NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR ONE
ALIENS, INTERNEES AND PRISONERS OF WAR IN NEW ZEALAND
AND OTHER ANTI-GERMAN NEWS
1914 - 1919


GERMAN-SPEAKING SETTLEMENTS AND COMMUNITIES IN 19TH-CENTURY NEW ZEALAND
NORTHLAND: Houhora, Awanui
AUCKLAND: Puhoi, Pukekohe
WAIKATO: Ohaupo
TARANAKI: Inglewood, Midhirst, Stratford, Eltham, Patea, Normanby
HAWKE'S BAY: Norsewood, Napier, Takapau, Makaretu
RANGITIKEI/MANAWATU/WAIRARAPA: Marton, Rongotea, Halcombe, Carterton
NELSON: Ranzau (Hope), Sarau (Upper Moutere), Rosental, Neudorf, Hanover, Schonbach
WESTLAND: Jackson's Bay, Smoothwater Valley, Hokitika
CANTERBURY: Germantown (Waimate), Hanover Valley, Marshlands, Oxford, German Bay (Akaroa)
OTAGO: Waihola, Allanton, German Hill
SOUTHLAND: Germantown (Gore)
Adapted from Krull, Friedrich August The Indescribable Beauty - Letters Home to Germany from Wellington, New Zealand 1859 & 1862 (2012 Awa Press: Wellington) edited by Mary Varnham.

SOUTHLAND TIMES, ISSUE 17727, 12 AUGUST 1914
Considerable surprise was occasioned in Christchurch on Saturday when it became known that Mr Karl JOOSTEN, German Consul for Christchurch, had been arrested in connection with an alleged contract for the German Army ...

FREE LANCE, VOLUME XV, ISSUE 737, 15 AUGUST 1914
Among the German residents who were arrested this week in Wellington and taken away to Somes Island, as prisoners of war was Mr. Paul DIETRICH, who some time ago started in business on Lambton-quay as a ladies' tailor. One could not but feel strong sympathy for the slight blonde, rather fragile little man who had done no one any harm and has had a hard struggle to establish himself in business. He has fought bravely against adverse circumstances and just as his skill as a tailor was coming to be recognised, war breaks out and down comes the hand of the Law, grips him by the arm and hales him away to Somes Island, all because Kaiser Bill can only see red and Paul Dietrich has had the misfortune to be born in Germany.

KING COUNTRY CHRONICLE, VOLUME VIII, ISSUE 705, 19 SEPTEMBER 1914
The four prisoners of war brought from Fiji by the steamer Navua, were conducted to their quarters on Motuihi Island on Thursday. The party comprised the late Governor of Samoa, Dr Eric SCHULZT, his secretary, Herr MARS, the wireless expert at Samoa, Herr HIRSCH, and a Hongkong merchant, Herr HANSEN [HANSEEN?]. A fairly large crowd was present at the wharf to secure a glimpse of the prisoners, but if the people expected anything spectacular they must have been disappointed. The proceedings were quiet and lacking in display.

MANAWATU STANDARD, VOLUME XLI, ISSUE 9911, 29 SEPTEMBER 1914
PALMERSTON NORTH. A case was heard in the Magistrate's Court this morning which illustrates how far reaching are the effects of the war in Europe, and how they make themselves felt so far away as New Zealand. It was a claim by Young and Bailey, motor engineers from H T BOEKEN due for goods supplied and services rendered...all his securities were locked up in Germany as a result of the war. At the present he had no income, and had been the recipient of no less than six summonses within the last few weeks ... Witness, addressing the Bench, stated that he was born in Cologne, in Germany, but had been a British subject for 25 years, and yet there had been dreadful stories told about him. He had been accused of being a German spy and it was said that he had been put on Somes Island, but he was proud to say that the Government of New Zealand, instead of crushing him had upheld him.
When the young German Hugo SEWALD was charged on remand with establishing a wireless plant without permission the police asked for a further remand, with the object of arranging for Sewald to be placed on Somes Island as a prisoner of war. The chief detective stated that he wished it to be known that any unauthorised person found in possession of wireless apparatus would immediately be arrested as a prisoner of war. Sewald was further charged with obtaining a wireless plant under false pretences and was remanded. Bail was refused.
A number of Germans, until lately officials at Samoa, arrived at Wellington from Auckland by the Main Trunk express, and yesterday they were interned at Somes Island. The members of the party were: - Herr TECKLENBURG (Chief Justice and Deputy Governor of Samoa) and his wife, Judge SPERLING, Dr SESSONS (agricultural officer), Herr PHEIFFER (surveyor), Dr SCHUBERT (magistrate), Dr GLANTZ (medical officer), Herr HERRINGER (assistant secretary), Herr LOSCHE (executive officer), Herr PURCH (police officer), and Herr MEYER (secretary) and wife.

WAIRARAPA DAILY TIMES, VOLUME LXVII, ISSUE 14101, 8 OCTOBER 1914
A German subject, Robert LANE, was arrested by the waterfront police. He was granted parole from Somes Island, and shipped as a seaman on the Norwegian barque Fram to Auckland. He has been handed over to the military authorities.

EVENING POST, VOLUME LXXXVIII, ISSUE 98, 22 OCTOBER 1914
Tho ex-Deputy Governor of Samoa (Herr TECKLENBURG) and party of six, together with two of their wives, were transferred from Somes Island this morning, and placed on board the Main Trunk train for Auckland. Upon arrival in the northern city they will be taken to Motuihi Island, where they will be interned during the period of the war. It is understood that the rest of the German Samoan prisoners on Somes Island, numbering some 20 persons, will also be transferred to Auckland during the course of the next few days. There are at present 30 German prisoners of war from Samoa in New Zealand, of whom three (including the ex-Governor of the island, Dr. SCHULTZ) are already in Auckland.

EVENING POST, VOLUME LXXXVIII, ISSUE 129, 27 NOVEMBER 1914
Mr. Eberhard FOCKE, the late German Consul in Wellington, was arrested by the police late yesterday afternoon upon a charge of corresponding with Germany secretly, and was handed over to the military authorities. He was taken over to Somes Island, where he is now a prisoner of war. Mr. Focke, who has been a highly-respected citizen of Wellington for many years, was born in Bremen, and was in business there for four years, after which he went to London and entered business there. He arrived in New Zealand in 1879, and has resided here for many years. He was a naturalised British subject. [EVENING POST, VOLUME LXXXIX, ISSUE 34, 10 FEBRUARY 1915 - Mr. E. Focke, who has been on Somes Island for some weeks, has returned to his home in Wellington.]

EVENING POST, VOLUME LXXXVIII, ISSUE 133, 2 DECEMBER 1914
At the request of Colonel Logan, Administrator of Samoa, the New Zealand Defence authorities have decided to send Frederick Edward Norman GAUDIN, who was arrested at Auckland last month, back to Samoa, for trial by court martial. Gaudin, who was a member of the Auckland City Council, and a member of a well-known German firm in Auckland, trading with the Islands, is charged with carrying correspondence from German subjects in Samoa to other Germans in New Zealand and elsewhere, thereby avoiding the censorship which exists in Samoa on all correspondence. He had just been on a visit to Germany's late possesion in the Pacific, and upon his arrival at Auckland by the Navua on the 9th ult. was immediately arrested. He has been a prisoner of war on Motuihi Island, in Auckland Harbour, ever since.

EVENING POST, VOLUME LXXXVIII, ISSUE 144, 15 DECEMBER 1914
Four German members of the crew of the barque Irene, were arrested on arrival at Bluff last night from Malden Island. They are to be sent to Somes Island tomorrow.

EVENING POST, VOLUME LXXXVIII, ISSUE 151, 23 DECEMBER 1914
Henrick Wilhelm Magnus DUERKOP, a German prisoner of war at present interned on Somes Island, appeared at the Magistrate's Court to-day to answer five charges of having attempted to trade with the enemy's subjects. Four of these were laid under the Regulation of Trade Act, 1914, and the fifth under the Trading with the Enemy Act, 1914. The first charge read as follows: - "On or about 17th September, 1914 at Auckland, at a time when His Majesty was at war with a foreign State, to wit, the Empire of Germany, did attempt to supply Gustav J. J. WITT, a person carrying on business in such foreign State, to wit., Hamburg, with certain goods, to wit, 17 casks of casings." The remaining charges concerned alleged offences of a similar character on 6th October, 28th October (two), and 3rd November ... Mr. Duerkop is a partner in the firm of Duerkop and Mackay, merchants, carrying on business at Auckland.

NELSON EVENING MAIL, VOLUME XLVIII, ISSUE XLVIII, 1 JANUARY 1915
GISBORNE. On New Year's Eve a number of young men made a demonstration outside the shop of Friedrich WOHNSIEDLER, a naturalised German who conducts a pork butchery. The crowd increased and the shop was wrecked with stones. At about 2 a.m. the crowd dispersed. They would not listen to the Mayor, and the wind-screen of his motor-car was smashed by volleys of stones. The police showed great patience, which undoubtedly averted a serious riot.

EVENING POST, VOLUME LXXXIX, ISSUE 03, 5 JANUARY 1915
Somewhat of a sensation was caused in a Masterton hairdressing saloon yesterday morning (says to-day's Wairarapa Age), when Sergt. Miller entered and arrested an employee, who had a razor in his hand, and was in the act of shaving a customer. The man's name was Otto THIEL and he came here from Australia shortly after the outbreak of war. His conduct had led the police to suspect that he was a German spy. A search of his effects made it clear that he was a German, reservist, who had been naturalised in Australia. A considerable quantity of German correspondence was found in his possession, together with several changes of clothing, and a "bell-topper." He had also a number of military buttons stamped with the German eagle. He was taken to Wellington in the afternoon, and handed over to the military authorities. He will probably be accommodated at Somes Island until the war is over.

WANGANUI CHRONICLE, ISSUE 20254, 6 JANUARY 1915
Under authority of the military powers, the police to-night raided a camp at Mangapapa, a suburb of Gisborne, and arrested four Germans, including Gottleib WOHNSIEDLER (brother of F. Wohnsiedler, whose pork butchery shop was wrecked by a mob on New Year's Eve). The four prisoners are, it is understood, to be sent to Wellington for internment on Somes Island. Since the New Year riot, there have been threats of mobs wrecking the premises of various alleged Germans, and newspapers now contain advertisements by certain threatened individuals denying German parentage and tracing their ancestry for years back. [The other men were Wilhelm RAUER, aged 27 years, a German artillery reservist, Hans RONNAU, aged 31 years, a German navy reservist and Edward SCHOBER, a 25 year old Austrian reservist.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XL, ISSUE 8975, 23 FEBRUARY 1915
An inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the death on Somes Island, last Saturday, of William LANDGRAF, a prisoner of war, was held yesterday afternoon. Dr Elliot, medical officer of Somes Island, stated that on making a postmortem examination, he found no marks of violence on the body, which was well-nourished. The valves of the heart showed signs of degeneration, and in his opinion the condition of the heart was sufficient to have accounted for death. Henry PETERSEN, a seaman, and a prisoner of war on Somes Island, said that on Saturday morning he and the deceased were engaged in carrying buckets of water from the wharf to the top of the hill. This duty occupied about fifteen minutes, and when it was finished, Landgraf, who appeared to be in the best of health and spirits, went to his room. Anders JOHNSON, a sawmiller, also a prisoner of war, stated that when the deceased, who occupied the same room as himself, came in, witness remarked that he was perspiring. Deceased said he felt all right, but on going over to his bed he fell down in a faint. Witness called the commandant, who had the deceased moved into the fresh air and attended to but Landgraf expired almost immediately. After hearing evidence of a formal nature, the coroner returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, that death was due to heart disease.

