed. He inspired all with his own contempt of danger. At the appointed time he led his men to the successful assault of the second objective — many prisoners being captured. During this advance he was twice wounded. He again rallied and reformed all who were with him, and, although unsupported in a very advanced position, he held his ground for the remainder of the day and throughout the night, under heavy artillery and machine gun fire. When reinforced on the following morning, he organised the attack on a strongly-fortified village, and showed a fine example of dash in personally leading the assault, capturing the village and 500 prisoners. In this operation he was again wounded. Later in the afternoon he was again wounded severely, but refused to leave the line till he had issued final instructions. The personality, valour, and utter contempt of danger on the part of this single officer enabled the lodgment in the most advanced objective of the corps to be permanently held, and on this point d'appui the line was eventually formed.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3289, 28 MARCH 1917
Five pupils at the New Zealand Flying School have passed the flight test for the Royal Aero Club's pilot's certificate, namely: Henry Hugh BLACKWELL, Kaiapoi; John Leask FOUBISTER, Epsom; Douglas Gray GEORGE, Wellington; Kenneth James GOULD, Napier and William Francis WARNER, Christchurch.
Mr Thomas John Marr TODD, a former resident of Auckland, who left Australia as a major of the Light Horse, has been promoted to the rank of Brigadier-general. Mr Todd was well known in business and sporting circles in Auckland. He served with the New Zealanders during the Boer war, and was awarded the D.S.O. He also left as a member of the New Zealand Contingent sent to England at the Coronation of the late King. He later left for Western Australia and settled in Perth. He was promoted to the rank of colonel, and from advice received in Auckland, he has now been appointed Brigadier-General.
Mr William Arthur CURZON-SIGGERS writes under date January 16: "On Sunday afternoon I had a telephone message from Eric Oswald HERCUS that he and Captain James Garfield STEWART (both of whom I knew well at Otago University) were in town, so I went up hurriedly to London to meet them. I got to their hotel in Piccadilly about 6 p.m., and then we three went to Westminster Abbey for the 7 p.m. service. Hercus has now a scientific job in the R.N.V.R., with lieutenant's rank, and is on the staff at Dover. Stewart is captain in the N.Z.A.C.S., and has just got the Military Cross. It was a very happy reunion. At the Abbey we got good seats behind the choir in the stalls. After service we went to the Regent Palace Hotel and had dinner and a talk over old times. I have now left the Y.M.C.A. hut at Crayford, and am in charge of a New Zealand Y.M.C.A..hut at Sling Camp. I was very happy in working at the former place, but have longed to get amongst New Zealand men. Though my new work will involve more roughing it, yet I shall feel at home amongst our own men. It will be nice to be near Chaplain-captain Bush-King even for a little, though he may move soon. The Christmas dinner in London to the New Zealand men on leave there (to which I contributed £8O sent from St. Matthew's) was a great success, and the men had a splendid time — dinner, concert, and dance. It was a great factor in making a real Christmas for our New Zealand men."

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3292, 18 APRIL 1917
Mrs Verne Hargreaves, of Weston road, Christchurch, has received advice from London that the name of her brother — Second Lieutenant Norman CUNNINGHAM, of the Royal Field Artillery — has appeared in the New Year's honours list as mentioned in despatches for distinguished field service (in the battles of Combles and Morval). Lieutenant Cunningham is the youngest son of the late Mr Peter Cunningham, of Merivale. All Mr Cunningham's sons have enlisted. One has been in Gallipoli, one in Mesopotamia, and one in France. Miss Cunningham is doing war work in England. She has been for the last year a forewoman in Woolwich Arsenal.
Private advice has been received by Mrs W. Bloomfield, Gisborne, to the effect that her son, Flight-commandeer William Swanson Read BLOOMFIELD, has been officially reported a prisoner of war in Germany. Flight-commander Bloomfield was reported missing early in March. Commander Bloomfield at one time resided in Auckland. When war broke out he was at Home studying architecture, and he enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps. Shortly before falling into the enemy's hands he was promoted to flight-commander.
Private cable advice has been received that Captain William Fisher TOMLINSON, of the Royal Engineers, has been severely wounded in France. His injuries include a fractured jaw, and the loss of a leg. Captain Tomlinson, who is a Dunedin boy, and an old Otago School of Mines student, went early in the war from copper mines in Central Korea to England to enlist.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3293, 25 APRIL 1917
A soldier from Dunedin, Commandant James WADDELL of the French Legion was recently in London for a few days leave. Commandant Waddell has had a very distinguished career in the French army, and the Chinese medal, obtained for work in Pekin, the Sahara medal, Sahara clasp and the Moroccan medal. In 1914 he was awarded the Legion of Honour for military services. He served with French Expeditionary Force to the Dardanelles, was mentioned in army despatches, promoted, and received the Croix de Guerre with the Palm Leaf. He was wounded at Helles, again mentioned in despatches, and received a second Palm Leaf. In October, Commandant Waddell was fighting in Champagne, and in July last went to the Somme, where, with his battalion, he took the village of Belloy-en-Santerre. He was again mentioned in despatches and received a third Palm Leaf. Commandant Waddell is an ex-Cromwell boy, and is a brother of Mrs Jolly, whose husband was killed in France some time ago.
Lieutenant Henry Daniel WILLIAMS, Auckland Mounted Rifles, who was to have been transferred to the Royal Flying Corps and struck off the strength of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, has had his transfer canceled.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3294, 2 MAY 1917
A private cablegram has been received stating that Flight-lieutenant John Herbert COCK, of Nelson, who recently proceeded to France, has been missing since April 14. [CWGC - Son of Joseph Henry and Elizabeth Mary Cock, of Nelson, New Zealand. Also served with New Zealand Expeditionary Force at Gallipoli, and in Egypt.]
Mrs Fowler, sen., of Bluff, received a cablegram on the 21st that, her son Henry FOWLER, 29 years of age, who left on December 5 in the motor boat patrol, had died of pneumonia at Haslar Hospital, Southampton. [CWGC - Service Number MB/1938 Died 19/04/1917 Aged 28 H.M.S. "Hermione" Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3295, 9 MAY 1917
General Godley has nominated the following for temporary commissions in the Royal Artillery: M.S. Artificer Donald Clyde INGLIS, 2/115 N.Z.A.O.C.; Sergeant John MARTIN, 2/1004, N.Z.F.A.; Lance-corporal Walter Frederick KENT-JOHNSTON, 4/553; Sapper Leo Gladstone MAHON, 6/3223, Divisional Signal Company; C.S.M. Albert BOVILL, 4/657; Q.M.S. William Ernest WILSON, 4/260. N.Z.E.;

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3296, 16 MAY 1917
Mr J. G. Hyde, Lindis Pass, informs us that his son, George Clarence HYDE, Tarras, who was drawn in the ballot, was accepted by the Government last September for the Flying Corps, and is at present in training.
Word has been received that Lieutenant Edward Darien WARBURTON, of the Flying Corps, previously reported missing, is now a prisoner in Germany. He accompanied Lieutenant Robinson, V.C., to France, and it is presumed that he was captured with him at Karlsruhe.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3298, 30 MAY 1917
Advice has been received that Lieutenant colonel Bernard Cecil FREYBERG, V.C., D.S.O., West Surrey Regiment, has been promoted for services in the field to be brigadier-general commanding the 173rd Infantry Brigade. He is only 27 years of age. He formerly resided in Wellington. He served throughout the present war being a hero at the British landing at Helles, and also at the battle of Ancre.
Word has just come to hand by the mail that Captain William Henry Purvis MCKENZIE, the eldest son of Mr A. McKenzie, Maitland street [Dunedin], has received the Military Cross, on the recommendation of General Chetwode. G.O.C of the Desert Column. One of the men serving under Captain McKenzie received a D.C.M. Captain McKenzie took his degree of M. A. at the Otago University, after which he gained a scholarship which enabled him to proceed to Princeton University (America) where he was studying for the ministry when the war broke out. He at once travelled to England, and joined the Scottish Light Horse, from which body he was selected as commanding officer for the No. 7 [?] Light Car Patrol, Egyptian Expeditionary Force.
Advice has been received by Mr Bishop. S.M., that his son. Lieutenant Alfred Wedderburn BISHOP, of the Hampshire Regiment, has been killed in action in France. Lieutenant Bishop was a barrister and solicitor here.
Word has been received that Dr Hugh BARR, captain in the Royal Army Medical Corps, died of wounds at Salonika on February 21. He was formerly in practice at Alexandra (Otago). He went Home in 1915 and took a commission.
Many friends of Mr Cornelius Mahoney, well known some years ago in teaching circles in Otago, who is now employed in a Native school in the Auckland district, will be pleased to hear of the success of two of his sons in the army. Two boys have made the supreme sacrifice, but Brian and Ernest are still fighting. Brian Gerald MAHONEY transferred from the mounted forces to the infantry, and in September was wounded at Flers. Since his return to the trenches he has been promoted to corporal, sergeant, and ultimately attained a commission in the Imperial army [Royal Munster Fusiliers]. The eldest son (Ernest Andrew MAHONEY) enlisted in the Queen's Bays (2nd Dragoon Guards) as a private, and he also has won his way through the ranks of corporal and sergeant to a lieutenant's commission.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3299, 6 JUNE 1917
Two New Zealanders in the British Army have just received the Military Cross — Lieutenant Charles Gordon KEMP, M.B., R.A.M.C, attached to the Northampton Regiment, and Second Lieutenant Maurice William Campbell SPROTT, Norfolk Regiment. Lieutenant Kemp is the youngest son of Dr W. G. Kemp (one time well known in Wellington). He is an "old boy" of Wanganui College, and at the time war was declared he was in practice at St. Albans, Herts. We are told that he worked "unceasingly for two days under very heavy fire, and succeeded in evacuating a large number of wounded. He displayed great courage and determination throughout the operations." Second Lieutenant M. W. C. Sprott is the elder son of Bishop Sprott, and a graduate of Victoria College, Wellington, also B.A. of Cambridge. At the conclusion of his university course he was appointed assistant master of Victoria College, Jersey. He was commissioned to the 9th Battalion, Norfolk Regiment, in November, 1914. It is on official record that, "during a raid on the enemy's trenches, he carried out the task allotted to him with conspicuous success, and showed great pluck in getting back the wounded under very heavy fire."