FREE LANCE, VOLUME XV, ISSUE 767, 13 MARCH 1915
In Wellington the devil still finds silly tales, for idle tongues to tell. Some of the rumours regarding Professor George William Edward Ernest VON ZEDLITZ have been almost delicious in a wild sort of way. One was that he had been caught signalling to a German cruiser, taken to Somes Island, and immediately shot. Truth to tell, the Professor is quite alive and well. He is German by birth, but he took his degree at Oxford, and he married an English girl in New Zealand. It's silly to talk shooting him before he's done anything shotworthy. [Also see NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XL, ISSUE 9072, 17 JUNE 1915 - Professor Von Zedlitz Will Retain Position.] [Also see Zedlitz, George William Edward Ernest von - Dictionary of New Zealand Biography.

OTAGO DAILY TIMES, ISSUE 16341, 25 MARCH 1915
Two young Germans - Edwin BALKE and Paul WOOLF, who were interned at Somes Island, escaped this morning by swimming over one mile and a-half to Petone, where they surrendered to the police. They stated that the object of their escape was to draw attention to the treatment of the Germans on the island. They had been employed at road work, which they declared was fit for convicts, and not for prisoners of war. They appeared little the worse for their swim, though a bleak southerly wind was blowing. One of the men lost his bundle of clothes, which he had strapped to his back, and used some of his companion's clothes on landing.

EVENING POST, VOLUME LXXXIX, ISSUE 105, 5 MAY 1915
Last evening, about 8 o'clock, two of the German prisoners interned on Somes Island commandeered a row boat and made good their escape. It was dark, and it was not noticed in what direction they made off. This morning, however, the empty boat was found on the shore of the harbour between Rona Bay and Day's Bay ...The names of those who escaped are REDIGER and KUSKIE. REDIGER is a tall, well-built man, who, before being interned, posed as a Norwegian. KUSKIE is short and thin; with curly hair, and previously passed himself off as H. J. MORTIMER. Both men were wearing working clothes when they escaped. [WAIRARAPA DAILY TIMES, VOLUME LXIX, ISSUE LXIX, 6 MAY 1915 - The two Germans who escaped on Tuesday night from Somes Island were recaptured yesterday afternoon at Orongorongo by a party of military police.]

DOMINION, VOLUME 8, ISSUE 2470, 25 MAY 1915
The Patriotic Society has received a cheque for £5 from a Mr. A. APRAHAIMAN, vice-president of the Auto Supply Co., New York. Mr. Aprahaiman, who is an American by birth, and an American subject by naturalisation, has just been released from Somes Island, where he was interned as a Turkish subject, but released as soon is the authorities learnt their mistake.

DOMINION, VOLUME 8, ISSUE 2472, 27 MAY 1915
Among the names of the recruits published in Monday's Dominion there appeared the name of a German, fairly well known in Wellington, who was for a while interned on Somes Island. Several men complained to this office of the fact that a prisoner of war, who was on parole, should be allowed to enlist, and stated that they did not feel at all disposed to go forward in any force which might include him. However, this unpleasant position will not arise, for the man has been scored off the list, and will not be allowed to join the forces.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XL, ISSUE 9088, 6 JULY 1915
WANGANUI. Mr Kerr, S.M., gave an interesting judgment to-day in a case under the Destitute Persons Act, ZEMANEK v. ZEMANEK. Complainant, a married woman, who was before her marriage a British subject, applied for an order of maintenance against her husband, an unnaturalised Austrian. It was submitted for the defendant that the court had no jurisdiction, because, since May, 1870, a female British subject becomes an alien by marrying an alien, and that she could not stand in a better position than her husband, who, as an alien enemy, had no rights at common law. The magistrate held that the Destitute Persons Act put the husband under an obligation to maintain his wife, and that such obligation gives the wife a correlative right to such maintenance; further, that a “Gazette” published by the Governor at the outbreak of the war gives all enemy subjects within the Dominion the same rights to sue and plead as other subjects of His Majesty. The application was accordingly granted.
[HAWERA & NORMANBY STAR, VOLUME LXIX, ISSUE LXIX, 21 AUGUST 1915 - PUBLIC NOTICE. THE undersigned, hereby beg to notify the public that my proper name is "J. F. J. ZEMANEK." I am no German. I am a Bohemian-Czech by birth. I myself have been persecuted in this town and accused of being a German spy. The reason for changing my name is that it is inconvenient to have a foreign name in my present occupation. I appeal to the public for fair play. I am prepared to produce my papers before the Mayor, the Stipendiary Magistrate, or the Police for inspection by the public. The Police Authorities have already full knowledge of me and of my past career. I invite the public to make enquiry from them. J. F. J. ZEMANEK, Commonly known as J. F. J. STUART.] [HAWERA & NORMANBY STAR, VOLUME LXIX, ISSUE LXIX, 22 SEPTEMBER 1915 - WARNING. IF certain people will persist in calling me a German, with the object of injuring me in my business, I will be forced to take proceedings against them in Court. J. F. J. ZEMANEK, (Formerly known as "Stuart") Taxi Driver.]

DOMINION, VOLUME 8, ISSUE 2518, 20 JULY 1915
Auckland. On Saturday night a brick was sent crashing through one of the plate-glass windows of the shop of Fowlds, Ltd., in Queen Street, and the man who threw the brick made no attempt to run away, with the result that he was immediately arrested by the first constable who arrived on the scene. The brick had gone clean through the window, making a large but neat hole in the glass, and had then struck and shivered a mirror at the back of the window. The man, who gave his name as George PONGART, aged 39 years, stated that he was a German by birth, and had not been naturalised in New Zealand ... The prisoner here broke in with a request to be sent to Somes Island, where German prisoners were interned. "Everybody seems to be down on me just because the war is on, and won't give me employment. I have been in the King Country, and I was in Palmerston North, where I could not get a job, so I asked the police there to put me on the island, but they would not do it. I would be very much obliged if you would put me there." His Worship stated that the Court had no power to intern the prisoner in that way, but the accused would be sentenced to twenty-one days hard labour, and after he got out he had better go and see the Defence Department about being interned.

WAIRARAPA DAILY TIMES, VOLUME LXIX, ISSUE 14424, 4 NOVEMBER 1915
Says the Wanganui Chronicle: Dame Rumour has been very busy lately concerning Captain Leopold McLAGLAN, the bayonet and ju-jitsu expert. The first rumour, which appeared to have originated in Wellington, was that the captain had been found to be a German spy, and had been interned on Somes Island. This, however, did not suit the lying jade, who was not content until the victim of her slander had been duly shot and ignominiously buried. Meanwhile the captain has been, and still is, carrying on his professional work in Auckland, and occupying comfortable quarters in the Star Hotel.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XLI, ISSUE 9264, 3 FEBRUARY 1916
It was recently stated publicly that a German woman who has two brothers in America had been supplied with a passport and allowed to leave for America, This matter has been the subject of inquiry by the Women’s Anti-German League, and correspondence which has passed between the league and the military authorities on the subject has been handed to us for publication. We append the letters hereto. The first letter was from the league to Colonel-Gibbon, Chief of the General Staff, dated January 22nd, as follows: - "Could you give the league any information as to when Martha GROSSE left the Dominion and by whom assisted, she being an unnaturalised German subject? She having lived in the house of Dr Christie for two years, he should be able to supply the necessary information. We look on this as an important matter, and would, be obliged if you would reply to this at once.(Signed) E. J. Moore, Hon. secretary." To this Colonel Gibbon replied on January 24th: - "I have to inform you that Miss Martha Grosse was, under the powers granted to the Hon. Minister for Defence by the war regulations, given a permit to leave the Dominion." In reference to this reply, the league has been advised that the war regulations give no power whatever to the Minister for Defence to permit an unnaturalised alien to leave the Dominion. Since that letter was received the league's secretary has sent the following to Colonel Gibbon: "I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, for which I thank you, and would further deem it a favour if you would supply the date of the departure of Martha Grosse. Also the date of the permit granted by Mr Allen, Defence Minister, and the boat she left in." No reply to this letter has yet been received by the league.

EVENING POST, VOLUME XCI, ISSUE 33, 9 FEBRUARY 1916
In connection with the case of F. W WOLTERS, a naturalised German, who has been for some time a resident of Wellington, and who came into prominence recently as the principal figure in a disturbance among French Reservists who were visiting here, correspondence now in the possession of the Prime Minister shows that he was naturalised in 1906; that he has obtained his New Zealand degree of Master of Arts; and that he applied to the Internal Affairs Department for a passport to enable him to go to Switzerland to sit for an examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in April, but was refused. He then applied to the Attorney-General and was informed by the latter that he could not possibly interfere. Since then Wolters had been in communication with the Prime Minister to achieve the same purpose, and was again informed, that in the present state of affairs there could be no interference with the decision previously communicated to him. In his communications with the Prime Minister Wolters claimed that he was a loyal subject of Britain. At present Welters is at Somes Island. For some time he worked in the Government Printing Office, but not during the last year or two.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3236, 22 MARCH 1916
It is understood that Mr A. D. Thomson (Assistant Public Service Commissioner) will be given a commission to conduct an inquiry on behalf of the Government into certain statements that have been made regarding the nationality of Lieutenant Alexander Hugh GRIERSON, a member of the 10th Reinforcements. The proceedings, which will be public, will be opened shortly, and the persons who have made allegations will be given an early opportunity to produce their evidence. [POVERTY BAY HERALD, VOLUME XLIII, ISSUE 13967, 13 APRIL 1916 - THE GRIERSON ENQUIRY. ALLEGATIONS DISMISSED. THE COMMISSIONER'S OPINION. The report of Mr A. D. Thomson, who was appointed a commissioner to investigate certain allegations against Lieutenant Grierson, has been made public. The Commissioner returns the answer "No" to each of the questions in the order of reference, which read: - (1) Whether one Alexander Hugh Grierson is or at any time has been German, Austrian, or other enemy nationality? (2) Whether he is of German, Austrian or other enemy descent? (3) Whether there is any reason to suspect him of disloyalty to His Majesty or of any enemy connections which render inadvisable his retention as an officer of the Expeditionary Forces? After traversing the evidence taken at the inquiry, the Commissioner says he is satisfied that Grierson's fellow lodgers came to a wrong conclusion in suspecting Grierson to be German or partly German in blood, but the Commissioner does not agree with Grierson's contention that he did not give grounds for this suspicion. "It is not alleged that in the various discussions referred to, he said anything against the British, but it seems quite clear that he said all he could for Germany in such a way as to rouse hostility to himself. I believe his doing so was only a foolish and boastful airing of his superior knowledge in certain matters, and that he is, nevertheless a loyal British subject."


ALIENS INTERNED. WELL-KNOWN AUCKLAND RESIDENTS AUCKLAND. Three well-known citizens were apprehended today as enemy subjects in the persons of Eugene LANGGUTH (importer, and late Austrian Consul at Auckland), Gustav KRONFELD (importer), and William Henry DUERKOP (indent agent). The three men were placed under detention this morning by Detectives Hollis and Powell, and were conveyed to Fort Takapuna, where they will be temporarily interned. It is understood that they will later be sent to either Motuihi or Somes Island. The police state that there has been no development that they are aware of. Inspector Sheehan, when seen on the subject, said the police were simply acting on instructions from the military authorities. It appears that the detectives simply called on each of the three person named, and stated that they were to be placed under detention, and would be required to proceed by the afternoon boat to Fort Takapuna. Although on the list of aliens for the last 18 months, neither Mr Langguth nor Mr Kronfeld has been previously placed under, detention. Mr Duerkop, however, was apprehended in Wellington last year in connection with a charge of trading with the enemy.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3241, 26 APRIL 1916
By instructions from the Defence Department, Dr Theodore ENDLETSBERGER, who lived at Epsom, was arrested this afternoon, and handed over the military authorities.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3244, 17 MAY 1916
Two foreigners named I. SCHACK and A. KOMASHKO, purporting to be Russian journalists traveling around the world on foot, and who were recently in Palmerston North, were arrested to-day in Levin under instructions from the military authorities. Both the military and the police officials are extremely reticent regarding the matter, but startling developments are expected in a few days. It appears that the two men were travelling about the country ostensibly for the purpose of gaining material for future articles in the Russian press. Though they had apparently bona fide passports, their action aroused the suspicions of the military authorities, who kept a watch on them. It appears that the men were seen near the Rangiotu camp, and spent the night at a German's place near there. This confirmed the suspicions of the military authorities, with the result that the police were communicated with. The men were brought to the Palmerston Police Station, and were searched. The search did not reveal much of an apparent incriminating character, although a photograph found on one of the men bore the name of a Hamburg photographer. They will be locked up pending the pleasure of the military authorities.