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3300, 13 JUNE 1917
Mr Herbert Edwards, of Oamaru, has received advice that his son, Second Lieutenant Edward EDWARDS, 4th Worcester Regiment, was killed in action on May 31. Lieutenant Edwards was born in Oamaru and educated at the Waitaki Boys High School, Canterbury College, and Selwyn College, where he took his B.A. degree. He was curate at Holy Trinity Church, Avonside, Christchurch, and later at Phillipstown. He went to England via Canada and the United States, taking curacies on his way for short periods. Not very long after his arrival in England war broke out, and after being unsuccessful in obtaining a chaplaincy he enlisted as a private in the R.A.M.C., in which capacity he saw service in Mudros and Egypt.
Sir James G. Wilson has received a cablegram from his son, Robert Adams WILSON, who is serving with the Royal Siege Artillery (Imperial Forces) in France, stating that he has been promoted to the rank of major, with charge of a battery. This shows how quickly promotion comes in active service these days, Major Wilson has been only eight months at the front, and in the artillery forces promotion is proverbially slow.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3302, 27 JUNE 1917
Sir James Allen has received advice of the following honours conferred on New Zealanders: Distinguished Service Cross - Flight-lieutenant Thomas Grey CULLING, Remuera, Auckland, of the Royal Naval Air Service; and Military Cross - Second Lieutenant Charles Edwards BLAYNEY, Devonport, of the Royal Flying Corps.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3303, 4 JULY 1917
Information has been received that Flight Lieutenant Thomas Grey CULLING, son of Mr and Mrs Culling, of Victoria avenue, Remuera, who has been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, has been reported missing since June 8. He is 21 years of age, and went to Auckland with his parents from Dunedin 11 years ago. He received his education at King's College, and went to England, where he joined the Aviation Service.
Lieutenant Wynne Dudley RAYMOND, son of Mr I. W. Raymond, formerly of Invercargill, has secured a transfer from the Westmoreland and Cumberland Yeomanry to the 2nd Lancers (Bengal), one of the crack cavalry regiments of India.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3304, 11 JULY 1917
Mr Powell, of Port Chalmers, has received word that his grandson was on board the s.s Otaki when she was attacked and sunk by the German raider Moewe, and that the lad is now interned in Germany. Captain Archibald BISSETT-SMITH [Archibald Bisset SMITH], of the Otaki who was killed in the action with the raider, was the boy's stepfather, and had taken him for a trip on the ill-fated steamer. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archibald_Bisset_Smith - Shortly before World War I, Smith married Welsh-born Edith Clulee (née Powell), whom he had met while working in Port Chalmers, New Zealand. She had a son, Alfred, from a previous marriage. Alfred later took his stepfather's surname. - NZ Births 1901/105 [DOB 13 Dec 1900] CLULEE Alfred Broomfield; Mother Edith Broomfield; Father George Frederick]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3305, 18 JULY 1917
Sub-lieutenant Arthur Nelson FIELD, R.N.V.R., late of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, has been appointed to the staff of the Commander-in-Chief at Portsmouth, Admiral Sir Hedworth Meux. Prior to enlisting, Sub-lieutenant Field was news editor of the Dominion.
News has been received by cable that Captain Percival Clay BRIDGEMAN [Percy Cunningham Allan BRIDGEMAN/Percival Cunningham Allan BRIDGEMAN], eldest son of Mr Frederick Orlando Bridgeman, has been appointed Deputy Director of the Military Aircraft Department. Captain Bridgeman was in England at the outbreak of the war, and volunteered at once, receiving a commission in October, 1914, in the Army Service Corps. After nine months active service in Flanders, and taking part in the battle of Ypres when the Northumbrians, his division, suffered very severe casualties, Captain Bridgeman was sent back to England to instruct recruits in the A.S.C., and subsequently received a staff appointment at the War Office in connection with the Royal Flying Corps.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3307, 1 AUGUST 1917
Among the list of names mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig's despatch of April 9, submitting names deserving of special mention, occurs that of Second Lieutenant (now Major) Robert Adams WILSON, R.G.A., Imperial Army.
A cable message received in Auckland by Mr Arthur R. Brett from the Admiralty announces that Sub-lieutenant Leslie Henry BRETT was killed in a flying accident on the 22nd inst. Sub-lieutenant Brett was 23 years of age. He was educated at King's College, and after completing his course there joined the staff of the Auckland Star. On the outbreak of war he responded to the first call for volunteers, and was sent with the Expeditionary Force which captured Samoa. Having completed a term of service there, he returned to Auckland, and received his discharge. Being an experienced yachtsman and expert motorist, he desired to enter the British Naval Flying Corps, and proceeded to England, where he enlisted in the Navy, with the rank of sub-lieutenant. Having completed his course at the Flying School, he was sent on active service in the Mediterranean, and while there was engaged in several aerial combats, in which his machine was hit, but he sustained no personal injury. On one occasion his machine came down in the sea, but he was not seriously hurt. Another machine returning damaged from the same engagement fell in a swamp, and the observer was killed. The brief Admiralty cable message indicates that Sub-lieutenant Brett was killed in an accident when flying, but there are no further particulars. Two brothers of the deceased are serving with the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces — one left with the Nineteenth Contingent, and another is in camp at Trentham.
Letters received by his parents from Scotland last week show that Mr John Williams McLAREN, a young Dunedin engineer, has been granted a commission, as first lieutenant in the Royal Engineers. On May 4, he went across the Channel to France to supervise the building of facilities to deal with transport work, such as the unloading of war material — work similar to that which he was performing at a naval base in England.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3308, 8 AUGUST 1917
A cable message received from Sir James Mills states that his son, Lieutenant Henry James Fosbery MILLS, is a prisoner of war at Karlsruhe.[Lieutenant King's Royal Rifle Corps]
Advice has been received that Captain Maxwell RAMSAY, R.A.M.C. (2nd London), son of Mrs Keith Ramsay, of Dunedin, has been mentioned in despatches by Sir Douglas Haig.
Temporary commissions in the Imperial Army have been granted to: Sergeant George HOOD 5/270a, N.Z.A.S.C. [4th Reserve Regiment of Cavalry]; Trooper Matthew Roland FARRER, 13/1023, A.M.R. [3rd Reserve Regiment Cavalry ]; William Wellesley James CALTHROP 4/602 [Royal Field Artillery] and Private John Willoughby Hadfield MARSHALL, 10/3809, Wellington Regiment [York and Lancaster Regiment], who have completed their training in the O.T.C. They have been discharged from the N.Z.E.F.
Nominations in May for Imperial commissions from the N.Z.E.F.: Sergeant Arthur PARRISH, A.M.R.. 13/2007; Sergeant William Meirion JONES, N.Z.E., 4/75a; Private Basil Whithorne HOLMAN, N.Z.A.S.C., 9/476; Sergeant Roy Jocelyn GRAINGER, N.Z. Tunnelling Co., 5/393; Sergeant Charles ROSSITER, Auckland Regiment, 12/2828.

> OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3312, 5 SEPTEMBER 1917
The following pupils at the New Zealand Flying School at Kohimarama have passed for the Royal Aero Club's aviators' certificates: Richard RUSSELL (Invercargill), Weston James BARBER (Te Horo, Wellington), Stanley Robert AUSTIN (Foxton). Forty-one pupils of the school have now passed the tests.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3313, 12 SEPTEMBER 1917
The military authorities have been advised that Captain Bernard Charles TENNENT, R A.M.C., a New Zealander, has been awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in action. The address of his next-of-kin is unknown here.
Mr W. T. Jennings, M.P., has received information by cable that his son, Lieutenant Alfred George JENNINGS, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, was seriously wounded on August 28, and is now in the Rouen hospital. Lieutenant Jennings is the third son of the member for Taumarunui. He went away with the Main Expeditionary Force, and after serving in Gallipoli and France, obtained a commission. He won the Military Cross about two months ago. Mr Jennings has lost two sons in the war.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3315, 26 SEPTEMBER 1917
Alexander Moncrieff FINLAYSON [Alexander Manson Moncrieff FINLAYSON] was born at the manse, Waitati, on February 10, 1884. He was educated at the public school up to the sixth standard, then for two years at the District High School, Port Chalmers, where he won a Senior Education Board Scholarship, and attended the Waitaki Boys' High School for three years. At the end of this term he entered the Otago University with a Junior University Scholarship. He graduated from the University of New Zealand, gaining his B.Sc. in 1906, the Senior Scholarship in Geology in the same year, and his M.Sc, with first-class double honours in geology and electricity, in 1907. He was for five years at the Otago University and School of Mines, gaining the Black Prize in chemistry in 1903, the Ulrich Memorial Medal in mineralogy and petrography in 1906, and the Associateship of the Otago School of Mines in 1907. At the School of Mines, where he worked with Professor's Marshall and Park, he carried out several researches in economic geology, comprising studies of the scheelite deposits of Macraes and Glenorchy, of the gold veins of Otago, and of the Reefton goldfield. During three field seasons he was engaged on the New Zealand Geological Survey under Dr. J. M. Bell, in the Ross and Mikonui districts of Westland, the Cromwell and Kawarau districts of Central Otago, and the Parapara and Collingwood districts of Nelson. In November, 1907, he went to the Auckland Islands as one of the geologists on the sub-Antarctic expedition of the Hinemoa. In 1908 Mr Finiayson was awarded the 1851 Exhibition Scholarship for a thesis on the geology of the Otago gold veins, and proceeded to London, where he was for two years engaged in the ecological laboratories of the Imperial College of Science end Technology (Royal School of Mines), under the direction of Professor W. W. Watts, president of the Geological Society of London. During his tenure of the scholarship he carried out several investigations on the application of geology to mining. His first work, which has been published by the Geological Society, was a research on the occurrence and origin of New Zealand nephrite (greenstone) based on previous field work in New Zealand. This paper has attracted considerable notice from both English and German geologists. In the winter of 1903-1909 he commenced a study of the lead and zinc ores of Great Britain — a work which has since been completed and published in two papers in the Geological Society's journal. In connection with this work, the council of the society awarded him the Daniel Pigeon Fund prize in 1909. In the same year he completed a research bearing on the cause and extent of ore-shoots on the Thames and Waihi goldfields. In the summer of 1909 he proceeded to Huelva, Spain, where he was engaged for three months in a detailed geological examination of the famous copper mines of Rio Tinto, and adjoining districts. The results of this work were submitted, in June, 1910, to the University of London, and gained him the degree of Doctor of Science. The work received warm commendation for its practical value from Professor W. A. Carlyle, formerly general manager to the Rio Tinto Company, and it has been published in Economic Geology, a journal issued from Yale University (New Haven, U.S.A.) It is of interest to note that this is the first occasion on which the University of London has awarded its doctorate for a research in mining geology. Dr Finlayson has been elected a fellow of the Geological Society of London, and an Associate of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, and he has been a contributor to the Mining Journal, the Mining Magazine (London), and the Mining and Scientific Press (San Francisco). In 1910 Dr Finlayson received an appointment as petroleum geologist on the Burma oilfields. In this work he was occupied when the war broke out in 1914. As soon as he could get relieved from his engagement he went to England and obtained a lieutenant's commission, and was attached to the South Lancashire Regiment. For more than a year he was kept with the Reserve, training recruits and receiving special training in officer's work. After getting to the front he was twice wounded prior to the final wounds to which, as reported, he succumbed on July 3, at the age of 33 years.
Advice has been received that Mr Frank George MASSEY, son of the Prime Minister, who left New Zealand with the rank of lieutenant in the Rifle Brigade, has been transferred on promotion to the 11th Lancashire Guards, with the rank of major.
Mrs H. Eccles, at present residing in Auckland, has received advice of the death in action of her husband, Captain Horace Dorset ECCLES on August 26. Dr Eccles was born in England, and entered Guy's Hospital, London, where he passed his medical examination, and gained his degree. He came to New Zealand in 1900, and went to Manganui. On the outbreak of war he offered his services to the New Zealand Medical Corps, but there being then no vacancy, he went to England and enlisted there. He was immediately appointed medical instructor at one of the R.A.M.C. camps, and within a month of enlisting he was in the firing line in France. On July 25 he was promoted and mentioned in despatches, being transferred from the Irish Rifles to the Artists' Rifles.
A message received in Christchurch on Wednesday stated that Lieutenant-colonel Arthur BLEWITT, of the 60th Rifles, had been killed in France. He was well known in the North Canterbury district, and has had a distinguished career. He was about 55 years of age and was educated at Eton. He was one of "Kitchener's men" in Egvpt, and was Governor of Fashoda and afterwards Governor of Khartoum province. He then rejoined his regiment in India with the rank of major. While on leave in 1904 he paid a visit to New Zealand, and was so favourably impressed with this country that he sent in his papers and decided to stay here, purchasing the Terako station in the Amuri district. On the outbreak of hostilities he left for England and offered his services to the War Office.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3316, 3 OCTOBER 1917
Private advice has been received from London by Mrs Bidwell, of [Bell Road] Remuera, that her son (Captain C. N. Bidwell) lost his life at the sinking of a transport in the English Channel in July. Captain Bidwell was chief officer of the vessel at the time. His boat, with 11 other men in it, got clear of the ship, but was never seen afterwards. The occupants of the other boats were picked up. [also NEW ZEALAND HERALD, VOLUME LIV, ISSUE 16649, 20 SEPTEMBER 1917] [No trace]
Information received by Mr J. H. Skinner (of Auckland) states that his son (Second Lieutenant Arthur Hurst SKINNER, Royal Flying Corps) has been missing since September 16. Lieutenant Skinner left New Zealand with the Main Body, and saw service on the peninsula. He gained his commission in the Aviation Corps in May last.
Accompanying a draft of returned soldiers which arrived in Auckland on the 25th was Captain Arthur William BROCKS, who has come to New Zealand to take up a staff appointment as director of physical and bayonet training to the New Zealand forces. Captain Brocks holds a commission in the Worcestershire Regiment. He has seen considerable active service, and was through the whole Gallipoli campaign, in the course of which he was wounded. He was in Egypt for some time before being in France. After seeing a good deal of service he sustained a compound fracture of the arm. For conspicuous work on Gallipoli and in France he was awarded the Military Cross
Writing from Offz, Gefanganenlager, Sehwarmstedt, Hanover, on June 16, to his mother, Mrs Bloomfield, of Gisborne, Flight commander William Swanson Read BLOOMFIELD, Royal Flying Corps, who is a prisoner of war in Germany, states: "Since I last wrote I have been moved to no less than three camps. . . (censored) . . . I have quite a lot of freedom, though. Every day we wander out for walks, and go bathing in a small creek some two miles from the camp. This, as you may guess, helps considerably to lighten the burden of captivity. Yesterday I received a personal letter from Sir Thos. Mackenzie, High Commissioner for New Zealand. He has sent me a safety razor and toilet outfit, together with some shirts, socks, etc., which, I might add, I'm very much in need of at the moment. He is also sending three food parcels fortnightly, all of which will be paid for by the New Zealand Prisoner of War Aid Society. I am also receiving food parcels from the British Red Cross and Royal Flying Corps, so I am not doing badly. My kit, with all my clothes, should arrive any moment now. You need not bother or worry about anything at all, because, as I mentioned before, I am quite all right.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3317, 10 OCTOBER 1917
A cable message from the High Commissioner gives the names of New Zealanders who had honours conferred upon them as men who are not members of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. At present the status of the recipients and the names of next-of-kin are not known at the Base Records: Distinguished Service Order and Military Medal - Captain Arthur COXINGHAM, R.F.C. Military Medal - Captain Clive Franklyn COLLETT, R.F.C; Captain Cecil Fred George HUMPHRIES, Highland Light Infantry; Second Lieutenant James Moir PATERSON, R.F.A.; Second Lieutenant Oscar Eugene GALLIE R.F.A.; Second Lieutenant James OLIPHANT, Scots Borderers; Second Lieutenant Rowland David Underwood TODD, Royal Garrison Artillery.
Mrs Freyberg, of Wellington, has received official information that her son, Brigadier general Bernard Cecil FREYBERG, V.C., D.S.O., was wounded on September 24 by gunshot in the chest and left thigh, and that the wound is of a severe nature. On Tuesday, 2nd inst., a cable message was received by Mrs Freyberg from her son Cuthbert Freyberg, which states that Brigadier-general Freyberg is in a London military hospital, and is doing well.
Details have been received by Mr and Mrs Joseph Tanner, of Remuera, of the circumstances connected with the death of their eldest son, Samuel TANNER, who was fourth engineer on the City of Perth when that vessel was torpedoed near Land's End. A letter has just been received from Mr Colin Forbes, third engineer, stating that the ship was struck in the engine room at 8.11 p.m. on June 11. He adds: — "As I belong to Bluff, Southland, and was third engineer on the City of Perth, it was bit natural your son and I hit it all right. We had made a compact if we got through to stick together, but it was willed otherwise. The poor boy never had a chance for his life. He had just taken over the watch, and by information from the greaser who was attending the steering engine, Sam had just gone to draw some water for one of the men, when the torpedo struck the ship practically where he stood. By the time I got to the engine room, which I estimate at about six seconds,the water was knee deep on the platform, and I could do nothing. Not one of the men on the watch below escaped. The torpedo must have blown in the side of the ship, and the boilers exploding at the same time, completed the foul work. A more manly and straightforward boy I have never met than Sam." Deceased was born at Tauranga in 1894. He left New Zealand on transport duty last November, and upon reaching London joined as fourth engineer in the transport, and went in that vessel to Egypt. It was on the return voyage that the vessel was torpedoed near Land's End. [Is this the Colin FORBES born 1884 Echuca, Australia in the Merchant Navy?]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3318, 17 OCTOBER 1917
Sir James Wilson has received a cablegram stating that Major Robert Adams WILSON was slightly wounded in the last fight, but expects to return to the front in a few days.
Second Lieutenant Oscar Eugene GALLIE (a son of Mr John Gallie of Stoke street, Wellington), who has just been awarded the Military Cross, is a native of Dunedin. He is 26 years of ago, and saw service in Samoa for eight months from August, 1914, being the first to join from the Wairarapa. He then went to England, and obtained a commission in the Royal Field Artillery. About two months the Military Cross was awarded to his younger brother, Lieutenant Victor James GALLIE, who is in a different division of the Royal Field Artillery. Both young officers are nephews of Major A. R. Hislop, of Wellington.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3320, 31 OCTOBER 1917
A private cable message received in Wellington announces the escape from a German prison of Lieutenant Roy James FITZGERALD, M.C., of the Gloucester Regiment. Lieutenant Fitzgerald, who is a Wellington boy (son of the late Mr W. C Fitzgerald, chemist, and grandson of Mrs W. James, of Wellington), was wounded in the head five months ago, and made a prisoner. Sister Eileen Fitzgerald, of Brockenburst Hospital, is his sister, and it is from her that Wellington relatives and friends have heard of his escape.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3322, 14 NOVEMBER 1917
Shortly after the outbreak of war two well known South Dunedin young men — Robert AITKEN and Hugh BROWN — left for England to enlist. They had entered into partnership and purchased a farm north of Auckland. When the war commenced Brown enlisted with the New Zealand Forces, but was turned down, and Aitken then agreed to go to England with his mate, and they sold their farm. They joined up with the London Scottish, and after two weeks training went to the front in France, and were soon in the thick of the fighting. Brown was rendered unconscious by the concussion of a shell, was taken prisoner, and is now in Germany. Sergeant Aitken, however, carried on, received a bayonet wound in the leg, and gunshot and shrapnel wounds in the body, and was finally discharged from the Imperial Forces. He has just returned to Dunedin after an absence of over two years, and brings with him the D.C.M. and the first class Military Medal, the latter honour carrying with it a small annuity. Aitken was engaged in some fierce hand to hand fighting, but his dominant feeling now that he looks back on his experiences is how any man could stand up to the hardships of a winter in the trenches — this apart altogether from the fighting — and live. He relates a vivid story of their gallant officers "bucketing" them back from the front lines, using their canes on the men to urge them forward when, exhausted, they desired nothing more than to lie down in the slush and mud and sleep — and then probably death. Exhausted to the last degree, the men reached an empty cow byre, in the dark, and fell down and slept as they were, some of them not awakening for 36 hours after. Asked how it felt, to meet the Germans hand to hand, he hesitated, and then remarked that they had "imposed their will" on the Germans and that they went into the battle buoyed up with the knowledge that a Britisher was equal to several Germans. The London Scottish had a fighting padre with them and on one occasion when the Germans were surging up to the trenches the minister of peace performed deeds of daring, urging the men to "stick it," rushing backwards and forwards to the ammunition dump, and with feverish haste handing up the bombs to carry death to the attackers. Some of tha atrocities perpetrated by the Germans as related by Sergeant Aitken verify the very worst reports which have come to these shores. He says that on one occasion a demented nun made her way into their trenches from the German occupied territory, and that one of the soldiers was detailed to take her back to safety in the rear. The soldier had gone some way when he stopped to light a cigarette, placing his bayonet beside him. In a moment the nun seized it and throw herself on the point; dying instantly. Both Aitken and Brown played in the Southern Football Club Juniors. Brown's brother (W. Brown, the well-known Otago representative and one-time captain of the Southern) is at the front with the New Zealanders.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3323, 21 NOVEMBER 1917
The Base Records Office has received advice that the Military Medal has been awarded to Corporal Henry William MICHAEL, a New Zealander attached to the 19th Battalion of the London Regiment.
Mr E. H. Sanders, of Takapuna (Auckland), father of the late Lieutenant-commander William Edward SANDERS, V.C., has received the following communication from the Admiralty, dated August 17: — “Sir, In confirmation of the Admiralty telegram, I am commanded by My Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to inform you that a telegram has been received stating that your son, Lieutenant-commander William E. Sanders V.C., R.N.R., was killed on the 14th inst., as the result of the vessel in which he was serving being blown up. My Lords deeply deplore the death of this gallant officer, whose services against enemy submarines have been of such value to the Empire, and they desire me to assure you of their profound sympathy in the loss you have sustained. Since the award of the Victoria Cross to your son in the Gazette of June 22 last, in recognition of his conspicuous gallantry, consummate coolness, and skill while in command of one of his Majesty's ships in action, the King had also approved his appointment to be a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order, in recognition of his services in action with an enemy submarine on June 12. This award has not yet been gazetted, but an announcement will be made shortly. Your son had not been decorated with either the V.C., or the insignia of the D.S.O. at the time of his death. It is customary in such cases, if the deceased officer's next-of-kin so desires, for the V.C. to be personally presented by the King to the next-of-kin, and in the case of other distinctions, for the insignia to bo presented by a naval commander-in-chief. As you live in New Zealand, it will not be possible for this procedure to be followed, but arrangements will be made for the presentation to you of the V.C. and the badge of the D.S.O., through the Governor-general of New Zealand. I am,'etc. (Signed) Charles Walker (for secretary)."

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3325, 5 DECEMBER 1917
A long list of awards for gallantry and distinguished service in the field, announced in the London Gazette of September 26, includes the name of Second Lieutenant Keith Rodney PARK, R.F.A. and R.F.C., to whom the Military Cross was awarded. Lieutenant Park, who is a son of Professor Park, of the University of Otago, left New Zealand as a member of the Artillery service in the Expeditionary Force, and participated in the fighting at Gallipoli, where he secured a transfer, with a commission, to the Royal Field Artillery. Subsequently he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps.
Dr Allan George REID, M.C., formerly of Milton, has relinquished his commission after a year's service with the R.A.M.C. Dr Reid, who is a son of Mr James Reid, formerly rector of the Tokomairiro High School, was awarded the Military Cross for service in the field with the R.N. Division at the battle of the Ancre. He received his decoration from the King at Buckingham Palace this week. Dr Reid has now returned to his practice in East London.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3326, 12 DECEMBER 1917
The award of a Military Cross to Lieutenant William Wallace COOK, New Zealand Forces and Royal Flying Corps, was officially announced on October 12. The award was made in recognition of conspicuous gallantry and skill in an attack on a Zeppelin. Lieutenant Cook ascended from his station during strong wind, thick mist, and low clouds, and showed great determination, eventually giving up the attack when 60 miles out to sea. His return journey was hazardous, but with great skill he eventually effected a landing in a field within a quarter of a mile of the coast, having been in the air for five hours and a-half.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3327, 19 DECEMBER 1917
A realistic account of the new poison gas being employed by the Germans is given by Captain Oscar Eugene GALLIE, a New Zealand officer serving in the artillery on the western front. Writing to his brother Mr C. L. Gallie of Newtown, on August 27, he states: "I suppose you have read about this particular front — of the lively artillery actions, of the heavy guns which the Boche has, of the shifting terrain, and so on; but worst of all is his new mustard gas. Phosgene and lachrymatory are sweet and pure compared to it...

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3329, 2 JANUARY 1918
Lieutenant Robert Leslie GARDEN has been granted a commission in the Indian Army, and has been struck off the strength of the N.Z.E.F.
We reported recently that Second Lieutenant Keith Rodney PARK, R.F.A., R.F.C, son of Professor Park, of Otago University, had been awarded the Military Cross. The official announcement of this was contained in the London Gazette of September 26 last. The London Gazette of October 27 last announced that an additional award that of a bar to the Military Cross had been conferred upon him. Rapid promotion has accompanied this recognition of his bravery, for an appointment to a captaincy in the Royal Flying Corps was shortly followed by his promotion to be a flight commander. A New Zealand soldier, writing to Flight commander Park's father, describes him as now one of our star airmen.
Letters received by the last mail from Major Robert Adams WILSON, son of Sir James Wilson, Bulls, mention that on the 30th September he was out when shells were falling about, and suddenly found himself on his back; two fragments of shell had struck his steel helmet and driven it in on his head, making a scalp wound. He says that these helmets undoubtedly save thousands of lives. He was sent to the base hospital, and after nine days rest rejoined his battery, which has now been increased by the addition of two more heavy guns. He now commands six guns, 200 men, and seven officers — a good record for a year's service in the Imperial army [Royal Garrison Artillery/Royal Field Artillery].
Mr James Cockburn, of Clinton, has received advice that his son George COCKBURN has obtained a commission. He enlisted with the Fijian Contingent from Suva, and has seen eighteen months service in France. He was gassed in one engagement, and sent to hospital, but soon recovered, and returned to the front.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3330, 9 JANUARY 1918
Some particulars of the escape of Lieutenant Roy James FITZGERALD [FITZ GERALD], of the Gloucestershire Regiment, from a German internment camp are contained in a letter written by Sergeant Gerald Henry Patterson FITZGERALD, of the 28th New Zealand Reinforcements (infantry), from England to his wife in Wellington. He was at Sling Camp when he was informed that he had four days leave to go to London to meet his escaped brother. He went, and a family gathering resulted, consisting of Lieutenant Roy Fitzgerald, Captain Maurice Edward William FITZGERALD, R.F.E., Lieutenant J. Fitzgerald, now engaged in tank work, Lieutenant Harold Taylor, R.E., Lieutenant Eric Taylor, from Codford Camp, and Nurse Eileen Maude FITZGERALD, from Brockenhurst Hospital. Lieutenant Roy Fitzgerald joined the army at the beginning of the war and was awarded the M.C. for gallantry at the battle of the Somme. While wounded and unconscious in the Messines engagement he was taken prisoner. While prisoners, he and another officer went to get water from a place a few yards from their enclosure, pretending to be two "Tommies," who were their orderlies in camp. Once outside, they made a bolt for it while the sentry's back was turned, and evidently the German was too flurried to fire until they had got too far. Still in their uniforms they travelled, but only by night, having to hide in the daytime, a distance of 120 miles, which they covered in seven days. They were not challenged until they were crossing the frontier, where they were fired at by a Dutch sentry. Their only food consisted of what they took away from camp, plus apples gathered on the way. Their journey included swimming the river Ems. Their treatment in Germany was not as severe as we have been led to believe; provided they could bottle up their feelings at the overbearing manner of the German officers." Lieutenant Fitzgerald's experience included 27 days in "clink" for a previous attempt to escape.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3331, 16 JANUARY 1918
News has been received by cable that Lieutenant-colonel Redmond Barry NEILL, third son of Mr P. C. Neill, of this city, is included in the list of recipients of New Year honours, having been awarded the D.S.O. Colonel Neill had retired from the Imperial Army, with the rank of captain, some time before the outbreak of the war, having acquired a sheep station in Canterbury. On the declaration of war Colonel Neill immediately offered his services to the War Office, which promptly accepted them, and he accompanied the first New Zealand War Contingent to Samoa as adjutant. Being recalled to New Zealand, he was given command of the Fourth Reinforcements, which he took to Egypt. He was ordered to England to rejoin his old regiment, the Royal Irish Fusiliers, with which he had served in the Boer war, and for 11 years in India. Subsequently Colonel Neill, whilst in command of the West Yorks, was severely wounded in action with them on the Somme, and was mentioned in despatches. On recovery from his wounds he was given the command of the Second Battalion of the Royal Munsters.
Word has been received by his parents that Captain Robert Francis MITCHELL has been awarded the Military Cross. Captain "Bob" Mitchell is the well-known athletic champion. He left New Zealand as a lieutenant in the 5th Mounted Rifles, with the Main Body. He was wounded on Gallipoli, and returned to New Zealand for eight months rest, as he was suffering also from shell shock. He sailed for France in July, 1916. From there he was sent to England as a cavalry instructor, attached to the King and Queen's Hussars. He again left for France in the middle of April, 1917, and has been through all the actions with the New Zealanders since he arrived there. He was formerly employed by the Post and Telegraph Department as a telegraphist, and was a well-known figure in Dunedin sporting circles.
Information has been received by Mr and Mrs Wesley Spragg, of Mount Eden, Auckland, that their only son Flight-lieutenant Wesley Neal SPRAGG, was killed in action in Egypt on January 1. Deceased left Auckland for London on October 5, 1915, and there joined the Royal Flying Corps, being appointed a flight-lieutenant. Later he was employed as aeroplane-machine-gun instructor, in which he was recognised as an expert. The cable received furnishes no details as to the sad occurrence. This adds one more to the roll of King's College, Remuera, of old pupils who have given their lives for the Empire. Lieutenant Spragg, prior to the war, was a partner in the firm of Haycock and Spragg, motor engineers, of Auckland.
The announcement was recently made by the Base Records Office that the Military Cross had been awarded Captain Robert BIFFAULT who was unknown to the authorities. This is evidently the Auckland surgeon who went to England in May, 1915 and received a commission in the Royal Army Medical Corps. He served in Gallipoli until the end of that campaign, and during the past 18 months has been in France.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3332, 23 JANUARY 1918
Lieutenant Thomas Fosberry HANDYSIDE (Royal Dublin Fusiliers), killed in action, was the son of Mr J Handyside, of Napier and was married to a daughter of Mr Ruddock, a very old and respected resident of Napier. He was very well known in Wellington, and was a man of remarkable physique.
Lieutenant Hubert Philip SOLOMON, R.F.C., who was killed in action on the 19th October, was born in Dunedin, and educated at Wellington College. He was well known throughout the dominion as a commercial traveller, and before enlisting in the N.Z.E.F. in 1915 had an indent agency in Christchurch. He saw service in Egypt, and going to England about October, 1916, got his commission in the R.F.C. Two months later he went to France as a pilot, and remained there until April of this year, when he was appointed instructor in night flying in England. He was killed on the night of the 19th of October while attacking a Zeppelin raiding the east of England, and was buried with military honours at Gainsborough. He has a brother, a sergeant in the Canadian Expeditionary Force. [John Victor SOLOMON or Cyril Asher SOLOMON - not confirmed.]
Captain Noel John Hay GAVIN, R.A.M.C., M.C., and bar (Wellington), who died in France on the first of November, met his death as the result of an accident. It is understood that on the night of November 1, while riding up to the trenches along a wooden road, his horse took fright, bolted, slipped and fell, throwing Captain Gavin on to his head and fracturing his skull. He died very shortly after reaching No. 21 Casualty Clearing Station, and he was buried next day in the local cemetery. Captain Gavin was the fourth son of the late Mr J. C. Gavin and Mrs Gavin, of Wellington.
Captain Arthur Thomas ABRAHAM, M.C., Manchester Regiment, the eldest son of the late Rev. T. P. Abraham, Rector of Risby, Suffolk, was killed in action on October 22, at the age of 32. At one time Captain Abraham was farming in New Zealand, and he left the dominion to take up land in Vagros Island, B.C. On the declaration of war he left his farm and joined the Canadian infantry as a private, so that he saw service very early in 1915. At the first battle of Ypres he was badly gassed. Recovering, he returned to the front, remaining there until he was commissioned to the 3rd Manchester Regiment. In June of this year he was awarded the Military Cross. Captain Abraham married Miss Ruth Robinson, daughter of M. Robinson, C.M.G., late commanding officer of the Cape Mounted Police, South Africa.
Lieutenant Douglas John ALDRIDGE, R.M.L.I., killed in action early in November, at the age of 33, was at one time engaged in farming in New Zealand, but went to the Malay States in connection with rubber planting. He was in Malay when war was declared. Throwing up his work there, he returned to England, and obtained a commission in the R.N. Division. Lieutenant Aldridge was in Gallipoli during most of the fighting.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XLIII, ISSUE 9876, 23 JANUARY 1918
Lieutenant Philip Roderick McRae HANNA, Royal Field Artillery, son of Mr T. H. Hanna, of Whakapirau, Auckland, who was wounded in the shoulder on October 2nd last, has been granted six months leave, and is expected to visit Auckland shortly. Lieutenant Hanna, who was one of the first Main Body men to enlist in Auckland, was on the Auckland staff of tho National Bank. He left as a sapper in the Divisional Signal Company, and after going through the Gallipoli campaign, obtained a commission in the Royal Field Artillery.
Advice has been received of the death of Second Lieutenant Frederick James LIVINGSTONE, of the Royal Flying Corps in an aeroplane accident at Gainsborough, England, on January 12th. Lieutenant Livingstone, who was about 24 years of age, was educated at the Boys High School, Christchurch, and left for England five years ago, where he entered the Kelham Theological College. At the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Royal Medical Corps, with which he saw service in Egypt. Subsequently he was transferred to the Royal Flying Corps, obtaining his commission towards the end of last year.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3334, 6 FEBRUARY 1918
Temporary-captain Frank SIMON, who fell in action on January 10, was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs T. Simon, formerly of Invercargill, but now of Timaru. Temporary captain Simon was born in Dunedin 27 years ago. He attended the Invercargill Middle and Southland Boys High Schools, and proceeded to the Otago University and on to Trinity College, Dublin, where he was studying medicine and law at the outbreak of the war. At Trinity College he won the gold medal for international law. Mr Simon enlisted at the start, and obtained a commission in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. For one year he was engaged in training troops at Curragh Camp. Since then he has been in France. Some eight months ago he was transferred from the Imperial army to the New Zealand forces, and was attached to the Eighth (Southland) Regiment. Temporary captain Simon leaves a young widow resident in London. His younger brother (Horace SIMON), who went from New Zealand with the Main Body, recently joined the Royal Naval Aerial Service.
Captain Oscar Eugene GALLIE, D.S.O., M.C. (killed in action in December), was the fourth son of Mr and Mrs J Gallie of Wellington, and was 28 years of age. He was born in Dunedin but educated at Wellington, and in 1907 was in the employ of the Masterton branch of Dalgety and Co., where he was well known in connection with various branches of sport. He went to Samoa with D Battery, and after being there eight months returned to New Zealand. Having obtained his discharge, he proceeded to England and obtained a commission in the R.F.A. He took part in all the battles of 1916-17, and was awarded the Military Cross, a month later earning the distinction of D.S.O. He gained his captains rank on October 31. His death removes a most promising officer. Two brothers are still at the front — Captain Victor James GALLIE, M.C., Royal Field Artillery, and Private C. S. Gallie, Auckland Infantry.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3335, 13 FEBRUARY 1918
News has been received by a recent mail that Captain Philip Randal WOODHOUSE, M.C., N.Z.M.C has been awarded a bar to his Military Cross for services rendered at the front in France. Captain Woodhouse, who joined the R.A.M.C at the beginning of the war, and has been attached for the last two years to the 1st Battalion, Irish Guards, has been three times mentioned in despatches and thrice wounded.
Private advice has been received in Ashburton that Corporal Donald Victor THOMAS, youngest son of Mrs David Thomas, Carter's terrace, Tinwald, has been selected for a commission in the Indian army. Corporal Thomas enlisted on attaining the age of 20 years, and left with the Twenty-ninth Reinforcements. On arriving in France he was detailed to go through a special course of bombing. Corporal Thomas was educated at the Ashburton High School and Christ's College, representing the latter at swimming, cricket, and football.
The D.C.M. has been awarded to a New Zealander serving in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers — No. 18999, Sergeant Walter Alexander THOMAS.
Lieutenant Oliver WAKEFIELD, of the Household Battalion, who was killed in action on October 12, was a son of Mr E. Wakefield (formerly a member of Parliament in New Zealand and nephew of Edward Gibbon Wakefield). Lieutenant Wakefield was killed in the attack near Poelcapelle. After an awful night the battalion went over the top, and were advancing with very little opposition. Lieutenant Wakefield and Captain Cazalet were discussing the situation and getting the men together when a heavy German shell came over. Lieutenant Wakefield remarked: "It's got me," and then fell over, and never regained consciousness, his steel helmet having been pierced and his head crushed. His battalion commander, writing to Mr Wakefield, says "Your son was one of the bravest men I ever met, and a great example to others. We feel his loss enormously, and his men were devoted to him. His company commander says "It was indeed a privilege for me to have in my company one who, in every respect, was the personification of the highest type of English gentleman. As young as I am, I was able to appreciate his exceedingly great unselfishness, combined with a tremendous sense of humour. His adjutant says He was quite the straightest person I have ever met, utterly fearless, and loved by officers and men alike. Mr Wakefield has also received a letter of sympathy from the King and Queen. Lieutenant Wakefield was born in Wellington, and received his first education at Wellington College. He served in the Boer war with the C.I.V., and was very badly wounded. Returning to civil life, he studied for the Church, and before the war was for three years one of the Archbishop of Canterbury's commissaries in Western Canada. When the war broke out he offered his services as a soldier, and received his commission in the 7th Hussars, from which he was transferred to the Life Guards; and later to the Household Battalion, which lost 600 men in the battle of Arras, in which Lieutenant Wakefield was wounded.
The death took place on October 16, on service of Lieutenant Malcolm Bartlett BEATTIE, Royal Berks Regiment, son of Mr Cyril R. Beattie, of Palmerston North, and nephew of Mrs George Hines. Lieutenant Beattie, who was 21 years of age, was educated at Huntley School, Marton, and Wanganui, and he came to England to take his medical course at St. George's Hospital. He was commissioned to the Royal Berks last March, and in August he received the Belgian honour of Chevalier de l'Ordre du Couronne. During his career at Wanganui Lieutenant Beattie was a keen cricketer and footballer.
Lieutenant Cyril Robert NICHOLS, East Surrey Regiment (Oamaru), who had been attached to a trench mortar battery for a long while, was hurt on October 8. His dug-out was shelled, and collapsed, and he sustained injury to his ankle. Lieutenant Nichols is in London, and is able to be out now.
Captain Philip Randal WOODHOUSE, M.C., R.A.M.C. (Dunedin and Wellington), has been wounded while on duty, with the Irish Guards, to which he became attached last March. Captain Woodhouse has seen considerable war service, and was mentioned in Sir D. Haig's despatches of June, 1916. In the early days of the war he served with a field ambulance.
Captain Audley Charles Hyde MILLAR, M.C., of the Yorkshire Regiment, is reported killed. He arrived in England to offer his services in July, 1915, and was awarded, the Military Cross in June last.
Miss Ella Kate COOKE, an Auckland nurse, who has, been on military duty with the Q.A.I.M.N.S. for two years and a half, is reported to have been instantaneously killed at Alexandria, Egypt, while on active service. Miss Cooke was the youngest daughter of the late Henry Cooke, of Auckland, and was on the staff of the Napier Hospital before leaving for the war. She served for some time in France before going to Egypt.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3336, 20 FEBRUARY 1918
Cabled advice, dated February 2, has been received by Base Records that 18959 Sergeant Walter Alexander THOMAS, a New Zealander serving with the Welsh Fusiliers, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. His nearest relative is Mrs A. Thomas, 41 Harrison street, Wanganui.
Mr Eric Hilton HALLEY has been granted a commission, and will proceed to England shortly as draft conducting officer. Lieutenant Halley has been serving the Empire since August, 1914, having been through both the German South-west and the East African campaigns with the S.A.F.A. Lieutenant Halley is a grandson of the late Mr J. A. Matthews, Mornington.
Lieutenant Sidney V. Montgomery, in writing to the headmaster of the Albany Street School from Dar-es-salaam (East Africa) says that he can quite realise that there are few at the old school who will remember the writer, "but in these days, when the Empire's forces are concentrating from all ends of the earth, the old school where we were taught that all the ends we should aim at were 'our country's, our God's, and truth's' is still remembered. Probably in your own town some controversy has raged [against] the advisability of teaching children so much about the history of the Old Land and so little about their own birthplace. To-day I can fully appreciate Mr M'Millan's reading of 'Westward Ho!' Mr Spence's insistence on our knowing precisely why Oliver Cromwell harmed Charles, and Mr Thompson's lucid explanations of our Imperial policy that led US against Russia at Alma, Balaclava, and Sebastopol". The writer states that he was enjoying wonderful health. Fever had been a terrible scourge in the British ranks, no fewer than 30,000 men having been invalided from this cause alone in 12 months. When he wrote they were preparing the final assault against the Germans, and "there is no doubt," he added, "that before three months are over another dominion will be added to our possessions." [Probably Sydney Vatcher MONTGOMERY born 1884 Dunedin to James and Marion Montgomery] [PRESS, VOLUME LVII, ISSUE 17076, 22 FEBRUARY 1921 The death occurred at Dar-es-Salaam recently of Mr Sidney Montgomery, aged 30 years. Mr Montgomery was an old Dunedin boy, who went to South Africa in 1903. He held some important positions in the mining world, but will be best remembered for being three times gold medallist in the Johannesburg Eisteddfod. He was one of the finest elocutionists in the country. He fought as a lieutenant in the rebellion. Mr Montgomery was extremely popular as a manager of the African Theatres Trust, Ltd., where he gained many friends. Going to Dar-es-Salaam, he quickly built up a strong commercial interest.]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3338, 6 MARCH 1918
Advice has been received that Lieutenant Walter Henry FRAME, R.N.R., son of Mr A. Frame, St. Kilda, has been awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for bravery in the navy. Lieutenant Frame enlisted and sailed with the Main Body, Australians, and was at the landing on Gallipoli. He also saw service in France, for which he received the Military Medal and bar. He has three brothers on active service, and another was discharged from camp after serving two months there.
Mr C. Fynmore, of this city, has received a cablegram from the High Commissioner stating that his son; Lieutenant Noel Nelson Lovell FYNMORE, R.F.A., would be leaving England on February 27 for Mesopotamia. Lieutenant Fynmore was wounded in France in November, 1916, and after a long convalescence was on duty at various camps on the East Coast of England.
Mr David Wratten, Owaka, has received a letter from his son, Sergeant James Frederick WRATTEN, who has been wounded for the third time, and was at the time of writing (December 24) in Shrewsbury Hospital, England. Sergeant Wratten was in Scotland when the war broke out, and at once joined the Seaforth Highlanders, in which regiment he served till he was wounded at the battle of Loos. After this he was transferred to the Machine Gun Section, where, with the exception of six days, when he was slightly wounded with shrapnel, he has been ever since. The letter runs: "I was wounded again on the third of this month, during an attack we made near Ypres. Out of 31 of us only two escaped, 13 were killed, and 16 wounded. It is good to be back in Blighty again, if only for a short spell, away from it all. They treat us very well here — nothing is too good for us; I have had my middle right finger amputated, and also had a piece of shrapnel in my left eye. The eye is going on all right and I don't expect to be in hospital long, then a few weeks of convalescence and back to the front again, I suppose. But of course, someone has to do it, and we said we could, didn't we?"