WAIRARAPA DAILY TIMES, VOLUME LXX, ISSUE 14567, 19 MAY 1916
Yesterday morning Eberhard FOCKE, the former German Consul in Wellington, was re-interned on Somes Island, where he spent some time in captivity earlier in the war. The news of his arrest spread very rapidly, and there was an interested little assemblage on the wharf to witness his departure for the island. The launch conveying the prisoner and his guard of three soldiers left about 10 o'clock. The Government has vouchsafed no explanation for the re-internment of the ex-Consul. He was interned on Somes Island for a period soon after the war began, and was subsequently released on the bond of two well-known citizens. It has not yet transpired what has happened, or whether anything at all has happened since then to bring about his re-internment.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3245, 24 MAY 1916
ANTI-GERMAN LEAGUE'S CHARGES. INVESTIGATIONS BY AUTHORITIES.
The Minister of Defence has handed to the press the following details of the career and parentage of allegedly German individuals named by the Anti-German League as included in the New Zealand Defence Forces or otherwise treated with favour by the Government: -
CAPTAIN DR ALFRED BERNSTEIN. This officer is in charge of Te Waikato Sanatorium. He was commissioned in the New Zealand Forces under similar conditions to medical officers so placed i.e., being paid exclusively by the Government. He was born in Yorkshire, where his father's people have been domiciled for at least 120 years. He is a very loyal Britisher, and is greatly respected by leading public and business men of Cambridge. Dr Roberts, of Cambridge, is from the same town as Captain Bernstein, and can substantiate his statements.
LIEUTENANT VERNON CRANLEY BOSSELMAN. Lieutenant Bosselman was born at Nelson on October 21, 1895. His father was a native of Germany and his mother a New Zealander, of British parentage. When Lieutenant Bosselmann was at Nelson College he was recommended by the principal of the College for a Territorial commission, and to take charge of the Cadets. He was confirmed in this appointment on May 12, 1913. This recommendation was approved of under General Regulation 1911, 88 (b). Mr Bosselmann is now at Canterbury College, and at the present time has no connection with the Territorial Force, other than holding his commission.
LIEUTENANT F. L. BUCHLER. Lieutenant Frederick Lancelot Buchler was born in New Zealand. His father was born in England, and also his grandfather, who was a British officer, so that his father's ancestors were in England in the latter part of the eighteenth century, at which time they were known as von Buchler. His mother is of purely English descent. Lieutenant Buchler was appointed an officer on probation on March 14, 1914, and attached to the Stratford High School Cadets Prior to being commissioned, he had served in the School Cadets and the Eleventh Regiment (Taranaki Rifles). This officer bears an excellent character, and is well spoken of by those who were closely associated with him. He left New Zealand with the Ninth Reinforcements.
DOLLING. The statement regarding the DOLLING family is absolutely incorrect. Neither of the brothers has enlisted. Fritz enrolled, but his services were not accepted, as he was born in Germany, although it might be remarked that he arrived in New Zealand when he was only three and a-half years of age. Eric has also not been accepted. Fritz Dolling served for eight years in the Field Artillery. He was thought a great deal of by his commanding officer. He has testimonials from some of the leading citizens in the dominion, and one special recommendation from Mr T. M. Wilford, M.P.
LIEUTENANT ARTHUR AUGUSTUS ELLIS FLOHR. Lieutenant Flohr is an ex-Imperial Army officer. His birth and parentage are well known to the War Office. He is not of alien enemy descent. Mrs Flohr, nee Greenaway, is a daughter of well-known New Zealand people, who are Scotch. Lieutenant Flohr entered Trentham camp on March 17, 1915 as a non-commissioned officer on probation. He was promoted second lieutenant on probation on June 15, 1915. He was in July and August acting as camp adjutant at Tauherenikau camp. He was not confirmed in his appointment on probation as a second lieutenant.
LIEUTENANT ROBERT MCGREGOR GOLDSMAN. Lieutenant Goldsman was born at Dunedin on March 13, 1886; father, George Goldsman, born Aberdeenshire, Scotland; mother, Jane Goldsman, nee McRae, born Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Lieutenant Goldsman is in camp as lieutenant on probation with the Twelfth Reinforcements.
HAROLD HALLENSTEIN FELS. H. H. Fels was born at Dunedin on May 13 1891. Next-of-kin, Willi Fels, naturalised October 15, 1890. He served for four years in the Volunteers and Territorials. He was a year and a-half in the Otago Hussars.
MARTHA GROSS [or GROSSE]. Miss Martha Gross was permitted to leave the dominion in compliance with an agreement between the British and German Governments that women be not retained. She was engaged as a nurse by Dr Christie when he was in Germany. When Dr Christie left with the New Zealand Forces the agreement was terminated, and this lady could not obtain employment in the dominion. There is no information in the possession of the Defence Department that she could be considered as a paid German spy, nor were there any grounds for suspicion that she was other than a trained and highly qualified nurse.
DR A. S. HERBERT. Dr Arthur Stanley HERBERT (formerly WOHLMANN) was granted a commission in the New Zealand Forces as a captain, New Zealand Medical Corps, on November 19, 1915. It has been ascertained that Dr Herbert's great-great-great-grandfather was a British subject, born in London, England, and his descendants have all been British subjects. In June, 1915, Sir Francis Bell, who was then Minister of Internal Affairs, consented to his changing his name from Wohlmann to Herbert.
CAPTAIN C. A. HERMAN. Captain Cedric Arthur HERMAN is a native of New Zealand. His father is also a native of New Zealand, and his mother is of purely Irish descent. It is understood his grandfather on the father's side was a German. Captain Herman was appointed a second-lieutenant on April 4, 1911, and, prior to being commissioned, he had served in the Christ's College Cadets, and had done 15 months training with the Canterbury College Officers' Training Corps. He came into camp with and proceeded to the front with the Seventh Reinforcements. There was some talk in Auckland of certain statements made by Captain Herman at a supper party, but on investigation it turned out to be not worth taking notice of.
LIEUTENANT IVAN HIRSCHBERG. Lieutenant Ivan Hirschberg was commissioned in the New Zealand Territorial Forces in August, 1912. He had previously served eight years in the cadets. He was born in Masterton, his father being William James Hirschberg, law clerk, who was born in Greytown on April 8, 1860, and whose father was Montz Hirschberg, a German, who arrived in New Zealand at an early age and settled in the Wairarapa. He married Miss Jane Hall at St. Peter's Church, Wellington, on January 29, 1858. Lieutenant Hirschberg sailed with tho Eighth Reinforcements.
CAPTAIN F. R. HOTOP. Captain Francis Rudolph HOTOP was appointed an officer in the New Zealand Medical Corps on December 1, 1915. He is a native of New Zealand, his father being Ludwig Hotop, a German, and a chemist of Queenstown, who has been resident in the dominion for some 50 years, having arrived at the age of 15. His mother was of purely British descent. Mr Hotop bears an excellent reputation in the Queenstown district, and is considered a loyal British subject. He has been Mayor of Queenstown on several occasions, is a justice of the peace, and is coroner for the district. Mr Payne stated that it is alleged Captain Hotop has two brothers in the German army. It is therefore well to say that Dr Hotop is the only surviving son, his brother having died some years ago in Sydney. Captain Hotop since he came to Trentham camp has been performing excellent services, is a first rate officer, and his loyalty has not been doubted. This file was placed before Cabinet on March 30 who minuted it "No action at present."
SON OF JOOSTEN, EX-GERMAN CONSUL, CHRISTCHURCH. Jooston was married on June 5 1907, and his eldest son is five years of age. There is, therefore, no son of this man in the Expeditionary Force. It might be remarked that Jooston is only 35 years of age.
KEMNITZ. The only Kemnitz that can be found having any connection with the Territorial Force is the clerk of the court at Invercargill. This gentleman was appointed second-lieutenant in the Senior Cadets on November 28, 1912. Prior to this appointment he was for four years a sergeant in the Waitaki Boys' High School Cadets. His father and grandfather were born in Australia.
LIEUTENANT A. E. KRETSCHMAR. Lieutenant Alfred Edward KRETSCHMAR is a native of New Zealand, of German parentage. His parents arrived in 1851, and were naturalised on June 24, 1862, prior to the birth of Lieutenant Kretschmar. They have not been out of New Zealand since their arrival. Lieutenant Kretschmar served for seven years in the Volunteers, and was commissioned as a cadet officer on September 7, 1910. He is at present on the reserve of officers, and is actively employed by the Defence Department. He is looked upon as a loyal British subject.
CAPTAIN LANGGUTH. Captain Werner Eugene LANGGUTH is a natural born British subject, and had to do his compulsory training the same as any other British subject. He is at present on extended leave of absence. He has not been engaged at the forts since September, 1914. He entered Walsh brothers' flying school with a view of going to India and offering his services as a pilot, but he was informed that he could not be recommended on account of his parentage.
LIEUTENANT LORENZ WILFRED MEULI. Lieutenant L. W. Meuli was born at Manaia, Taranaki, on June 20, 1891. He was granted a commission as second-lieutenant, unattached list (b). on March 25, 1912, and was appointed to the Manaia Cadets. Previous to being commissioned he had served five years in the College Cadets and one year in the Mounted Rifles. His parents are Swiss. One of the family, who was particularly well-known throughout the dominion as a footballer, was killed at Gallipoli. Lieutenant Meuli sailed with the Eleventh Reinforcements.
LIEUTENANT CHARLES HENRY HOLTZEN. This officer is a member of the Post and Telegraph Services. He is a native of New Zealand, his father being the late inspector of public works in Southland district. His father was a Dane, and born near Copenhagen. His mother was Miss Suckling, a member of a very old English family hailing from Essex, England. Lieutenant Holtzen's father had fought against the Germans in 1863. and it has been a well-known fact that Lieutenant Holtzen himself has always had a deep objection to the German nation, and has expressed such views so long back as 15 years.
SERGEANT-MAJOR. C. H. RITZEMA. Sergeant-major Charles Hodgson RITZEMA was born in tho British army. His ancestors have resided in England for hundreds of years. This non-commissioned officer fought throughout the South African war with the British regiments. He was accepted on the instructional staff of the New Zealand Forces shortly after compulsory training came into force. This non-commissioned officer's father had retired from the army when the present war broke out, he having completed 28 years service and reached warrant rank. He, however, again rejoined the British forces, and was killed in action on the Western front. Sergeant-major Ritzema's oldest brother was wounded at the Dardanelles, and again rejoined his company, and is since believed to have been killed in action. His only other brother is an officer with the Regular Forces, and is at present on active service. Sergeant-major Ritzema states he was well aware of the interest the Women's Anti-German League took in him, and that he had to submit to a good deal in Napier and Hastings. He could have given information that would have cleared him in the eyes of the public, for he was in possession of letters from the War Office, but he considered it was his duty as a British soldier to treat his calumniators with silent contempt.
CAPTAIN J. F. ROCKSTROW. Captain John Frederick ROCKSTROW was born in New Zealand. He saw service in tho South African war. His father was born in Germany, but had been many years in New Zealand, having arrived in 1862, and was naturalised before his marriage. His mother was an English woman of English parentage. He is employed in clerical duties in the examination branch of tho Headquarters Training Staff. His case was put before the Aliens' Commission, and the recommendation was that he should continue in his present employment.
S. F. SCHANK. Temporary Sergeant-major Samuel Freddy SCHANK was appointed as an instructor in Trentham camp on October 24, 1914. He was born in Australia. His parents were Swiss. They arrived in Now Zealand 45 years ago.
LIEUTENANT FRANZ SCHERF. Lieutenant Franz SCHERF arrived in Now Zealand as an ensign with the British Forces about 1850. Ho was commissioned as a lieutenant in New Zealand in 1866. He served through the Maori war. It has recently been learnt that he died six years ago, but as no notification of his death was received by the Defence Department, his name continued to appear in the New Zealand Army List as being in the Reserve of Officers.
LIEUTENANT J. C. SCHNEIDER. Lieutenant Jonathan Charles SCHNEIDER was appointed a lieutenant on probation in the New Zealand Railway Battalions on July 7, 1913. He was born at the Hinds, Canterbury, on February 26, 1881. His father was a German and his mother an English woman. Lieutenant Schneider is a clerk in the Railway Department, and bears an excellent character.
CAPTAIN W. J. A. SCHWARTZ. Captain William John Augustus SCHWARTZ is a New Zealander by birth. He was a keen Volunteer, and was elected a lieutenant in the Ashburton Guards Rifles on September 9, 1902, and captain on June 17. 1903. His parents were Danes. This officer bears an excellent character. He is at present on the Reserve of Officers [aka William Augustus John MATHIESON].
KRUTZER. Krutzer is Major Daniel James SWEETZER, late of the Imperial army. This officer's ancestors have resided in England for many hundreds of years. The home of the family is now at Oak Villa, Mortimer, Berkshire, where his family has been domiciled for over two hundred years.
SON OF SEEGNER, EX-GERMAN CONSUL, AUCKLAND. Seegner has no family, it is therefore impossible for a son to be in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force.
MAJOR E. TEICHELMANN. Major Ebenezer TEICHELMANN was born in Adelaide on March 23, 1859. His father was a German missionary, and his mother a Scotch woman. He was educated in Australia and England, and is a F.R.C.S., England. He joined the Australian Forces on May 25, 1892, and on his coming to New Zealand he joined the Westland Rifle Volunteers about February, 1900. He had not been to Germany prior to the year 1912, when he passed through the country on his way to England The Imperial Government asked for the services of surgeons from New Zealand. Major Teichelmann was recommended, his services were accepted, and he left the dominion on August 26, 1915.
VOGHTHERR [?]. This man was discharged from the New Zealand Expeditionary Force as soon as it was learnt that his father and mother were not naturalised. On his discharge being handed to him he informed Colonel Adams that he was recruited by the Patriotic Society of Hastings, who told him it was quite right for him to join the Expeditionary Force, and that his loyalty was not doubted.
LIEUTENANT RONALD VOLCKMAN. Lieutenant. Ronald Volckman was born in New Zealand. He was gazetted second lieutenant on February 5, 1912. Prior to receiving his commission he had served in the College Cadets and Territorials for four years. It has not been possible to ascertain the nationality of this officer's ancestors on the father's side, beyond that his father was born in London and his mother in Northampton. Colonel Chaffey and Colonel Millton have known Lieutenant. Volckman from infancy. Colonel Millton states that he has known Lieutenant Volckman's father for 20 years, and that he is absolutely loyal and decidedly anti-German, and has been so at all times. Lieutenant Volekmann is at present in the 8th (South Canterbury) Mounted Rifles.
CAPTAIN F. W. VOSSELER. Frederick William Gustave VOSSELER was born in Wellington in 1878. He joined the Garrison Artillery as a lieutenant in October, 1912. His parents were both born in Germany, and have been naturalised in New Zealand. The senior officers of the Wellington Garrison Artillery Division are quite satisfied regarding tho loyalty of this officer, and are confident that his entire sympathies are with Great Britain and her allies. He is at present on extended leave for the period of the war.
LIEUTENANT WASS. Lieutenant Wass is on Imperial Army officer, and is on loan to the New Zealand Government until the end of the war. He was on the outbreak of war, one of the senior warrant officers of the Army Service Corps, having 23 years' service. He is now on active service attached temporarily to the New Zealand Forces.
STAFF SERGEANT H. F. WIECHERN. Sergeant Harold Frederick Theodore WIECHERN was born in Nelson on August 20, 1887. His was a German and his mother an Englishwoman. He was appointed to the New Zealand Permanent Staff as an instructor on May 12, 1912. He is at present employed as area sergeant-major, Wellington. There has been no reason to doubt his loyalty.
E. WOLLEBMAN. Ernest WOLLERMAN is a native of New Zealand. His parents are German. His father arrived in New Zealand in the early seventies and was naturalised on October 12, 1886. Lieutenant Wollerman is employed as military censor in Samoa. The Administrator considers that he has rendered very valuable service to the Empire, being the means of bringing to light various German methods of evading censorship, etc., in Samoa whilst in British military occupation. His case was placed before the Aliens' Commission, who, having received the statements of the Administrator of Samoa, decided that it would be in the interests of the Empire to retain him in his present appointment.
COLONEL G. C. B. WOLFE. Colonel George Cecil Burleigh WOLFE is a son of Major-general James Wolfe, late of the Imperial Army and late British Commissioner of Basutoland. He was born at Plymouth, England, and educated at Maramead School, Plymouth, and the Royal Naval College, Greenwich. He was first appointed to the Royal Marine Artillery, and was subsequently transferred to the Royal Marine Light Infantry. Served in Channel and Mediterranean Squadrons. Retired in 1897 with rank of captain. He was then gun commander of H.M.S. Theseus. He joined New Zealand Forces in 1900, and was appointed to command Nelson military district. Has subsequently held following appointments: - Officer commanding Auckland military district, adjutant-general and inspector drill halls and rifle ranges. The latter appointment he is still holding.