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3339, 13 MARCH 1918
Mr and Mrs Robert Gabites, of Broad Bay, formerly of Dunedin, are in receipt of the following letter from Brigadier-general Braithwaite in regard to the death of their son, Lieutenant Cyril Douglas GABITES: "Although I am a stranger to you, and know full well that no words of mine can be of any comfort to you at this time, yet I would like to tell you how deeply I sympathise and feel for you in your irreparable loss. The death of your most gallant son in action at the head of his men is a great loss to this brigade. He fell during the attack which my brigade carried out against the Polderhoek Chateau ... A brother [Albert George GABITES] is with the Canadian Forces in France, and a third brother [Edmond Winterscale GABITES] was in German West Africa when war broke out, but is now back in New Zealand [See NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR ONE - PRISONERS OF WAR - AFRICA].

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3340, 20 MARCH 1918
The friends of Captain Colin Macdonald GILRAY, well known as the Rhodes Scholar from New Zealand in 1907, and as the dashing threequarter back who played for Otago University, for Otago, and for New Zealand, and subsequently for Oxford University and for Scotland, will be pleased to learn that he has been awarded the Military Cross in recognition of his services as captain of one of the companies in the British Rifle Brigade.
Concerning the late Alexander Manson Moncrieff FINLAYSON, D.Sc., who died of wounds in Flanders on July 23, 1917, his father, the Rev. A. M. Finlayson, has received a letter from Professor Watts, of the Imperial College of Science and Technology, London, in which the latter says: "Although I heard rumours; your letter was the first definite notification I have had as to the death of your son. This is a matter of great grief to his many friends and fellow-geologists on this side, who were much attached to him, and held him in high honour for the excellent quality, of the work he had already performed and the rich promise of future achievement. I beg to offer you my most sincere and respectful sympathy in so serious and irreplaceable a loss, and to hope that it will be some consolation to you to know how many and devoted friends he made here and what a favourable impression his work had already created. It is our custom here to put on record the services to science of Fellows of the Geological Society. Any information you are good enough to supply shall be made use of. . . . We have, I think, a complete collection of his published works, and I can apply to someone in Steel Brothers for a note of his work for them, which was of much value. I should like, in conclusion, to say that I never had a more hard-working or more satisfactory student, or one who developed more quickly into an accomplished geologist. I was very fond of him, and feel the personal loss most keenly, for I believe he was as truly attached to me as I was to him, and that is saying a great deal."

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3343, 10 APRIL 1918
Information has been received that Captain Roland Arthur Herslet FULTON, R.A.M.C., eldest son of Lieutenant-colonel R. Fulton, of Dunedin, has been awarded the Croix de Guerre for meritorious services as regimental medical officer attached to the 13th Middlesex Regiment during the engagements at Ypres.
Flight-lieutenant George Scott MURRAY, of the Tasman district, who was awarded the Military Cross for services rendered during the East African campaign, has been promoted to the rank of captain. Captain Murray received his decoration at the hands of the King, and on latest advices he was leaving England for France.
News has been received of the death in action of Captain William Campbell SPROTT, Military Cross, eldest son of the Right Rev. T. H. Sprott (Bishop of Wellington). Captain Sprott was a brilliant young man on the threshold of a career that promised to lead him into a life of great usefulness. He was educated at the Wanganui Collegiate School and at Wellington College, and later at Victoria College and at Cambridge. At Victoria College he won the senior scholarship in Greek, and also the Jacob Joseph Scholarship, in his graduation year, and he subsequently took his M.A. degree with first class honours in classics. At Cambridge he achieved the classical and the history tripos. When the war burst upon the Empire he was assistant master in Victoria College, Jersey, but he at once answered the call, volunteering in August, 1914. He was commissioned second lieutenant in November 1914, and since then has seen much service. He has been twice mentioned in despatches and twice wounded.
Word has been received from London that Second Lieutenant Lorne de Hutton HUTTON, second son of the late Mr David C. Hutton, of the School of Art, Dunedin, was killed in action on March 23. Lieutenant Hutton who received his education at the Arthur Street School, served his apprenticeship as a joiner at Findlay and Murdoch's, and for a few years he was with Mr Robert Forest, architect. Prior to the outbreak of war he proceeded to London to continue his studies in architecture, and while there obtained the A.R.I.B.A. diploma. Three years ago he enlisted as a cadet in the Artists' Rifles, and after undergoing training in various camps in Britain, received his commission. Since then he has been in the Machine Gun Corps in different sectors of the line in Belgium, France, and Italy.
The friends of Captain Edward Fletcher ROBERTS, I.O.M., of the Army Ordnance Department, who has been two years in Mesopotamia, will be pleased to hear that he has been promoted to the rank of major, and will be shortly transferred to England. Advice of this has been received per cable by his father, Mr Edward Roberts, C.E.
Nursing Sister Mildred REES, formerly of Napier, who has been in the Imperial Army service in France since the outbreak of war, has recently been mentioned in despatches by Sir Douglas Haig for distinguished services at the front.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3345, 24 APRIL 1918
Mr C. A. Wilkinson, M.P., has received word from friends in England that his son Lieutenant Charles Harold WILKINSON has been awarded the Croix de Guerre, Belgium. Lieutenant Wilkinson was previously awarded the Military Cross. He was severely wounded in the Cambrai battle, but is now in a fair way to recovery.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3346, 1 MAY 1918
Mr George Pinckney of Glenaray Station, Southland, has received word that his eldest son John William (Jack) PINCKNEY is reported missing. He joined King Edward's Horse at the beginning of the war, and had lately been moved to Italy.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3349, 22 MAY 1918
The appointment of Sister Agnes MACMILLAN as matron of the new Convalescent Home for Soldiers at Montecillo is announced. Sister MacMillan, who was a member of the Queen Alexandra Imperial Army Nursing Service in England, served for a year in France on the staff of the New Zealand hospital service, and she possesses the distinction of having done Red Cross work in France before any nurses left these shores. She returned to New Zealand about a year ago, and at present is living at Milton.
Last October Major George Dunnett HENDERSON, M.C., Royal West Kent Regiment (son of Mr A. D. Henderson, Christchurch), was awarded the D.S.O. At the time no particulars were given, but these are since available. The distinction was conferred upon Major Henderson, who “in an attack, when his commanding officer, was wounded soon after the advance started, he took command of the battalion and directed the operations with marked ability and resource. When the enemy counter-attacked he rallied his men, regained the position, and saved a critical situation. He was largely responsible for the success of the attack, and set a splendid example of coolness and resource in the face of great difficulties.”
Second Lieutenant Keith Rodney PARK, M.C., R.F.A. and R.F.C. (son of Professor Park, Dunedin), has been awarded a bar to his Military Cross “for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in accounting for nine enemy aircraft, three of which were completely destroyed and six driven down out of control.”
Second Lieutenant James HANNAY, attd. K.R.R.C., has been awarded the Military Cross for “conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He commanded his company for five days in the line, leading them in the assault, though he was wounded, and encouraging them by his example and courage. He held a most difficult position, and showed great determination in continually harassing the enemy with Lewis gun and rifle fire.”
The London Gazette of March 22 contains the following notification of the circumstances under which Lieutenant Oscar Eugene GALLIE, M.C., R.F.A., was awarded the Distinguished Service Order “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. His battery was very heavily shelled while in action; four guns were destroyed and ammunition dumps were set on fire. He set the battery a splendid example by walking up and down in the open, encouraging the remaining detachments and puttin out fires. Later, the battery was again heavily shelled when firing in reply to an S.O.S signal, and he again behaved with the utmost gallantry, encouraging the men, putting out fires, and keeping his guns firing. He set a magnificent example of courage and devotion to duty throughout the operations." Lieutenant Gallie was promoted captain, and specially mentioned in despatches from Field-marshal Sir Douglas Haig on November 7, 1917. Captain Gallie is a son of Mr John Gallie, of Wellington South.
Mr O. B. Pemberton, secretary of the Canterbury Agricultural and Pastoral Association, has just received a letter from his brother, Acting-captain Thomas James PEMBERTON formerly of the Lyttelton Times and Otago Daily Times staffs, who had a while previously returned to France after recovering from wounds. Acting-captain Pemberton, who is attached to the Bedfordshires, had again been in the firing line for a time when he was sent to a training college to qualify for his captain's commission. Here he met several old scholars of the Christchurch Boys' High School, who were also undergoing training. Particular mention is made in Acting-captain Pemberton's letter of the immense amount of work which is now being undertaken in various branches of army service by the women's auxiliaries, thus releasing many men for duties nearer the firing line. In the course of a very newsy budget, Acting-captain Pemberton relates a remarkable coincidence in connection with his return to the firing line. With his regiment he was ordered to hold a position, which was the exact place where he had been previously wounded. He had no sooner arrived than the Huns commenced shelling the place, and one shell fell where Acting-captain Pemberton was with his company. Fortunately it was only a gas shell, and not a high explosive, but even so, it was a welcome that would rather have been dispensed with.
Lieutenant Charles Wallace SAUNDERS, D.C.M., New Zealand Engineers (Dunedin), has been discharged from the N.Z.E.F. to take up work of national importance with the Ministry of Munitions.
Rifleman Harold Charles BRAY, 26/1087, N.Z.R.B., has been transferred from the N.Z.E.F. to the Australian Navy.
Private Nathaniel Leonard WILLOUGHBY [Nathaniel Leonard Leybourne BERTIE-WILLOUGHBY], 38821, 3rd W.I.R., has been demobilised for two months for the purpose of working on an invention.
Staff-sergeant Morris Jack FULLER [Maurice Jack FULLER], 2/40, D.H.Q., N.Z.F.A., who was recommended for a commission bv General Godley last July, is now second lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery.
Private Arthur George SPIERS [SPIER], Coldstream Guards (Dannevirke), is at present laid up with gastric ulcer, and is in hospital in Nottinghamshire.
Lance-corporal Norman Ellesmere HEWITT, 21324, Royal Fusiliers, lately wounded, comes from Dunedin.
Five New Zealanders engaged in the R.N.V.R. Motor-boat Patrol Service, based in Italy, have recently been promoted from sub-lieutenants to lieutenants. They are: William Ivan TURNBULL (Wellington, now in England on short leave), Arthur Edmond CHOYCE, Spencer Rex MASON (Wellington), Bertie William BEAUMONT (Auckland), and Anthony Charles FELL (Wellington).
Mr Norman Charles WISEMAN (formerly No. 2/1576, N.Z.F.A.), has taken his discharge from the N.Z.E.F. for a commission in the Royal Naval Air Service. He is a probationary flight officer, and is at present at the Royal Naval College, Greenwich.
Second Lieutenant Augustus Alfred Becher TEGNER, S.T.C., attached to the Intermediate Supply Depot at Kut, is a New Zealand Main Body man. He left the dominion with the Wellington Mounted Rifles under Brigadier-general Meldrum. [Military File - attached to 21st MR to enable him to leave NZ to join the Indian Army. Discharged on arrival at Bombay 18 March 1917]
Three R.F.C. Cadets who reached England last December and have been training at Blackdown, are about to leave for Egypt to complete their course. These are: Leslie Alfred LIMBRICK (Napier), Craig Wood GILLIES (Hakataramea), and John Erickson STEVENS.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3350, 29 MAY 1918
Among the decorated officers who recently returned was Captain George Scott MURRAY, R.F.C. Captain Murray joined the Imperial Army in England, and was attached to the Royal Fusiliers. He was later sent to German East Africa with the Royal Flying Corps, from where he has been invalided home to New Zealand. He was awarded the Military Cross in January last for repeatedly carrying out bombing raids and obtaining valuable information regarding the enemy. Captain Murray was decorated by the King at Buckingham Palace in January last. He is a Nelson boy, and left New Zealand to join the Royal Flying Corps.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3351, 5 JUNE 1918
Mr F. M. Drewitt, of the United Service Hotel, Christchurch, has received word that his son, Captain Herbert Frank Stacey DREWITT, flight commander, R.F.C. was awarded the Military Cross on April 12 for special reconnaissance work in France. Captain Drewitt is 25 years of age, and was trained at the Auckland Flying SchooJ.
Advice has been received by Mrs Juriss, wife of Lieutenant Maximillan (Max) JURISS, M.C., who was made prisoner in the early stages of the war, that he is about to be exchanged as one of the officers who have been two years in captivity. The letter instructed his relatives here to send no further parcels of food, as he was likely to be sent either to Holland or Switzerland (for exchange) within a few weeks. Lieutenant Juriss (who was at one time a member of the N.Z.R.A. in Wellington) went Home to enlist, and was given a commission in the 2nd London Regiment.
News has come to hand of the death in action of Sergeant Hubert Sydney TURTILL. Turtill is best known to the public as a footballer. He was one of the best full backs New Zealand has produced. He represented Canterbury in interprovincial matches, and the South Island against the North. He joined the League team which visited England, and was induced to join the professional ranks. After a few years successful playing he settled down as an hotel keeper. Some months ago he joined the West Lancashire Engineers Regiment, and proceeded to France with the rank of sergeant.
Advice has been received at Matakanui from British Headquarters that a promising young man of the district, Michael Thomas RYAN, has been so unfortunate as to have an arm shot off. Ryan left Matakanui before the outbreak of war in order to join the regular army at Home, and as one of the King's Own Rifle Regiment, he went to France in the early days of the struggle, and was wounded in the retreat from Mons. When he had recovered he sat for an examination as Instructor of musketry, and secured a brilliant pass, being placed highest with 100 per cent of marks — of 26 candidates from the North of England. As it was impossible for him to secure promotion above the rank of staff sergeant major while he held the position of a musketry instructor, he made repeated efforts to be transferred to the fighting forces, but it was not until recently that he could be spared from his instructional duties to return to the front.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3353, 19 JUNE 1918
The first aviator from Kaitangata, Mr George CARTER, was tendered a send-off at the railway station upon his departure on Monday, 16th inst.,to join the Royal Flying Corps on active service. Mr Carter successfully passed all flying tests after three weeks and five days training at the Flying School.
Major Hugh SHORT, R.A.M.C, who has received the British Empire Order, is the only son of the late Mr J. C. Short. He received his education at the Otago University, and at the outbreak of the war was on the staff of the Dunedin Hospital. He left with the Main Body, was at the landing at Gallipoli, and was invalided to London in August. For two years he was medical officer at Hornchurch, and in January last he was appointed senior medical officer at Sling Camp.
A Press Association message from Wellington states Mr Christopher Smith, of Wellington, has received news that his son Aubrey Golding SMITH has been awarded the Italian decoration "Valor Militalis," corresponding to the British Victoria Cross. He has also been made a member of the British Empire Order. Mr Smith left three years ago, and after a few months in France went to Italy, and has served as a volunteer transport officer ever since. The action for which the decoration was bestowed was performed a year ago, but its nature is not yet known here.
Mr E. Godfred, of Port Chalmers, has been advised of the death of Mr Robert Scott POLLOCK, who was a popular resident of Port Chalmers for a number of years. The deceased, who was a member of Lodge Cargill Kilwinning, S.C., left Port Chalmers soon after the outbreak of war on transport duty, and was later transferred to the auxiliary naval service. He was killed while engaged in mine-laying in the North Sea. During his stay in Port Chalmers he was employed by Messrs Stevenson and Cook, and he enjoyed a large degree of popularity with his mates.
A San Francisco paper states that John Newton STORRY, a civil engineer, quietly closed up his business affairs after hearing Harry Lauder's stirring call to arms. He kept his intention a secret from his closest associates. Storry made the rounds of every recruiting office, in San Francisco, seeking to enlist as a private in any organisation that promised immediate service at the front, but failed because he was two years over the age limit. Storry persisted. Through the British Consulate he succeeded in enlisting as a private in a field company of the Canadian Engineers. Not until then did he tell his fellow club members. He departed one Sunday night, and is now in Vancouver, B.C. On the steamer Storry and a companion were attacked by three I.W.W. agitators, who had sought to dissuade them from joining their regiments. They subdued the trio and turned them over to a United States marshal. The above (says the Tuapeka Times) refers to Mr Jack Storry, only surviving son of Mrs Storry, of Dunedin formerly of Lawrence, and a brother of Mrs E. C. Browne (Lawrence) and Mrs E. Tamblyn (of Dunedin). He is a native of Lawrence, was educated at the local school, and served his time as a compositor on the Tuapeka Times. After working for some time as a journeyman in Wellington and Dunedin, he left New Zealand about 20 years ago for the Klondyke, where, as the Americans say, he "made good." Some years ago he revisited New Zealand, and after a brief stay with his relatives, returned to Vancouver, where he entered into business as a land and commission agent.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3354, 26 JUNE 1918
The Governor-general to-night presented posthumous awards to the next of kin of deceased recipients. VICTORIA CROSS - Lieutenant commander William Edward SANDERS, R.N.R (Mr E. H. Sanders, Takapuna, father) in recognition of conspicuous gallantry, consummate coolness and skill in command of his Majesty's ships in action. DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS. Flight-lieutenant Thomas Grey CULLING (Mr T. S. Culling, Remuera, father), in recognition of services on April 23, 1917, when, with two other machines he engaged a formation of nine hostile scouts and two-seater machines. Two two-seater machines were shot down — one by Lieutenant Culling unassisted.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3356, 10 JULY 1918
Mrs Andrew, wife of General Albert William ANDREW, has arrived here and met her husband, who is of the Indian Army. He began his career as a distinguished volunteer officer, a captain of one of the companies of the old North Canterbury Battalion, which has given so many soldiers to the front. He obtained a commission in the Imperial Army, and selecting India, rose to his present position. He has been serving in France.
Lieutenant-colonel Aubrey Nigel Henry Molyneux (The Hon.) HERBERT D.S.O, who is now with a British formation, has relinquished his appointment of officer commanding the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces, Ordnance Corps, D.A.D.O.S. to the division. He is succeeded in the latter post by Second Lieutenant Charles Ingram GOSSAGE, with the temporary rank of captain.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3357, 17 JULY 1918
News has been received by Mr W. M. Kirkcaldy, of Dunedin, that his son, Lieutenant Grange Inglis KIRKCALDY who was reported missing in April, is now known to be a prisoner of war in Germany. Lieutenant Kirckaldy was educated at St. Clair School and the Waitaki High School, and was at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, when war broke out. He at once joined the A.S.C. and held the rank of captain, but was then transferred to the Black Watch as lieutenant. He held the Mons Medal.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3358, 24 JULY 1918
The Military Cross has been conferred upon Captain George Geoffrey SALE, R.E, son of Professor Sale, late of Dunedin. The news of the bestowal of this award was received by Professor Sale on his eighty-seventh birthday. Captain Sale is a brother of Major J.B. Sale of Invercargill, who has left for camp.
Engineer-lieutenant-commander William EARNSHAW, R.N., has been transferred from one of the dreadnoughts and appointed to Glasgow, on the staff of the Admiral Superintendent, while a new destroyer he is to be in charge of is being built. He was strongly urged by the authorities to accept charge of Fisgard, the establishment for the training of engineer artificers, but preferred to take part in the more active work of warfare. He had previously been offered the position of senior instructor of engineering at Portsmouth. He hopes to proceed to sea again before the end of the year. Lieutenant Earnshaw is a son of the Hon. William Earnshaw, M.L.C., of Wellington.