EVENING POST, VOLUME XCI, ISSUE 140, 14 JUNE 1916
Recently Mr. Payne (Grey Lynn) asked the Minister of Defence why a man named Eder was released from Somes Island to go back to his employment at the Foxton Cordage Company, where he was engineer, and where he is still filling that position. The Hon. Mr. Allen, Minister o£ Defence, has replied that Ludwig EDER was arrested and interned on 10th August, 1914, and released on 2nd September, 1914, the necessary bond for his good behaviour being signed by Messrs. Alexander Ross and George Henry Stiles, of Foxton. There was no question as to what occupation he would follow on his release, but Mr. Ross guaranteed to find Eder employment and he was also prepared to enter into a bond for whatever amount the authorities might demand. Eder was kept strictly to the terms of his parole. In this case consideration was given to the position of Eder's wife and five children, British-born subjects, who were without money and would have become a charge upon the State.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XLI, ISSUE 9360, 27 MAY 1916
GERMANS ENLISTING - To the Editor "N.Z. Times." Sir - Men of German extraction are enlisting with every Reinforcement. This should be at once stopped, its nothing less than criminal. Here are a few reasons why Germans should not beach allowed to enlist.
1/ At Gallipoli a gun of ours was turned on a number of our men, and they got badly cut up, some were killed, some had to have limbs amputated, and others were wounded. At first it was said to be a mistake, but was it ? Who was in charge of this gun? Why, a German, of course. The truth is now leaking out; this was not a mistake as far as the German was concerned. This is not the only instance, it has happened in other places as well.
2/ Wrong orders are sometimes given to our boys by Germans amongst our men. Our boys are sometimes told to charge when they should be under cover - result, dozens are killed or wounded. Where did those Germans come from? How did they get amongst our boys, etc? They are leaving Non Zealand by every troopship. We are paying them to go and kill our boys. 3/ Some of our boys are wounded in the back and could only have been fired at from behind. Who is to say when a man is lying down with a rifle if it is pointed at friend or foe when both are in front? Sometimes if the rifle is moved an inch one way or the other, friend or foe could be hit. These wounds must be inflicted by foes in our ranks.
4/ Germans are amongst the missing at the front, probably they walked over to the German trenches with information gathered in New Zealand. The Censor is a farce when Germans are allowed to take information to their country in this simple fashion. Why, Germans are photographing our men in camp, and the camps, marching through the streets, going on board ship, and anything and everything they like, quite openly in broad daylight. What are the Government thinking of? If this occurred in Germany they would be marched out and shot, as has already been done. 5/ In Australia not so long ago, men were dying in a hospital at such a rate that the matter was looked into. Result: A German doctor was in charge, and, I understand, German nurses were there also. Here in New Zealand we are enlisting German doctors and nurses. I could point out over two dozen Government mistakes, but the above are the most serious, and want attending to at once.
There are numerous instances in civilian life where men will not work with Germans, but the Government expect us to enlist with them. I know numbers who will not enlist because of this, and they cannot be blamed, knowing what is going on. They are not going to be butchered by German doctors, etc., etc. If the Government wants us to enlist, let them recall all Germans. If they are fit to fight, they should be on Somes Island. We all know that there may be a small percentage of Germans that are fighting for us, but why should we be made to suffer because of these few? It is only fair to protect our boys and put all Germans on Somes Island, recall the lot-and intern them. Blood is thicker than water, and I do not blame the Germans for helping their own country by enlisting here, but I do blame the Government for allowing such a thing. It is most disgraceful. Numbers to whom I have spoken will not enlist until the Government rectify this. It is this that is keeping a lot of Wellington men back from enlisting, waiting for the Government to see their mistake; but I think we might wait in vain, hence the above. I am not writing the above to discourage enlistment, but to help out comrades at the front, and rectify things here, so that others will go.
Again, if the Government do their duty and protect us and those we leave behind properly, there will not be any need for conscription. If the country is worth fighting for, then pay for it, and do not starve those who are dependent on the boys at the front. For the present I sign myself, 773H.

EVENING POST, VOLUME XCI, ISSUE 142, 16 JUNE 1916
A case of aggravated cruelty to a horse came before the Magistrate's Court to-day, the defendants being two young Germans, named Albert Arthur CRELL and Heinrich GOEDECKE. Crell is a wood-cutter residing at Belmont, while Goedecke was employed by him as a driver. The police evidence showed that the horse in question, when seen by Inspector Henry, S.P.C.A., had ringbone on both forefeet, both knees were broken, there was a sore on the off shoulder under the collar, and one on the neck under the top of the collar. There was also a large, sore on the withers under the saddle. The animal was very old and emaciated, and it was gross cruelty to even allow it to live. The Magistrate, imposed a fine of £3, with costs, default being fixed at fourteen days imprisonment. The accused asked for time to pay the amount, but Inspector Hendrey stated that this would be of no use, as both men were shortly to be interned on Somes Island.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XLI, ISSUE 9382, 22 JUNE 1916
In the House of Representatives yesterday Dr Thacker (Christchurch East) asked the Minister in Charge of the Tourist and Health Resorts Department whether he intended to dispense with the services of Tony FALKENBACH, the official motor tourist agent at Hokitika, who is an unnaturalised German? Dr Thacker added that tourists have already refused to travel with Falkenbach, and that a motor agent in Hokitika named Dowell, who has two sons at the front, gets no official work. The Hon. Dr McNab replied: "As I stated on the 24tn ultimo, in answer to the honourable member for Grey Lynn, the firm of Falkenbach Limited is not, nor has it ever been, agent for the Department of Tourist and Health Resorts. The statement that Dowell Bros, get no business through my department is not correct. The only cases where the department extends preference to any passenger-carrying firm is where a firm is a contractor for conveyance of mails; and as neither of the firms mentioned are mail contractors, the patronage they secure through the official booking system is governed by the desires or wishes of the department's clients. Dr Thacker said it appeared that Falkenbach was not an agent of the Tourist Department, but that the Tourist Department was the agent of Falkenbach. In a letter Falkenbach stated that some four years ago he made arrangements with the department to act as his agents and paid them ten per cent for all tickets sold. That looked as if there was a close connection between the department and this unnaturalised firm. He thought the department should absolutely cut adrift from him.
ENEMY ALIEN'S SHOP CLOSED. The reply I gave on June 14th fully covers this question, was the printed reply given in the House yesterday by the Hon. J. Allen to a question asked as to whether the police have reported that Jacques SCHLOSS ought to be interned ...
The alleged absconding of an enemy alien was referred to in the House by Mr J. Payne (Grey Lynn), who asked the Minister for Defence (l) Whether one Carl WAGNER was released from Somes Island under bond. (2) Did he break bond and get safely away to America by the San Francisco steamer? (3) Who was the bondsman, and has he forfeited the bond-money?" The Hon. J. Allen replied: "Carl Wagner was released from Somes Island on parole on September 2nd, 1914. He reported to the police up to January 23rd, 1915, since which date he has not been seen or heard of by the police or military authorities. He was not released under a bond
LOYALTY UNDOUBTED. Harold Horace KUMMER of Masterton, accompanied the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. He is a native of New Zealand, a man of sterling character, and whose loyalty is undoubted, was the Hon. J. Allen's reply yesterday to the member for Grey Lynn's question - Whether he will inquire into the case of Wilhelm Kummer of Masterton, a man alleged to be a German, and who is said to have been allowed to go away in our Expeditionary Forces; and whether he will bring this man back if he finds Kummer is an undesirable, and especially undesirable to place on French soil?