Second Lieutenant James Moir PATERSON, M.C, R.F.A., has been awarded a bar to his Military Cross. Mr Paterson practised as a barrister in Dunedin before coming to England two years ago for his commission.

During an engagement Major Robert William HANNAH, M.C., R.F.A. (Wellington) maintained the ammunition supply and conducted the advance of his battery with the greatest skill and resource. He kept in touch with the infantry in spite of the difficult state of the ground and intense enemy shelling, and though wounded, he remained on duty. Major Hannah set an example of courage and initiative which had a splendid effect on his men, and he has been awarded the D.S.O. His war services began in Samoa, and later he came to England, obtaining a commission in the R.F.A. in the middle of 1915. He is an old boy of Wellington College, and second son of Mr Robert Hannah.

Captain (now Major) Thomas Frederick CORKILL, R.A.M.C. (Wellington), received his Military Cross from the King at Buckingham Palace a few days ago.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3361, 14 AUGUST 1918
Cable advice has been received at the Base Records Office stating that Lieutenant James Ferrand DEARDEN, D.S.O., M.C., a New Zealander, at present attached to the 2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers, has been awarded a second bar to the Military Cross. Lieutenant Dearden's next-of-kin is unknown at Base Records Office.

Second Lieutenant John Endell WANKLYN, Royal Field Artillery (now deceased), has been awarded the Military Cross. His next-of-kin is Mr W. H. Wanklyn, secretary of the Canterbury Jockey Club.

Word has been received in Dunedin that Captain David Eardley FENWICK, who left his medical practice in India to go to the front in France, has been promoted to major, his promotion to date back from November. Major Fenwick, who has served a long period on active service, is at present stationed at Codford, and returned soldiers speak very highly of his ability and painstaking care. Major Fenwick is a native of Dunedin, and is the son of Mr G. Fenwick, managing director of the Otago Daily Times and Witness Company. An elder son, Captain George FENWICK, volunteered from Auckland, where he had gained more than a local reputation as an eye and ear specialist, and has also a lengthy period of service in Egypt, France, and England.

Sergeant Michael Thomas RYAN, D.C.M., of Matakanui, who has had the misfortune to lose his right arm, declares, in a letter received by the last mail, that he is as fit as a fiddle, and that he is looking forward to receiving an artificial arm and then to returning to New Zealand. He had joined the Imperial army, and had sole charge of a platoon for six weeks, and been then appointed A.S.M. of the 1st King's, [The (Liverpool) King's Regiment] when he suffered the casualty which has produced his disablement. Prior to this he received what he calls a stiff dose of gas consequent on his taking off his mask when two of his men were buried by a gas shell which landed on the edge of the trench, and when it was necessary to dig them out without delay in order to save them from suffocation. He was partially blind for three days after this experience, and did not recover his voice for three weeks. He mentions the delight he felt when he discovered that the captain of his company was a New Zealander - now Major Hugh John DUFF, D.S.O., M.C., who is a station owner in Hawke's Bay, and states that he had long conversations with him about New Zealand and pastoral topics — a pleasant change from such subjects of talk as "whizz-bangs," raids, etc..

Lieutenant Henry Stokes RICHARDS, who was reported killed in action on August 1, aged 24, was one of the most brilliant graduates of Canterbury College. He was the first New Zealand Rhodes Scholar selected from Canterbury in November 1914. He went to England in the following July, sat for his Responsions examination at Oxford, and passed. Directly afterwards he enlisted in the Essex Regiment. He was sent over to France in July 1916, and took part in the battle of the Somme, being wounded on September 26. He was in hospital for 13 months, and on his discharge he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps. According to information received in Christchurch, he was sent to France in May last, and it is probable that he was killed while flying. Lieutenant Richards was extremely popular, not only among the students, but also among the staff of Canterbury College, and on March 6, 1915, shortly before his departure for Oxford, he was presented with a substantial purse of sovereigns, a set of books, and a fountain pen. The late Lieutenant Richards was an old pupil of Rangiora High School, having received five years of his secondary education at that school. Before he left for England he was entertained at a gathering at the school, and received a watch pendant as a parting gift from his schoolmates. He was a son of Mr S. H. Richards, of the Crown Clothing Company, Christchurch.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3363, 28 AUGUST 1918
Mr J. Smaill, Roslyn has received word that his second son, William Archibald SMAILL, who has been in the navy since the war started, has been promoted to the position of chief engine room artificer on H.M.S. Albatross, torpedo destroyer. He had obtained his chief engineer's certificate before joining the navy.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3364, 4 SEPTEMBER 1918
Word was received in Dunedin on the 29th of the death — killed in action — of Lieutenant-colonel Cecil Frederick George HUMPHRIES, a native of New Zealand, who had a wonderful record as a soldier — if not the most wonderful of that of any man from the dominion. The deceased soldier was in England with his mother (Mrs A. Rouse), spending a holiday when war broke out, and he at once joined the rush of volunteers in London, being appointed a sergeant in the Army Service Corps and going at once to France. After a few weeks in the Army Service Corps, Sergeant Humphries applied for a transfer, and joined up as a private with the Manchesters, forming a part of the Indian Expeditionary Force which had just then arrived in France. He was through all the desperate fighting round Laventie, Givenchy, Neuve Chapelle, and Lille, and for gallantry in an engagement when, as he himself described it, the battalion in which he was serving was put in to stop a German Army Corps, he was awarded the D.C.M., and promoted sergeant, the decoration being pinned on his breast on the field by General Willocks. On several occasions he deemed himself highly honoured by being selected from his company to take part with other selected men on night raids across No Man's Land. In 1915 Sergeant Humphries was wounded in the thigh by a piece of shrapnel while lying up on the parapet watching the Gurkhas in action, and was invalided to England. At the base hospital it is recorded that the doctor became much interested in Humphries and his record as a soldier, and though the wounded man made light of his wound the doctor ordered him to take a holiday. Later he was promoted to lieutenant, and was attached to the Highland Light Infantry, and spent some time acting as instructor in Edinburgh. Writing to his relatives in Dunedin he stated that he could not sometimes help smiling to himself when he remembered that a year previously he had hardly known the difference between the butt and the barrel of a gun, and here was acting as an instructor. Later on he returned to France with the Highland Light Infantry, and was again wounded, being shot through the arm, and was awarded the Military Cross. He was invalided back to England, and was again promoted, to captain, and transferred to the Duke of Cornwall's regiment. A cablegram received a few weeks ago stated that he had been promoted to lieutenant-colonel. He also served on the Italian front, and while travelling in a motor car was run down at a crossing by a train and thrown out, escaping without a scratch, the only damage being that the sleeve was torn from his coat — one more narrow escape, as he wrote, from joining the "aerial scouts." Altogether he had been wounded four times. Lieutenant-colonel Humphries was 27 years of age. He was born at Mataura and received part of his education at the Otago Boys' High School. His people then went to live in Christchurch, where his mother was the licensee of the Excelsior Hotel. He was a keen player at golf, and represented Canterbury on the football field against Otago some years ago. His mother is at present living in London. Mrs S. O. Wilson, who is well known on the local concert platform, is a sister, and an aunt, Mrs Dalrymple, lives at Musselburgh.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3365, 11 SEPTEMBER 1918
Cable advice has been received at Base Records giving particulars of the following military awards conferred - Captain (Temp. Lieutenant-colonel) Cuthbert Trelawder MACLEAN (Scots Fusiliers, Royal Flying Corps). As this officer is not a member of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, his nearest relative is not known at Base Records.

Mr J A. McGrath, Inspector of Police at Napier, has received from the Canadian military authorities in London a Military Medal, won by his son, Private Charles Unsworth MCGRATH. Private McGrath was in Canada at the outbreak of war and enlisted in the Royal Canadian Regiment. He was reported missing after the Somme battle, and it is presumed that he is dead. For his services in the same battle he was awarded the Military Medal, which has just been received by his father.