NORTHERN ADVOCATE, 24 JUNE 1916
We ("Northern Advocate") have felt it our duty to make some enquiries about Dr Leopold Keith Kleimen HAGEN. We are informed that he was born in London 37 years ago. Our informant goes on to say "Dr. Hagen's father was actually born in Germany but went to England when a young man. He started business and is still carrying on his busines at the present moment (needless to say he was naturalised 50 years ago). Dr. Hagen was educated at St. Paul's school (one of the largest public schools in England). He then matriculated at the London University and from then on started his medical studies at St. Mary's (Paddington). He finished his medical education in Germany, going for his vacations and doing post-graduate work at his old hospital in Paddington. Our correspondent adds "How the fact of his being these five years in Germany can make him a German remains with such men as his accusers to prove. At the present time Dr. Hagen has several members of his family fighting in various terrier regiments. It appears that the father of Mrs Hagen (who, by the way, was also educated in Germany) was an Imperial army officer, Lieut.Col. Christie. Of his three sons to-day one (Major E. L. Christie) was recently killed after being mentioned in despatches for gallant conduct. Another (Lieut. J. Christie) was in May last recovering from wounds, whilst the third son (Private Arthur Christie) has been invalided back to Australia. In view of these facts Dr. Hagen claims that they indicate the present actions as representing malicious prosecution.

DOMINION, VOLUME 9, ISSUE 2824, 15 JULY 1916
REPORTED MISSING: NIMOT, Private William Powell. Next-of-kin, Mrs. Annie Nimot, sen., Carterton (mother). [EVENING STAR, ISSUE 16205, 29 AUGUST 1916 - The Minister of Defence still declines to make public the name of the New Zealander who deserted to the enemy on the west front. He states that he wishes to secure full information from the Army authorities before he places the details before the public. It is commonly reported in the city on thoroughly good authority that the name of the deserter is NIMOT (pronounced NIMMO). The parents of the man spelled their name as NIMMODT. That he was of German origin is not denied. The man enlisted at Wairarapa, and the fact that he had German blood in his veins was not suspected during his training period.] [DOMINION, VOLUME 9, ISSUE 2865, 1 SEPTEMBER 1916 - The reported desertion to the enemy of a member of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force is now officially stated not to have been a case of desertion at all. In fact the man in question, Private P. Nimot, of Carterton, is officially reported to be a prisoner of war, along with five other Now Zealanders, at Dulmp, Westphalia, in Germany. Circumstantial report have been circulated in New Zealand to the effect that this man went over to the enemy, and betrayed his comrades. That news is not official. The other news that has come to the Defence Minister, that Nimot is a prisoner of war, is official> In view of the circumstances the Minister of Defence has cabled Home, ordering a thorough investigation and a report. Until that report is available judgment may be suspended. It should be understood that information concerning prisoners of war is collected by the agents of the Legations of neutral Powers, usually by the American Legations, and by them distributed to the belligerent Governments.] [WANGANUI HERALD, VOLUME L, ISSUE 15047, 21 OCTOBER 1916 - Some weeks ago the special correspondent of the Christchurch Evening News sent out particulars of the treachery of a New Zealand soldier - happily of alien birth - who escaped from our front line trenches to those of the enemy and gave information which led to a rather disastrous bombardment of our headquarters and trenches. The traitor, as I suppose is well known in New Zealand now, was a soldier named Nimot, from Wairarapa; and it was supposed that he had weighed the costs and decided that he could be happy for the rest of his life amongst the Teutons from whom one of his parents had sprung. But evidently all this was not quite so well thought out. Within the last day or two the High Commissioner's office has received a few more names of New Zealanders who have had the misfortune to become prisoners in German hands. Whenever such information leaks through to the War Office, through several different channels, it is transmitted without comment to the unit or the overseas High Commissioner interested, in order that they may put their records right and and look after the welfare of the captives as much as possible. The name that came through this week was simply "Carterton," described as of the "New Zealand Infantry." Private "Carterton" stood a very good chance of having comforts sent to him in due course at the expense of the New Zealand Government; but unfortunately for him the High Commissioner's office, in a perfectly natural manner, sent to the New Zealand Headquarters to ascertain the full name, rank, and unit of "Mr Carterton." He could not be traced at all. Even this might not have been considered a proper ground for withholding help if it were needed; but unfortunately again for the captive, the High Commissioner's office received an intimation the same afternoon from the Prisoner of War Help Bureau that help was sought for a New Zealander called "Nimot," who was interned at a certain camp of prisoners of war in Germany. What will happen now remains to be seen. The matter will, of course, be referred to the New Zealand Government for a decision. In the meantime it is interesting to find that the ex-resident of Carterton, who had expected some sort of hospitality in his fatherland, is being treated there not as a guest at all, but evidently as a common British prisoner of war; so his outlook for decent amenities is not brilliant.] [FEILDING STAR, VOLUME XIII, ISSUE 3239, 12 MAY 1917 - Soldiers who have lately returned from France give definite details of the desertion of the North Island soldier Nimot (says the Southland News). On the morning after Nimot's disappearance, a German soldier was discovered hiding in a shell-hole, and was brought into the New Zealand lines. He stated that he had been reconnoitring on the previous night with an officer, who told him to get into the shell hole and await his return. The officer, however, did not return. The New Zealanders knew that the opposing Germans were very anxious to find out their numbers and all details concerning the disposition of the troops, and they drew the conclusion that the German officer had come across Nimot, who had been escaping over No Man's Land to join the enemy, and was so delighted at meeting him that he left his soldier comrade to get along as best he could and returned with Nimot to the German lines. A day or two later the New Zealanders captured another German soldier, and after he had been examined it was placed beyond doubt that the deductions of the New Zealanders were absolutely correct. Moreover, the fact that Nimot had given the enemy full information regarding the disposition of the lines of the New Zealanders was fully demonstrated by the manner in which the German gunners commenced to shell important positions.]

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XLI, ISSUE 9407, 21 JULY 1916
In the House yesterday Mr J. Payne (Grey Lynn) asked the Minister for Defence (l) Whether he is responsible for allowing a German Army reservist to leave Somes Island to take up employment with Benjamin Martin GUBB of Port Albert, Auckland district, on account of which action four Justices of the Peace and 117 settlers in the district signed notice convening a meeting to protest against the military authorities of New Zealand allowing German prisoners of war to leave the internment camps and fill the places of men who had gone to fight in the interests of the Empire.(2) Has he recalled this German to the internment camp in order that the work available at Mr Gubb's may be open for some returned soldier, as the resolution of the meeting mentioned herein recommended? The reply given by the Hon. J. Allen was I gave my consent to a prisoner of war being allowed to leave the internment camp and take employment with Mr Gubb, of Port Albert. The prisoner of war was returned to the internment camp on May 25th last. The releasing of prisoners of war from internment camps to accept work from private employers is carried out in the United Kingdom. The last reports which I have, seen that were placed before the House of Commons state that the British prisoners of war in Germany are being similarly treated. Most of them have taken employment on farms, and they are well treated, living under the same roof as their employers and dining with them. The average pay is one mark a day.
CARL SEEGNER AGAIN. Mr J. Payne (Grey Lynn) asked the Minister for Defence (1) Whether he has been made aware that although Mr Carl SEEGNER, the ex-German Consul at Auckland, has been released from Motuihi Island on the plea that he is suffering from diabetes, he is not too sick to shake his fist at ladies residing in St. Stephen's avenue, Parnell, intimidating them because they have taken a prominent part in the Auckland Anti-German League and whether he thinks it is a right thing to allow this Hun to be at liberty to intimidate British women, on the plea that he is sick, whilst, as a matter of fact, there is nothing wrong with him which would prevent his continued detention on the island and (2) does be think that this is right, after the way in which the Germans are treating British prisoners of war in Germany? The Hon. J, Allen replied From inquiries made into this matter, it is found that there was little in it. The ladies stated that Seegner shook his fist at them whilst he was under escort and prior to his release. Several other accusations made against Seegner and the police have proved to be without the slightest foundation. The medical officers certificates testifying to the ill-health of Mr Seegner have been laid on the table of the House.
THE CASE OF DR MANDL. A question asked in the House yesterday of the Minister for Defence by Mr J. Payne (Grey Lynn) was whether it is true that all Defence Department's work of examining recruits is being given to Dr Charles Leopold MANDL at Foxton, whose father is alleged to be an Austrian, and why that work is not given to Dr Kerr Hislop, who has two sons fighting at the front. To this the Hon. J. Allen replied Dr Mandl is a native of Hokitika. His father was born in Austria, and is a naturalised British subject, who has been a resident of New Zealand for over sixty years. Dr Mandl's mother was born in Edinburgh of Scotch extraction. It is not true that Dr Mandl has the sole monopoly as regards the examination of recruits.

EVENING POST, VOLUME XCII, ISSUE 97, 21 OCTOBER 1916
... The enquiries show that a circular from the Workers University Direct Action Group, Auckland Headquarters, and signed by W. Bull, J. NEITZ, and J. Fillop, was published fully twelve months ago, and that one of the signatories Neitz - is a German now interned on Somes Island.

DOMINION, VOLUME 10, ISSUE 2945, 4 DECEMBER 1916
PRISONERS OF WAR. THIRTY-EIGHT GERMANS ARRIVE FROM PAPEETE. NOW ON SOMES ISLAND. Germany was pretty well established all over the Pacific Ocean. Not only was Germany tho possessor of the richer part of Samoa, but in the ramifications of her trade she was a decided influence in Tonga, held valuable territory in New Guinea, and even in distant Tahiti the emissaries of the Fatherland were solidly established. A sample of Germany's settlers in French-owned Tahiti was given on the arrival of the Moana here from San Francisco via Papeete and Rarotonga on Saturday morning. The authorities at Papeete had deemed it wise in the interest of good government to intern many of the German planters and traders in the Islands, and to make them completely immune from any possibility of creating trouble they were sent on by the Moana, and are at present prisoners of war on Somes Island. They may be sent on to Noumea or on to Sydney... Three women also came to Wellington with the prisoners, but are being allowed to stay in the city.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3288, 21 MARCH 1917
Somewhat unusual circumstances attended the death of a German prisoner of war at the Wellington Hospital. The deceased was admitted to the institution on Tuesday week from Somes Island suffering from appendicitis, and was operated on. Later he became delirious, and during one night he got out of bed and attacked one of the nurses. Attracted by the noise several persons rushed to the nurse's assistance, and secured the prisoner, who was put back to bed. The nurse was not much hurt, but had her nerves badly shaken. The prisoner gradually sank and died.