Miss Pennycook (Balclutha) received cable advice from Scotland on Friday afternoon that her father, Lieutenant-colonel William Scott PENNYCOOK, had been killed in action in France on August 21. Lieutenant-colonel Pennycook, who returned to France only a few weeks previously, was in his forty-sixth year, and was born in Scotland... Lieutenant-colonel Pennycook had a family of six children. The eldest, Robert Royleston PENNYCOOK is on home service with the Canadian Forces, and the second son, Jack, is at Lincoln Agricultural College. Miss Pennycook and the three youngest children live in Balclutha.

Advice has been received by Mr Dundas Samuel (Anderson's Bay) that his third son, Sergeant David Samuel, has been killed in action in France... James Elder Adams SAMUEL, the eldest (twin) son, enlisted in Liverpool in the King's Own, and was reported as missing nearly 12 months ago.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3367, 25 SEPTEMBER 1918
Rifleman Con Gordon HUTTON, who is reported to have died from wounds on August 30, was the son of Helen Bryden Douglas and the late Mr David Con Hutton, art master, Dunedin. He received his education at the Arthur Street School and Boys High School. Having passed civil service and matriculated, he entered the services of the National Insurance Company,, and remained there until he enlisted in the Seventeenth Reinforcements. He left New Zealand as a quartermaster-sergeant in the twenty-fourth Reinforcements. His brother, Second Lieutenant Lorne de Hutton HUTTON, was killed by machine-gun bullets on March 23, and was buried near Biefvillers.

Gunner Lionel George ELLISON [ELLISSON], killed in action during the German offensive, was a native of Dunedin, the eldest son of the late Mr Richard Ellison, and was educated at the Albany Street School. He was trained for the sea on the training ship Amokura, and proceeding Home, joined H.M.S Blanche. He saw service in the North Sea for about 12 months, and then transferred into the Imperial army as a gunner. He was in a number of heavy engagements, but escaped with only slight wounds, until he met his death. [504th Bty. Royal Field Artillery]

Captain John Patrick SHAW, R.A.M.C (son of the late Mr John Shaw, of Finegand, Clutha) who is serving with his regiment (the York and Lancasters) in Italy, was awarded the Military Cross in June last.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3368, 2 OCTOBER 1918
Mr John Henderson Pollock STRANG, of Palmerston North, who has been awarded the Croix do Guerre for his services in France, has been a member of the committee of the Manawatu Racing Club for a number of years, and was in his third year as president when he left for England in November, 1915, for the purpose of taking on war work. Immediately on arrival in England he joined up as an honorary ambulance driver on the west front, and has continued the work ever since with little intermission.

Private advice has been received in Christchurch by Miss Okey, Merivale, that Captain Frederick Charles ROBERTS, attached to an Indian regiment [9th Bhopal Infantry] serving in Mesopotamia, has been awarded the Military Cross. Captain Roberts left New Zealand with the Main Body as a trooper in the Otago Mounted Rifles [9/545]. Having served in Kitchener's Horse during the South African war, he proved his worth, and while training in Egypt gained his commission. On account of his knowledge of the Indian language, he was attached to the Indian Expeditionary Force, being given the rank of lieutenant. He was wounded at the taking of Bagdad. On returning to his regiment he was promoted captain.

Mrs R. B. Bannerman has been advised that her husband. Flight-lieutenant Ronald Burns BANNERMAN has been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and promoted to be a captain. Captain Bannerman, who is a son of Mr W. Bannerman, accountant at the Bank of New Zealand, took his flying ticket at the Auckland school last year, and has been six months on service in France.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3371, 23 OCTOBER 1918
Mr Robert Hay has received cable intimation of the death of his son Robert HAY in France on the 9th inst. In the early months of the war Lieutenant Hay enlisted in the ranks of the Royal West Surreys (Queen's), in which he afterwards obtained his commission as second lieutenant, and later was promoted to first. He was born in Dunedin, and educated at the Waitaki Boys' High School, afterwards serving an apprenticeship in the cement business at the Milburn works. He then spent some time in Australia and America, gaining further experience, and finally landed in England, where he obtained the appointment of manager at the old-established business of Knight, Sevan's cement works, which position be held for about 10 years, until his death. The Pirates Football Club and his schoolmates will remember him best as Laddie Hay.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3372, 30 OCTOBER 1918
Corporal James BELL, of the Royal Scots Fusiliers, recently awarded the Medaille Militaire for gallantry in the field of action, is a son of Mr Frank Bell, of Forest Hill, Southland. This young soldier, now 27 years of age, enlisted in the Imperial army at the age of 16 years. He was at Gibraltar when war broke out, and has since seen a lot of hard fighting. He won the M.M. at Ypres two years ago; was made a King's corporal on the field; awarded a bar to the M.M. at St. Quentin on March 22; and again on April 30 he received a similar distinction for bravery. Corporal Bell has also been mentioned in Sir D. Haig's despatches. He has also had his share of suffering, having been four times wounded.

Among those who arrived in Wellington from Melbourne by the Westralia last week was Flight Lieutenant Headley Clarence Arthur Tighe UMBERS, of Dunedin, who is on a few months furlough. Lieutenant Umbers left New Zealand as an n.c.o. on the staff of General Godley, and after a varied experience with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force qualified for a commission in the Royal Air Force, in which connection he has been engaged on the Salonika front. Lieutenant Umbers speaks glowingly of the position generally in that theatre of war, particularly praising the fighting qualities of the Greek Army, which is doing wonderfully good work. The Serbian troops, too, are now a finely organised body, who in fighting on their own territory, are doing serviceable work for the Allies.

Lieutenant Ralph Edward Fulton BARNETT of the 8th Lancashires, reported missing in September, 1917, and now reported killed in action, was born in Dunedin 21 years ago, and was educated at Christ's College, Christchurch. He went Home in 1915 with his father, Dr Barnett, C.M.G, who was stationed in Malta and Cairo, and at Brockenhurst Hospital. Lieutenant Barnett joined the Machine-gun Corps of the Lancashire Fusiliers and saw active service in Egypt, Gallipoli and France.

Advice has been received that Engineer Sub-Lieutenant William Gordon MACKAY, R.N.R, eldest son of Mr N H Mackay, 69 Frederick Street, was killed in action on October 18. He left New Zealand with the 8th Artillery Reinforcements three years ago, and saw service in Egypt and France. As he was a chief engineer he was transferred for service in the navy a year ago. He was educated at Port Chalmers School and Otago Boy's High School. He served his apprenticeship to the engineering with Messrs Gardiner and Co, Port Chalmers.

Word was received last week of the death of Lieutenant-commander George Andrew DRUMMOND, who was killed in action [Royal Naval Reserve]. He was born in Broughton street, South Dunedin, a little over 28 years ago. The deceased officer was educated at the Kensington and Boys High Schools, and then went to sea, serving on the Bona, St. Kilda, and Cape Brett, being third officer and then mate of this vessel. The young sailor returned to Dunedin on the Rotorua, and then joined the Hinemoa as third mate, and of which steamer he was first officer when he volunteered three years ago and went Home in the Wainui. Always of an adventurous nature, Lieutenant-commander Drummond had done great work before he finally met his death. The fore part of his vessel was on one occasion blown away, but he managed to get her back to port. He took part in the attack on Zeebrugge, and was promoted and mentioned in despatches. The deceased officer's father, who was an engine-driver in Dunedin, is now locomotive foreman at Frankton Junction. His mother is at present on a visit to Dunedin. There was no relationship between Lieutenant-commander George Andrew Drummond and Lieutenant Geoffrey Heneage Drummond, V.C. (R.N.V.R).

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3373, 6 NOVEMBER 1918
Amongst the passengers by the Westralia on her last trip from Melbourne was Lieutenant Walter Henry FRAME, of the Royal Naval Reserve, D.S.C., M.M. (with bar). He arrived in Dunedin on Saturday night, and is staying at his parents' residence in St. Kilda. Lieutenant Frame enlisted with the Main Australian Force, and saw service with it until the end of 1916, when he was invalided to England to undergo an operation, from which he soon recovered. He was then transferred to the navy, and, being a master mariner, did not have to spend very long in barracks before gaining his commission. He was born in Oamaru, and finished his education at the Albany Street School. He afterwards joined one of the Union Company's vessels as brass boy, and gradually worked his way up the ladder. He was fourth mate of the Monowai when he left the company's service some seven years ago. Lieutenant Frame, who is accompanied by his wife (a Melbourne native), is on furlough, and intends to spend three or four weeks in Dunedin.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3374, 13 NOVEMBER 1918
A brilliant officer has been lost to the Australian Flying Corps through the death of Lieutenant Hector NICOL, who has been killed in a motoring accident. He was a foremost expert in aerial telephony, and had been lent to the Royal Air Force. Lieutenant Hector Nicol enlisted in Melbourne on December 6, 1915, at the age of 29. He had formerly been a railway operating porter, and was a married man, his widow now living at Avoca. Lieutenant Nichol was born at Maheno, New Zealand. In New Zealand he gained some military experience as a member of the Volunteer Rifle Club, to which he belonged for six months. He was appointed equipment officer and second lieutenant on November 28 of last year, and promoted lieutenant in the Australian Flying Corps on February 28 of this year. His death occurred on Wednesday, October 16, in Salisbury (England) Infirmary, from fracture of the skull.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3384, 22 JANUARY 1919
News has been received that Major Philip Randall WOODHOUSE has been awarded a second bar to the Military Cross that he gained in 1916, the first bar having been awarded a year ago. Major Woodhouse, who is an old High School boy, and a graduate of Otago University, has been on active service in France throughout the whole period of the war. He joined the R.A.M.C. in London, where he was preparing to sit for his F.R.C.S., crossing to France in the middle of August, 1914, and was with a field ambulance, following up the retreating Germans, when the armistice was signed. During that period he has been three times wounded and once slightly gassed

Sir John Findlay's two sons, Major John Wilfred FINDLAY and Captain James Lloyd FINDLAY, M.C., of the Imperial army, who returned to New Zealand by the Niagara, are, with Lady Findlay, on a short visit to Dunedin.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3438, 3 FEBRUARY 1920
Mr Ronald Burns BANNERMAN, late captain in the Royal Air Force, who is a Dunedin boy has joined the staff of Mr E.R Bowler, solicitor, Gore.

Dr John Patrick SHAW, son of the late Mr John Shaw, of Finegand, Clutha, is a passenger by the Bremen. He took his medical course at Middlesex, London, and joined the Imperial army at the outbreak of the war. He intends to settle in New Zealand.




Return To HOME

FAMILIES I AM RESEARCHING | MISCELLANEOUS GENEALOGICAL STUFF | NEW ZEALAND — ON LINE GENEALOGICAL AND FAMILY HISTORY RESOURCES | NEW ZEALAND — YOUNG BOY IMMIGRANT SCHEME 1911 — 1914 | NEW ZEALAND DISASTERS AND TRAGEDIES | NEW ZEALAND MISCELLANEOUS GENEALOGICAL INDEXES | NEW ZEALAND LAND WARS — MISCELLANEOUS GENEALOGICAL INDEXES | NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR ONE | NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR TWO | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR AND WAR MEMORIALS — BY LOCATION | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR AND WAR MEMORIALS — BY CONFLICT | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR — MILITARY NURSES | PAKEHA/MAORI TRANSLITERATIONS | PASSENGER LISTS TO NEW ZEALAND | SHAND — FAMILY HISTORY | SOUTH TARANAKI, NEW ZEALAND — GENEALOGICAL RESOURCES | SPONDON, DERBYSHIRE, ENGLAND — GENEALOGICAL RESOURCES | WANGANUI COLLEGIATE SCHOOL 1865 — 1947 | WESTERN BAY OF PLENTY, NEW ZEALAND — GENEALOGICAL RESOURCES