EVENING POST, VOLUME XCIII, ISSUE 110, 9 MAY 1917
The funeral of A. RHODE, a German, who was interned on Somes Island, took place yesterday in Wellington. Deceased had suffered from heart disease for a considerable time, and succumbed on Sunday last. [Death not registered]

EVENING POST, VOLUME XCIII, ISSUE 126, 28 MAY 1917
A mild sensation was caused in the city on Saturday, when a rumour went round to the effect that Dr. Von DANNEVILLE, of the Lahmann Health Home, Miramar, had been taken across to Somes Island and interned for the duration of the war. Unlike the many rumours which have been in circulation lately, this report has the advantage of being absolutely correct. Dr. Von Danneville, under the escort of two detectives, was placed on the island on Saturday morning. It is not known why this step was taken, except the fact that she is an alien enemy. Dr Von Danneville attracted considerable attention whenever she appeared in the streets of Wellington, on account of the eccentricity of her dress, which usually consisted of masculine garb (men's hat, collar, coat, cuffs, and boots) with a woman's skirt. Her hair was always close-cropped. The doctor is reputed to be exceptionally clever, and has travelled widely. She was present through several naval engagements in the Russo-Japanese war. [DOMINION, VOLUME 10, ISSUE 3135, 13 JULY 1917 - The Minister of Defence informed a reporter last evening that he had authorised the release on parole of Dr. von Danneville from internment on Somes Island, on condition her friends provide guarantees for her good behaviour. She is being released on account of ill-health.] [Dr H W VON DANNEVILL was on board the Riverina from Wellington to Sydney on the 18 November 1919. New South Wales, Australia, Unassisted Immigrant Passenger Lists, 1826-1922]

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3303, 4 JULY 1917
Our London correspondent writes: While some New Zealand officers were assisting to examine about a thousand German prisoners on the Western front, one of the Huns recognising the New Zealand hat, called out, "Eh, New Zealander. Do you know anybody at Taumarunui?" He spoke perfect English.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XLII, ISSUE 9742, 18 AUGUST 1917
Thirty-eight years residence in Australasia evidently has not had the effect of alienating Christian Frederick Edmund ANDERSON from sympathy with his native land. Anderson was charged with making use of disloyal utterances, and when brought before Mr L. G. Reid, S.M, entered a plea of not guilty. Defendant, who is canvasser for soap, called at Lindsay's, Ltd., boot factory in Woodward street. During the course of conversation, he said, "The German people are higher morally than you. If it should take a hundred years, the German Empire will be established here ... I am not a German, but am a Dane. I do not know what I said, but it was nothing very serious. Anderson was sent to gaol for a month.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3313, 12 SEPTEMBER 1917
Information placed before Parliament today shows ... The daily average number of prisoners is: Somes Island, 269 second class; Motuihi, 24 first class, and 27 1/2 second class; Devonport, 16 second class.

WAIRARAPA DAILY TIMES, VOLUME 43, ISSUE 13399, 16 NOVEMBER 1917
John BLOMQUIST, a middle-aged Russian Finn, was charged at the Masterton Police Court this morning with having made a disloyal statement at Greytown on Saturday by saying, "Germany is going to win this war, and we'll put all you down." Blomquist, who spoke broken English, pleaded guilty... Blomquist said he was not naturalised, and had been in New Zealand six years. He was a Russian Finn. Sergeant Miller said Blomquist had several previous convictions against him for drunkenness, indecency, etc. His Worship warned accused of the seriousness of his offence. On the charge of making a disloyal statement he would be sentenced to one month's imprisonment....

13 December 1917 - Count Felix Graf von LUCKNER and some of his men escaped from Motuihi Island in the Hauraki Gulf, Auckland. On the 10 November 1917, von Luckner had asked the Minister of Defence if four of his men from the SMS Seeadler be transfered from Somes Island to Motuihi, or at least that his leading seaman ERDMAN. The minister thought it not advisable but it appears to have happened. The commander of the camp at Motuihi had a fast motor boat, the Pearl, at his disposal, and on 13 December 1917, Luckner faked setting up a play for Christmas with his men and used his provisions for the play to plan his escape. He and other prisoners seized the Pearl and made for the Coromandel Peninsula. Using a machine gun, Luckner then seized the 90-ton scow Moa and, with the help of a handmade sextant and a map copied from a school atlas, he sailed for the Kermadec Islands, which was a New Zealand provisioning station, with larger ships anchored there. A pursuing auxiliary ship, the Iris, had guessed Luckner's probable destination and caught up with him on 21 December. A year after his mission began, the war finally ended for Felix von Luckner. He spent the remainder of the war in various prisoner of war camps in New Zealand, including Ripapa Island in Lyttelton Harbour, before being repatriated to Germany in 1919.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3330, 9 JANUARY 1918
Carl SEEGEER, German Consul at Auckland until the outbreak of war, was arrested today and conveyed to Motuihi for internment. He was previously interned in February 1916, but on the grounds of ill heath, released in the following June.

EVENING POST, VOLUME XCV, ISSUE 11, 12 JANUARY 1918
Two well-known residents of Wellington were arrested on yesterday and placed as prisoners of war on Somes Island. One of them is Jaques Ernest SCHLOSS, who has been in business in Wellington for a number of years, trading under the name of Lennard and Co., indent agents, Mercer street. Schloss is a German by birth, and arrived in Wellington 27 years ago. The other prisoner is Herman ZOELLER, a commercial traveller. A Press Association message from Christchurch states that Karl JOOSTEN, former German Consul at Christchurch, has been arrested by the police authorities and handed over to the military police. Karl Joosten was taken over to Somes Island this afternoon. Hermann JOOSTEN [Henry Nicolai Christian JOOSTEN], of Karori, brother of Karl Joosten, was also interned on Somes Island yesterday.

FREE LANCE, VOLUME XVII, ISSUE 914, 18 JANUARY 1918
On Friday last Mr Jaques Ernest SCHLOSS, of Wellington (son-in-law of the late Mr Joseph LACHMANN) was a passenger to the internment camp on Somes Island, and along with him went a well-known commercial traveller named Herman Zoeller, who is also an old resident of Wellington. Of course, Mr Schloss was annoyed at his deportation, and in conversation with a civilian acquaintance protested that he was a loyal New Zealander and urged the funny reason that he was not of enemy origin because he was born at Frankfort on Main before the present German Empire was formed. However, he was obliged to admit that he has never been naturalised as a British subject, although he has been for over 80 years in this Dominion. This fact invests his case with strange significance. How is it that while we have been for 3 1/2 years at war with Germany this unnaturalised German has been free to enjoy all the rights of citizenship in Wellington - the seat of Government - while 280 of his less fortunate fellow-countrymen were confined on Somes Island? Under what high influence has he been able so long to remain at liberty? His freedom has been a public scandal here in Wellington. Prior to the war, Schloss traded under the name of Lennard and Co., and dealt largely in chemical goods and drugs.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XLIII, ISSUE 9876, 23 JANUARY 1918
Hermann JOOSTEN of Karori, who was interned on Somes Island last week, is well known at the Bluff. For a number of years Harry Joosten, the name he is better known by, held an important business post at Bluff, and entered considerably into the social life of the port. He afterwards set up in Wellington on his own behalf as an indent agent. His brother Karl, ex-German Consul at Christchurch who is also interned made Bluff his port of destination on leaving Germany. He stopped there for some months with his brother Harry, apparently to become conversant with the English language, before proceeding to Christchurch to enter upon a business career. Harry Joosten is a single man but Karl married a woman of his own nationality who came out to New Zealand to meet him.

EVENING POST, VOLUME XCV, ISSUE 68, 20 MARCH 1918
A German prisoner of war, John Gustsav BLINN, was charged before Mr. W. G. Riddell, S.M., at the Magistrate's Court today with a series of particularly mean thefts. Blinn was brought over from Somes Island and admitted to the hospital for treatment in December last, and took the opportunity of collecting various odds and ends from nurses, patients, and the board itself. The four charges preferred against him are the thefts of a watch valued at 7s 6d, from Norah Holmes, a fountain pen, valued at 2s 6d from Nurse Willis, and a pair of scissors and a pair of forceps, valued at 3s 6d, the property of the Hospital and Charitable Aid Board. The articles were found in his possession, but Blinn pleaded not guilty, and the case was remanded for a week.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XLIII, ISSUE 9943, 12 APRIL 1918
It transpires that the police party which left New Plymouth at the end of laet week to arrest the German, Oscar MENZEL accomplished their task quietly and without hindrance. Mr J. W. Poynton, S.M., Alien Enemies Commissioner, held an inquiry into Monzel's conduct the week before, and as a result a military warrant was issued for the arrest by the Chief of the General Staff. Plainclothes Constable Fitzgibbon and Constables Blaikie and McGregor arrived at Menzel's farm at Waikawau beyond Awakino, on Saturday. They anticipated trouble, as the German had threatened to shoot at least one man in the district. However, there was no one in the house, and on searching the premises the police discovered a Winchester rifle, pea-rifle ,and two fowling-pieces, together with several rounds of ammunition. They also found a quantity of German literature. After some time Menzel came back to the house with another German who had been interned but was released on probation. Menzel, who was immediately arrested by Constable Fitzgibbon, asked for time in which to move some stock, but the police took no chances, and instructed the neighbours to attend to them. The party arrived at New Plymouth on Monday night with their prisoner, who was escorted to Wellington on Tuesday, to be interned on Somes Island.

EVENING POST, VOLUME XCV, ISSUE 122, 23 MAY 1918
A German named Erick Richard Robert TAMNIE, interned on Somes Island, was brought before Mr. W. G. Riddel], S.M., at the Magistrate's Courts yesterday to answer a charge of the theft of an overcoat valued at £4 15s from Herbert SCHUMACHER. Detective-Sergeant Cox, in outlining the facts of the case, said that in May 1913, the complainant and the accused were in tho employ of the Post and Telegraph Department, and were working in the same gang at Waimate. Between the 17th and 22nd May, Tamnie told the complainant that he was going to Christchurch for a few days, and asked for the loan of an overcoat, saying that he would return it in a few days. Accused did not return, and that was the last seen of the coat. Enquiries were made, and it was found that the accused had left New Zealand. He returned to the Dominion soon after the outbreak of war, and was then interned. In 1915 the complainant also left the country with a 1915 reinforcement after a warrant had been issued for Tamnies's apprehension. On 2nd May last, Detective Carney interviewed the accused, who admitted borrowing the coat, but said he fully intended returning it, but had now forgotten what he had done with it. He had also offered to make good the loss of the coat, but had been advised by the military authorities on the island to let it stand over. The Magistrate considered that the case would be met by the payment of £4 15s to the police, who will forward it to the proper quarter.

WAIRARAPA DAILY TIMES, VOLUME 44, ISSUE 13557, 1 JUNE 1918
A German named Charles OLSEN was arrested at Waikanae on Monday, it being alleged that he had made disloyal remarks and failed to report its required by the Act. He is now interned on Somes Island.

WAIRARAPA AGE, VOLUME XXXVIII, ISSUE 11752, 8 JUNE 1918
A German reservist, who has enjoyed his freedom in the Dannevirke district since the war started, and who was pointedly indicted by Cr. H. Graham at a meeting of the Dannevirke Borough Council, when a resolution passed by a public meeting at Napier was being discussed, was apprehended on Tuesday by the local police, acting on instructions, and is to be handed over to the military authorities for internment on Somes Island (states the Dannevirke News). The man's name is George DIBBERN, commonly known by the sobriquet of "German George," and recent enquiries officially and diligently prosecuted showed, we understand, that Dibbern held a commission in the German army.

NEW ZEALAND TIMES, VOLUME XLIII, ISSUE 10010, 29 JUNE 1918
A New Plymouth resident, Gustave Nicholas Metor SUHR has been interned. Suhr was recently before the magistrate at New Plymouth, charged with drunkenness and using obscene language. It was also stated that he had threatened to kill his wife, and that his general conduct and demeanour were anything but gentlemanly. So much so, that the residents of Hine street presented to Sub-Inspector Hutton a petition bearing sixty names, requesting that Suhr should be interned. The petition was forwarded to the authorities, with the result that instructions for the German’s arrest and transfer to Somes Island were sent.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3358, 24 JULY 1918
In the Magistrate's Court to-day Edward Ralph MARTIN, a negro, an American citizen, was charged with failing to notify his change of address under the Regulation of Aliens Act. The defendant had been previously charged with failing to register, but this was withdrawn. When attention was drawn to his omission the defendant explained that he was under the impression that registration was only required from enemy aliens. His counsel said a general misapprehension existed amongst the public that men of the Allied races were not required to register, and remarked that if President Wilson came to this country he would be in the same position as Martin. The magistrate imposed a fine of 10s, and costs.

OTAGO WITNESS, ISSUE 3359, 31 JULY 1918
Considerable interest was attached to an appeal made before the Military Service Board by the Rev. Arthur Appealt on behalf of the Rev. Henrich HOFFMAN (pastor of the Lutheran Church at Marton). The appellant drew attention to the fact that Hoffman had been made a prisoner in Germany after the outbreak of war. He had studied in the Lutheran Seminary in America, and when he was interned in Germany the heads of the Church got into communication with the United States authorities. As a result of representations made by the Ambassador a release was effected on the ground that the internee was to go into the ministry. Appealt further stressed the fact that the Lutheran Church had no connection whatever with the Church of Germany. They were united by ties of doctrine with a small church in Saxony, but the Lutheran communion would have absolutely nothing to do with the State Church of Germany because of its worldiness, its lack of doctrine, and its militarism. Hoffman gave evidence as to having been interned in Germany after the outbreak of war, and he produced his passports, given at the time of his release. He denied that he preached in the German language, and stated that his services were conducted in English. The appeal was adjourned sine die.

WAIRARAPA DAILY TIMES, VOLUME 44, ISSUE 13604, 31 JULY 1918
Some time during the night four interned Germans escaped from Somes Island on a rudely constructed raft, with the evident intention of going to the city side of the harbour. The raft, however, drifted ashore towards Petone, and swamped. One of the men died from exposure. The others landed and were arrested by the civil police. They are now in a weak condition. Later a rudely fashioned sextant was found floating in the vicinity of the landing.

HAWERA & NORMANBY STAR, VOLUME LXXVII, ISSUE LXXVII, 1 AUGUST 1918
SOMES ISLAND ESCAPE. An inquest on the body of Karl August Hugo KOSEL, whose death occurred during an attempt to escape from Somes Island, was held by Mr Riddell, S.M. Kosel was interned in May, 1916, and was believed to have been a fireman. The other escapees were William KNAB, a painter in Christchurch, interned in August, 1914; Karl W. MMERTIN and Alfred KRAUT, sailors. The former was removed from Te Awamutu in March, 1916, and the latter from Dunedin in December, 1914. William Knab gave evidence that they left Somes Island at 10 p.m. on a raft made of three boxes and five oil drums. The night was fairly fine, but there was a slight southerly breeze. There were three tins of stores on the raft, which was propelled by two paddles and two spades. When they had gone about a thousand yards the raft began to sink. The leader (Mertin) said keep on, and they made for a point between Petone and Ngahauranga. Deceased did not complain of exhaustion, but was determined to carry it through. Deceased was a bit thin, and had lost about 401b in weight. Kraut left off paddling about 30 yards from the shore, and Kosel was just paddling, but was so exhausted that he put no weight into it. He was pretty short of breath on reaching the shore. Kraut had to be dragged from the raft. Kosel managed to get out, but was staggering. Kraut was lying across the railway line, and witness managed to remove him. He then went to Kosel, who said: "I am going to the first house I can get to, and no further." Witness intended looking for a house and seeking assistance. About 2 a.m. witness saw two motor cars in the distance, and hailed one and asked the driver to take them to town to stay at some place for the night. He took them in the car, and they were met by a police sergeant, who told the driver to take them to the police station. On arrival at the police station witness stated that they had escaped, and had left Kosel on the beach. Dr Henry gave evidence that death was the result of shock, exposure and exhaustion. Sergeant-Major Moston produced deceased's file, which showed that he was a laborer, 29 years of age. On February 6 last the commandant at Somes Island had reported that Kosel was suffering from asthma, and was receiving the necessary attention. The evidence of the police showed that Constable Jessup went and brought the deceased to the police station, and that deceased died about 4 a.m. A verdict was returned that death was due to exhaustion, brought about while trying to escape on a raft from Somes Island.

DOMINION, VOLUME 11, ISSUE 276, 10 AUGUST 1918
The disappearance of four prisoners from the internment camp at Somes Island was reported yesterday morning. The men were at their quarters at 2 a.m., when the officer-in-charge went the rounds personally. They were missed by the guard shortly after 6 a.m., and warnings were sent to the civil and military police ashore, but up to a late hour last night nothing had been heard of the men. The official description of the four missing prisoners is as follows:
Charles HADLER: About 33 years, height 5ft. 3in., weight 1371b., fair complexion, fair hair, blue- eyes, tattooed both arms and chest, design not known, scar right ear and eye, speaks good English. Arrested in Wellington and interned August 12, 1914. Born in Wismar, Mecklenburg, Schwerin, Germany, and arrested on arrival in New Zealand in the Star of India, on which he was serving as a fireman.
William OTTENG alias BRAUNER: About 29 years, height 5ft. 8 1/2in., weight 1641b., ruddy complexion, brown hair, blue eyes, tattoo design (not describable) on right forearm, speaks good English. Arrested in Wellington August 12, 1914, and interned same day. Born in Koono, Russlaud, Russia. Cook by trade, and was employed at Te Aro Restaurant, Wellington. In New Zealand about a year before internment.
Paul WOLF: 33 years, height 5ft. 7in., dark complexioned, inclined to be swarthy, dark hair, brown eyes, knife scar across face - eye to left ear. Born at Boehum, Westphalen, Prussia. Fireman on Star of India, and arrested on arrival of ship at Wellington on August 12, 1914.
Kurt RABENSTEIN: 21 years, height 5ft. 4in., weight 140lb., sallow complexion, brown hair, grey eyes. Arrested at Woodside, Otago, February 3, 1915, and interned two days later. Says he was a shepherd, but believed to be a seaman. Born in Hanover, and only in New Zealand one month prior to being interned.
Each man was dressed normally in blue or brown denims, with heavy military boots...[The men were all found three days later still on Somes Island inside the barbed wire enclosure - they had hidden under the floor boards.]

FREE LANCE, VOLUME XVIII, ISSUE 947, 5 SEPTEMBER 1918
Postcard designed and drawn by a German prisoner interned on Somes Island. The translation of the wording is Souvenir of the War Prisoners' Camp.

WAIRARAPA DAILY TIMES, VOLUME 44, ISSUE 13713, 14 DECEMBER 1918
Somes Island being required by the Health Department [for quaratine purposes], the German prisoners interned there - some 300 all told, were removed to-day to the Featherston camp, where they will remain until peace is signed. The prisoners, who welcomed the idea of a change, were removed from the island in the steamer Duchess without the public being aware. They were landed at the Petone wharf and marched to the station, where they entrained. They will be railed right to the Featherston Camp and quartered in huts within the barbed wire enclosure.

SUN, VOLUME VI, ISSUE 1637, 14 MAY 1919
The Willochra is due to leave Wellington to-day with about 400 enemy aliens, chiefly Germans, whose repatriation has been ordered. The draft includes some 240 men from the camp at Featherston, and a smaller group from Narrow Neck camp, Auckland. An armed guard will accompany the prisoners on board the Willochra. The prisoners of war, including German officials from Samoa, and the German naval men, headed by Count VON LUCKNER, are being repatriated compulsorily. The conditions of the Armistice place them entirely at the disposal of the New Zealand Government, as representing the Imperial Government. Interned German civilians are in a different position. They cannot be repatriated compulsorily until their fate has been settled under the Peace Treaty. These internees have all been offered free passages to their Fatherland at the expense of the New Zealand Government, and those who have accepted are to be members of the Willochra's draft. The interned Germans who did not consent to repatriation are being retained in custody in New Zealand for the present. The disposal of the remaining interned Germans has received some consideration already. These men, almost without exception, are enemy aliens by sympathy, as well as nationality. They were interned not merely on the grounds of nationality, but because they had given indications of being actively hostile in their attitude towards the British Empire. It is no secret that the New Zealand Government does not wish to retain these elements in the Dominion, and if the terms of the Peace Treaty permit, another batch of deportees may leave New Zealand in about four months time, but a military guard is not likely to be required on that occasion. The signing of the Peace Treaty will not involve the release of the interned German civilians remaining in New Zealand. These men will be retained in military custody pending their final disposal. Some of them want to return to Samoa, where they have business interests.
THE AUCKLAND PARTY. A party of 168 prisoners of war was dispatched for Wellington by special train to-night to join the Willochra en route to Germany. The party comprised 71 German men, three women, 13 children, and 80 Jugoslavs who desire to be repatriated, and one Austrian. The party include Dr SCHULTZ, ex-Governor of Samoa; Count VON LUCKNER, and Lieutenant KIRCHEISS. No crowds gathered to witness the march through Devonport, but small boys took an evident relish in "counting out" the prisoners as they passed.

THOSE ON BOARD THE ss WILLOCHRA 14 MAY 1919 FOR SYDNEY. ON THE 27 MAY, IT SAILED FROM SYDNEY WITH 928 ONBOARD BOUND FOR PLYMOUTH, ENGLAND, AND LATER ROTTERDAM.
THE NON-GERMAN NATIONALITIES WERE TAKEN OFF AT SYDNEY AND TAKEN TO THE HOLDWORTHY INTERNMENT CAMP WHERE THEY WERE HELD FOR ANOTHER FOUR MONTHS.

ALACH Anton On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ALERICH Josif On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ALERICH Toma On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ALLMERITTER Frederick Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ANTONOVICH Grgo On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ANTONOVICH John (Ivan) On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ANTONOVICH Joze On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ANTONOVICH Juri On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ANTONOVICH Mete On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
APPELT Wilholm P Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ARNDT Karl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ARNERICH Ivan On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ARNERICH Marko Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ARNOLD Paul Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BAER Phillip A Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BALLIN Maxillian Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BALTHASER Arnold P Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BEBICH P On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
BEIN Adolf A Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BERCIE Tony Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
BEREICH M On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
BERGER Louis Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
BERMANN Theodor Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BIBICH Ivan Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
BILAC (AL SANKEY) George Borcich Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
BILKE Edward Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BILLER [PHILLER] Phelix Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BLANK Julius A Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BLINN John G Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BOCKER A A (Miss) On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BOLLENBACHER Rudolf Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BORCK Karl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BORSCHEL George Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BOTHEN I On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
BOTICA Jack Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
BOYENS Christian H Wilheim Y Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BRAYANNER Gustav Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
BRBIN Ivan On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
BULOG Ivan On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
BUNZEL Frank Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
CAMES Frank Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
CEBALO Anton On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
CEBALO Stipan On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
CHRISTEMANN Ludwig Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
CLAUSEN Arnold Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
CORICH Ivan On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
CRABVAC M On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
CRELL Arthur A Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
CULAV Petar On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
CULAV Petar G On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
CULAY Grgo Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
CURACH Jure On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
CVITANOVICH Dragustin On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
DALCHOV Karl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DE STOIS Fritz E On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DERKMANN Frederick Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DETHIOFF Alfred Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DEUTSCH Jacob On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DIBBORN George J Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DIEHL Edward Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DIERING Arthur Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DIESTER Ernest Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DIETRICH Richard P Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DORN Ernest Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DORSCH Frantz L Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DROPCIH Anton On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
DUBOIS Magnus L Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DUERKOP Wilhelm M Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
DUGANZICH John Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
EBERHARDT Adolph F Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ECKHARDT Carl N Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
EDER Michael Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
EDER Otto Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
EHRAT Ambrose Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
EILDENDER Lothar R Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ERCEG Marino On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ERDMANN Hermann Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ERES Barisa Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
EVART Charlie Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
FARACH Anton On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
FARACH Ivan On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
FARACH Mako On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
FARRELL Arthur H On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
FARRELL Guderia Arthur Horst On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
FIERABEND Gottlieb Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
FISCHER Heinrich Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
FOSS Hermann Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
FRANHEIM Wilhelm Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
FREUND Otto H Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
FREY Rudolph Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
FRIEDLANDER Gustav Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
FRITZ Karl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
FUCHS John Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GAISBOCK Johann Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
GATHEMANN Ernest Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GAYER Gustave Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GEBAUER Paul Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GEIPEL Adolph F Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GIER George Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GNEINWIESER Theodor On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GOEDECKE Heinrich Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GONG Wilhelm On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GOTTESCHALK Max Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GRANS Godfrey Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GRAW Albert Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GRBAVAC Martin On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
GREUN Karl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GROSSMANN George Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GROTH Gens H Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
GUGICH Ivan On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
HADLER Charles (Karl) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HALLER Paul Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
HANNAPPEL Henry Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HANSEEN Karl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HANSON Theodor F P Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HARTWIG Paul Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HARYEES Henry Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HECHT Edward Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HEIDEL Max Albert Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HEINRICHE Paul Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HEINSEN Gottfried Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HEINTZ Julius A Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HELZEITT Wilhelm M Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HENNIG Carl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HERMAN Albert Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HEYON Bernard Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HINKELMANN Wilhelm Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HINZ Arnold Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HIRSCH Richard Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HOERING Otto Kark Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HOHER Joseph (Josef) Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
HOOFLICH Paul E O Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HUER Walter Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
HUSSLER August Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
IBLEHAUSEN Arthur Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ISEKE Walthor Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
JAEGER Wilhelm Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
JENSEN Ernest M Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
JERKOVICH Toma On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
JOHANNSEN George Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
JOHNSON (PETERSON) Charlie Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
JOVANOVICH August On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
JUJNOVICH Mate On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
JUKICH Marin On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
KABALIN Ivan On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
KABIERSKI Perl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KAMBLER Frederick Karl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KELLER Leonhard Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KELLOR Theo Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KERDORF Conrad (K) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KERTSCHER Erwin Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KESSLER William Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KESTENHOLZ Albert Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KIRCHEISS Carl T F (Lieut.) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KIRCHHARTZ Ernest B Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KIRMIS Hermann Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KLAIBER Gustav Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KLEMMER (CLEMENTS) George Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KLIBINGAT Christopher Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KLOCHN Ernest W Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KLOCK Otto Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KLORON Joseph Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KLOSE Paul W Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KLUG Roman On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
KNAB (STEVENSON) Wilhelm Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KNAPEK Wilhelm Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
KOCH Martin Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KOERNER Hans Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KOHLER Gustav Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KOWALSKI Michael On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
KRAUSCH Walter Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KRAUSE Ernest Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KRAUSE Heinrich H Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KRAUT Alfred Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KREIJEI Wenzel Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
KREIMEDAHL Harold Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KRIPPNER Joseph Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
KRISHKOVICH Anton On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
KROGER Johannes F Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
KUKALF Merinslav On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
KUKALIJ Joseph On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
KURZEL Hans (with wife and child) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LABARRE Max On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LAMMERHIRT Reinhold Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LANE (LAUE) Robert Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LANSTERMANN Henry Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LAUDON William Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LAUSEN Walther A H F Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LEHMANN Charles Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LEMCKE Cornelius Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LENAS Luciano Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
LEONHARDT Ernest A Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LIBONAU August Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LIPANOVICH George On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
LORENZ Alfred Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
LOSCHE Wilhelm Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LOSSAU Albert Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LUDEMANN Ernest T F Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LUDWIG Gustav Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LULICH Mate On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
LUND Christian O Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
LUPIS Anton On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
LUTHER Martin On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MAASS Martin Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MARKERT Fritz On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MARKOTICH Mate On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MARS Max Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MARTANS Paul Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MARTINOVICH George On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MARUSICH Tony On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MATICH Visco Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MATIN Peter Yelavich On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MATISICH Peter On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MAZURAN Marko On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MEDAK Mick Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MEDAK Tony Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MEDEWALD Charles Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MEDUK Ivan On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MEINEKING Charles L Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MELLERT Friedrich Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MERSEY Rudolph Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MERTIN Carl W (K) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MERZ Christian Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MEYER Walter Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MEYOR Hans Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MIBALJIVIC Mate On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MICHAEL Walter Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MICHALON Joseph Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MIHAGEVICH J On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MIHALJIVIE Bernard On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MISSAT Carl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MITLACHER Hugo Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MIZLJAK Bogoslav On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
MONTWELL Otto Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MONZHEIMER Emil Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MOORMEISTER Walter Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MOTKUS Gustav Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MOULDENHAUER Max Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MULLER Albin M Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
MULLER Max R O Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
NAWRATH Adolph Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
NESTMANN Max Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
NEUMANN Oskar Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
NEVER August Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
NICKEL Conrad Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
OAMEKE August Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
OBER Philli[ Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
OELSLATTER Phillip A Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
OEMEKE Ludwig Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
OEMEKE Rudolf Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
OHLSEN Peter Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
OHLSEN Harry C A (K.) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
OHLSEN (KAESBDIG) Charles Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
OLMS Otto Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
OSBAHR Heinrich F W C Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
OSCHMANN Otto Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
OTTENG (BRANNER) Wilhelm Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
PAHLICKE William Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
PAPICH Ivan Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
PAULSEN Albert Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
PAULSEN Hans Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
PAULSEN Hermann Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
PERMIEN Heinrich Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
PETERSEN Henrich Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
PETERSEN Nann Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
PFEIL Franz Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
PHEIFFER Max Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
PIER Joseph On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
PIRSVIC Mate On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
PISKULICH Frank Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
PISKULICH Joe On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
PISKULICH Sam On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
PISKULICH Simon On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
POSA Anton On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
POSA D D On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
POSA N On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
POSHA Nickola On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
POSSEHL Eric Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
PREGLER Johann Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
PROBICA L On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
PUHALOVICH John On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
PUSCH Frederich Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
RABENSTEIN Kurt Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
RADICH Ante On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
RADICH Joe Spajan On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
RAKICH Marko Pavo Ivan On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
RAST Richard Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
RAUER Wilhelm Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
RAUGELOFF Stanso Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
RAVLICH Jure Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
REDIGER Friedrich Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
REICHWAIN William Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
REIHER Oaskar Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
REINTS Carl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
REISMANN Karl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
RETKOUSKI Johan Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
REUTER Charlie Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
RODTNICK Frank Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ROMNAU Hans Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ROSE Max Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
RUCKSCHUS Otto Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
RUDOLPH Karl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SAICICH Anton On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
SAIN Jokov On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
SASS Gustav Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHMALKUCHE Fritz Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHMIDT Gustav Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHMIDT Karl Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHMIDT Walter Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHNEIDER Walter Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHNEIDER (SCHNAEDER) Edward Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHOBER Edward Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
SCHOTT Wilhelm Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHUBERT Guido (Dr) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHULTES Antonio Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHULTZ Eric (Dr) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHULTZ Heinrich Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHULTZ Sigismund Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHUMACHER Frederick Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHWACHENBERG Otto Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHWARTZ Frederich Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCHWONKE Fred (Emil) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SCOCH Jacob Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SEEGER Adolph Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SESSONS George (Dr) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SIMIL T On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
SLIJM (OTTAVINE) Jen James Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SMRENICK Alayo Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
SOKOLICH Andro On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
SOKOLICH Ivan On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
SOKOLICH Josif On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
SOKOLICH Jure On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
SONNENBERG Gustav Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SPATZ Karl Rudolph Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SPERLING Kurt Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SPIRINGER (HALL) Otto Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
STAMZAR Carl Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
STEINBRUGGER Hugo Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
STOWER Paul R Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
STOYKOFF Costa Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
STUNZNER Frederich (with wife and children) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
STUPARICH Giovanni Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
SUBERT F On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
SUESS Hans On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SUHREN Reinhardt Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
SUMAN Pava On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
SUTICH Nikola On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
TALIGANCICH Spiro Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
THIEL Otto Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
THOME Anast Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
THURMER Fritz Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
TOLJ Krizau On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
TOLJAN Bernard On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
TOPP Carl (K.) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
TOPPER Max Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
TRUNT Fred Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
TSCHACKERT Erich Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
TYRDEVICH Donko On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
UNKOVICH Tony Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
URLICH N On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
VOBBE John Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
VOGEL Robert Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
VOGET Paul Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
VOLKMER Walter Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
VON EGIDY Albrecht Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
VON GOESSEL Kurt K R May Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
VON HOLDT Martin On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
VON LUCKNER Felix Alexander (Captain) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
VOSS Frank Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
VUJICICH Mate On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
VUJIEICH Joze Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
VULETICH Ivan On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
WACHAMANN Hans W H Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WAGNER Friedrich (Fritz) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WEBER Frederich Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WEIDNER Osker M T Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WEINGARTH Frederich Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WENHOLD (PITECHE) Wilhelm Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WIEMANN Arthur Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WILKE Albert Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WINKLEMANN Ernst Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WOHNSIEDLER Gottlieb Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WOLF Albert On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WOLF Andrew On Parole German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WOLF Max (Gus) Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WOLF Paul Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WOLFERT Edward Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
WOLKE Charles Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ZATOVAL Von W Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ZDERICH Iliza On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ZDERICH Pasko On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ZEIGER Albert Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ZEITLER Christliet Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ZIDICH Mick Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ZINGSCH Johann Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ZINK Robert Internee German EVENING POST, VOLUME XCVII, ISSUE 114, 16 MAY 1919 Page 8
ZOLERICH E On Parole Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6
ZOROCICH Ivan Internee Austrian/Jugoslav DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 201, 20 MAY 1919 Page 6

TIMARU HERALD, VOLUME CVIII, ISSUE 16825, 21 MAY 1919
Among the Germans who were shipped to their native land from New Zealand in the Willochra last week, was Mr KURZEL, formerly of Temuka.

DOMINION, VOLUME 12, ISSUE 233, 26 JUNE 1919
The number of Germans and others held in internment in New Zealand at the present time is 136. The disposal of these men is governed primarily by the terms of the Peace Treaty, and no move can be made until the Treaty has been given full effect and certain instructions have been received from the Imperial Government. In any, case the prisoners present some problems that will not easily be solved.
The internees comprise the following groups: - Germans interned from within, New Zealand 73. German deportees from Samoa 32. Austrians (including several nationalities) 19. Russians 1. Aliens (not enemy aliens) 3. Others 5.
The Germans interned within New Zealand consist of persons who do not wish to return to their own country. They had the opportunity to do that when the Willochra took away a large batch of prisoners and internees. Many of them are New Zealand residents of long standing. Some of them claim to be loyal British subjects. Most of these men would like to stay in New Zealand, where some of them have business interests and family connections, including wives and children. The forcible deportation of some of these men would involve either the separation of husband from wife and child or the dispatch of New Zealand women to Germany. The German deportees from Samoa consist largely of men who have business interests in the islands and wish to return there. Some of the men are planters, whose Samoan property, though probably depreciated, are still valuable. It appears that the Government has power, under the Peace Treaty, to take over the properties and leave the late owners to collect their compensation from the German authorities.
The Austrians and Russians include Czecho-Slavs and Jugo-Slavs. The military authorities have not essayed the almost impossible task of defining nationalities with exactitude. The men were interned because the authorities had reason to believe that they were not loyal to tho British Empire, and the matter rests there pending the final settlement. Some Slavs who have been able to prove their right to citizenship of the new States have been released already. The other men included in the list of internees, may be classed generally as "undesirables."

NZ TRUTH, ISSUE 772, 3 APRIL 1920
A. MURAVLEFF writes from the Featherston Internment Camp. I was interned in 1917 as a Russian subject, although my country was allied to Great Britain...The above was referred to the Defence Department, which states the position as follows: A. MURAVLEFF, or MANDLE, or MENDEL, was arrested and interned as an alien reasonably suspected of being disaffected and dangerous. He has no documentary evidence to substantiate his statement that he is a Russian subject. He filled in his Aliens' Registration card as a French subject...



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